Newer Oral Contraceptives Associated with Lower Odds for Ovarian Cancer

 

Dr. Aminah Jatoi on Ovarian Cancer and Oral Contraceptives

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Reducing Your Risk for Ovarian Cancer

Video taken from the channel: uvahealth


 

Birth Control Pills Tied to Reduced Risk of Deadly Ovarian Ca Medpage Today

Video taken from the channel: MedPage Today


 

Mayo Clinic Minute: Oral Contraceptives and Ovarian Cancer

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

‘GMA’ Hot List: Birth control linked to lower ovarian cancer risk

Video taken from the channel: Good Morning America


 

Newer hormonal birth control linked to lower ovarian cancer risk: Study

Video taken from the channel: Good Morning America


 

Can birth control pills protect women from cancer?

Video taken from the channel: ABC News


New Birth Control Pills Tied to Lower Cancer Risk. WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) There’s long been a connection between birth control pills and a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Newer Birth Control Pills Tied to Lower Odds for Ovarian Cancer. WEDNESDAY, Sept.

26, 2018 (HealthDay News) There’s long been a connection between birth control pills and a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Now, new research suggests that’s true for the latest form of the drug, as well. Scientists say the protective effect of the newer pills which contain lower doses of. WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) There’s long been a connection between birth control pills and a reduced risk of ovarian cancer.

Now, new research suggests that’s true for the latest form of the drug, as well. Scientists say the protective effect of the newer pills which contain lower doses of estrogens and different progestogens rose over time and persisted. WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) There’s long been a connection between birth control pills and a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Now, new research suggests that’s true for the latest form of the drug, as well.

READ: Birth Control Options Chart. Scientists say the protective effect of the newer pills which contain lower doses of estrogens and different progestogens WEDNESDAY, Sept.

26, 2018 (HealthDay — News) — There’s long been a connection between birth control pills and a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Now, new research suggests that’s true for the latest form of the drug, as well. Scientists say the protective effect of the newer pills — which contain lower doses of estrogens and different progestogens — rose over time and persisted.

Newer birth control pills tied to lower risk of ovarian cancer. There’s long been a connection between birth control pills and a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Now, new research suggests that’s. New research shows that use of the modern combined pill and lower levels of ovarian cancer are linked.

Although so far the research has just shown a link, rather than causation, it’s a positive start. Newer versions of the birth control pill provide more protective benefits against ovarian cancer than older versions of the pill. The reduced risk was strengthened the longer oral contraceptives. Reduced Risk: Ovarian Cancer Combo estrogen/progesterone birth control pills can lower your risk of this type of cancer. The benefit starts within 3 to 6 months after starting the pill.

The longer you take it, the lower your risk. The following navigation utilizes arrow, enter, escape, and space bar key commands. Left and right arrows move through main tier links and expand /.

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Given this explanation, women who have taken birth-control pills (either the old-time high-dose pills or the current low-dose pills) may actually lower their risk of ovarian cancer because the pill suppresses ovulation.

“Menopause For Dummies” by Marcia L. Jones, Theresa Eichenwald, Nancy W. Hall
from Menopause For Dummies
by Marcia L. Jones, Theresa Eichenwald, Nancy W. Hall
Wiley, 2011

For example, women who have used birth control pills for five years or more have a 40 to 50 percent reduction in ovarian cancer risk, and a 60-75 percent reduction in risk of endometrial cancer.

“Screaming to be Heard: Hormonal Connections Women Suspect... and Doctors Still Ignore” by D. Lee D. Vliet
from Screaming to be Heard: Hormonal Connections Women Suspect… and Doctors Still Ignore
by D. Lee D. Vliet
M. Evans, 2005

The effect on endometrial cancer of taking the pill is similar to that of ovarian cancer, with use of the pill decreasing risk of endometrial cancer by 50%.

“Women's Health in General Practice” by Danielle Mazza
from Women’s Health in General Practice
by Danielle Mazza
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2011

For ovarian cancer, there is a 50% reduction in the risk of both epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer after 5 years use of the combined pill.

“Dewhurst's Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology” by Sir John Dewhurst, Keith Edmonds
from Dewhurst’s Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
by Sir John Dewhurst, Keith Edmonds
Wiley, 2012

Ovarian cancer protection appears to be the same regard­less of the type or amount of hormone in the pill, but pills with higher doses of progestin may reduce risk even further.

“Primary Care E-Book: A Collaborative Practice” by Terry Mahan Buttaro, Patricia Polgar-Bailey, Joanne Sandberg-Cook, JoAnn Trybulski
from Primary Care E-Book: A Collaborative Practice
by Terry Mahan Buttaro, Patricia Polgar-Bailey, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

The National Cancer Institute reports that while birth control pills decrease risks of ovarian and endometrial cancer, they also may increase risks of breast, cervical, and liver cancers.

“Master Your Metabolism: The 3 Diet Secrets to Naturally Balancing Your Hormones for a Hot and Healthy Body!” by Jillian Michaels, Mariska van Aalst, Christine Darwin
from Master Your Metabolism: The 3 Diet Secrets to Naturally Balancing Your Hormones for a Hot and Healthy Body!
by Jillian Michaels, Mariska van Aalst, Christine Darwin
Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale, 2009

The combination pill also lowers the risk of endometrial cancer and, as with ovarian cancer, the protective effect increases with length of pill use, and protection continues after a woman stops using the pill.

“Human Reproductive Biology” by Richard E. Jones, Kristin H Lopez
from Human Reproductive Biology
by Richard E. Jones, Kristin H Lopez
Elsevier Science, 2013

There is evidence to suggest that the progestagenic milieu of pregnancy and the pill might also protect against ovarian cancer by increasing apoptosis of ovarian epithelial cells, thereby cleansing the ovary of cells that have acquired genetic damage (165).

“Berek and Hacker's Gynecologic Oncology” by Jonathan S. Berek, Neville F. Hacker
from Berek and Hacker’s Gynecologic Oncology
by Jonathan S. Berek, Neville F. Hacker
Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Health, 2010

For example, women who take birth control pills have a lower prevalence of ovarian and endometrial cancers, and benign breast disease and ovarian cysts are less common in them.

“New Dimensions In Women's Health” by Linda Alexander, Judith LaRosa, Helaine Bader, Susan Garfield
from New Dimensions In Women’s Health
by Linda Alexander, Judith LaRosa, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2009

Hormone replacement therapy has been associated with a 19–24% increased risk of ovarian cancer; however, the risk is not increased in women using hormone replacement therapy for less than 5 years, and decreases once a woman stops taking it (Zhou et al 2008).

“Gynaecology E-Book: Expert Consult: Online and Print” by Robert W. Shaw, David Luesley, Ash K. Monga
from Gynaecology E-Book: Expert Consult: Online and Print
by Robert W. Shaw, David Luesley, Ash K. Monga
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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2 comments

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  • Does Clegenatur Methods really work? I see many people keep on speaking about Clegenatur Methods. But I’m uncertain if it is good enough to enhance their bust size naturally.

  • I know myself and 3 other women took the pill for years. All of us had to get biopsies for pre-cancer.

    None of us smoke.

    Myself, i don’t have any pre-cancer that needs a biopsy if i don’t take the pill. It goes away.