New Study Finds One More Reason for Childhood Weight problems

 

New Study Finds Child’s Weight Is Largely Hereditary

Video taken from the channel: CBS Boston


 

New study shows startling spike in child obesity rates

Video taken from the channel: CityNews Toronto


 

New Study: Despite Efforts, Childhood Obesity Remains on the Rise

Video taken from the channel: Duke Health


 

Study Finds Children Carry Implicit Bias Towards Peers Who Are Overweight

Video taken from the channel: Duke Health


 

New Study Finds Obese Kids Have Thinner Brains

Video taken from the channel: The Doctors


 

Antibiotics linked to childhood obesity, study finds

Video taken from the channel: CBS This Morning


 

Parents Slow to Recognize Obese Children

Video taken from the channel: Lee Health


Boys are especially prone to excess weight in the wake of divorce, according to the study of 3,000 third-graders in Norway. These boys were 63 percent more likely to be overweight or obese than boys whose parents stayed married, the researchers found. Certain risk factors in childhood can identify those who are more likely to suffer severe obesity in adulthood, a new study finds. The research included more than 12,000 participants from different countries who were followed from childhood.

Family history, psychological factors, and lifestyle all play a role in childhood obesity. Children whose parents or other family members are overweight or obese are more likely to follow suit. But. A recent study has found a way to reduce the risk of obesity in children. The researchers of the study analysed breast milk as a potential factor, for childhood obesity.

Probiotics found in yoghurt drinks could reduce childhood obesity and the risk of developing serious diseases like type 2 diabetes, scientists have revealed. The study compared 100 obese children. Social: Limited school athletic activities coupled with excessive time-utilizing social networks, TV, and computer games are a prime reason for pediatric obesity. Watching TV while eating a meal as well as the excessive consumption of takeout/fast food are also both risk factors for both pediatric and adult obesity.

A new study indicates there may be yet another reason to reduce childhood obesity — it may help prevent allergies. The study published in the May issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical. Previous research has shown that obesity runs in families, and twin studies suggest that this is largely due to genetic factors, with heritability estimates over 50%. 32 genes have been identified. 20 A subsequent study found an association between maternal employment and childhood obesity only for children whose mothers were employed full time when the child.

Some obesity researchers said the new study following kindergartners over the years also hinted at another factor: the powerful influence of genetics on obesity, something that can be a challenge.

List of related literature:

The CDC suggests that parents should work hard to reduce a child’s risk of becoming obese, as childhood obesity increases the likelihood of that child staying obese into adulthood, which in turn increases the risk for many other health issues such as high blood pressure and diabetes.

“Handbook of Behavior, Food and Nutrition” by Victor R. Preedy, Ronald Ross Watson, Colin R. Martin
from Handbook of Behavior, Food and Nutrition
by Victor R. Preedy, Ronald Ross Watson, Colin R. Martin
Springer New York, 2011

Because the causes of overweight in children and adolescents are multifactorial, such as the great availability of energy-dense foods and increasing portion sizes, even those who are active can be at risk.

“Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes, 3rd Ed.” by Monique Ryan, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN
from Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes, 3rd Ed.
by Monique Ryan, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN
VeloPress, 2012

Fast food, increased portion sizes, increased energy density, sugar-sweetened soft drinks, and foods with a high glycemic index are all likely contributing to the increased weights in children and adolescents.

“Porth Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health States” by Ruth A. Hannon, Charlotte Pooler, Carol Mattson Porth
from Porth Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health States
by Ruth A. Hannon, Charlotte Pooler, Carol Mattson Porth
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Similarly, markers of abdominal obesity were also found to be lower in adolescents who reported eating sweets more often [21,27]; in Saudi adolescents, this was also the case for baked goods and potato chips [27].

“Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Abdominal Obesity” by Ronald Ross Watson
from Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Abdominal Obesity
by Ronald Ross Watson
Elsevier Science, 2014

One obvious way to limit childhood obesity is by making it harder for schoolchildren to access fatty and sugary foods.

“Health Economics” by Jay Bhattacharya, Timothy Hyde, Peter Tu
from Health Economics
by Jay Bhattacharya, Timothy Hyde, Peter Tu
Palgrave Macmillan, 2013

Studies have also shown that childhood obesity is strongly linked to adult obesity and that obese youth are more likely to have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as high cholesterol or hypertension.

“Current Surgical Therapy E-Book” by John L. Cameron, Andrew M. Cameron
from Current Surgical Therapy E-Book
by John L. Cameron, Andrew M. Cameron
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

When they also looked at known risk factors for adolescent obesity, they also found consistent income related gradients, with lower income adolescents less likely to have regular exercise and more likely to have recently consumed soda or fast food.

“Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and the Social Determinants of Health” by Donald A. Barr
from Health Disparities in the United States: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and the Social Determinants of Health
by Donald A. Barr
Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019

○ Obesity in childhood or adolescence greatly increases the risk that the person will remain obese as an adult.

“Pediatric Primary Care E-Book” by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, Margaret A. Brady, Nancy Barber Starr, Catherine G. Blosser, Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks
from Pediatric Primary Care E-Book
by Catherine E. Burns, Ardys M. Dunn, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

A few uncommon medical conditions are also associated with increased risk of obesity in children (see Table evolve 14.9 ).

“Human Nutrition E-Book” by Catherine Geissler, Hilary Powers
from Human Nutrition E-Book
by Catherine Geissler, Hilary Powers
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

The truth is that although adults have a lot of biological underpinnings they can blame their obesity on (thyroid issues, for one), children very rarely have a genetic or medical condition (other than genes that make saturated fat, sugar, and salt addictive) that contributes to obesity.

“YOU: On A Diet Revised Edition: The Owner's Manual for Waist Management” by Michael F. Roizen, Mehmet Oz
from YOU: On A Diet Revised Edition: The Owner’s Manual for Waist Management
by Michael F. Roizen, Mehmet Oz
Scribner, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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