New Or Law Enables Women to possess Year s Way to obtain Contraception

 

Rethinking Oregon Settlement

Video taken from the channel: Oregon Historical Society


 

Bipartisan Solutions for Birth Control Access

Video taken from the channel: R Street Institute


 

W.O.M.M. Increased Birth Control Access Ep. 16

Video taken from the channel: Conscious Thought


 

Oregon to Offer Over-the-Counter Birth Control

Video taken from the channel: TheLipTV


 

Oregon Women Can Now Get Birth Control Without A Doctor Visit Newsy

Video taken from the channel: Newsy Science


 

Women In Oregon Can Get Birth Control Without A Prescription

Video taken from the channel: Wochit News


 

Women’s Health 102

Video taken from the channel: DBCnaturalhealth


Oregon has enacted a first-of-its-kind insurance law that will allow women to obtain a year’s worth of birth control at a time, expanding coverage that previously needed to be renewed every 30. A first-of-a-kind insurance law that allows women to obtain a year’s worth of birth control at a time will take effect in Oregon on Jan. 1. Supporters say that no longer limiting women to 30or 90-day supplies will reduce unintended pregnancies and help women by reducing the number of trips they have to make to pharmacies, the Associated Press reported. Oregon to allow year-long birth control supplies June 11, 2015 / 9:36 PM / AP SALEM, Ore. Oregon has enacted a first-of-its-kind insurance law that will allow women to obtain a year’s worth of.

Oregon’s law, which went into effect on Jan. 1, allows pharmacists to prescribe oral contraceptives to women 18 years or older. However, minors still need a doctor’s prescription, according to. New Law Allows Women in Oregon to Buy Birth Control at the Pharmacy Without a Doctor’s Prescription this link is to an external site that may or may not meet accessibility guidelines.

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Oregon has enacted a first-of-its-kind insurance law that will allow women to obtain a year’s worth of birth control at a time, expanding coverage that previously needed to be renewed every 30 or 90 days. Gov. Kate Brown signed the legislation Thursday, saying it “has a simple premise that I whole-heartedly believe in: increase access and decrease barriers.”.

Oregon’s law, which went into effect on Jan. 1, allows pharmacists to prescribe oral contraceptives to women 18 years or older. However, minors still need a doctor’s prescription, according to KEZI, an ABC station in Oregon. Oregon is the second state behind California to pass such regulations.

The other law allows women to obtain a yearlong supply of birth control at a time. In 2016, House Bill 3343 went into effect, making Oregon the first state in the nation to require health insurers to give a year’s supply of the pill, the patch or the ring at the same time! Dispensing a one-year supply of birth control is associated with a 30 percent reduction in the odds unplanned pregnancy compared with dispensing 30 or 90 days. On January 1, 2016, two new reproductive rights laws went into effect statewide. The first allows Oregonians to pick up a full year’s worth of birth control at a time, rather than return to the pharmacy every month.

The second allows pharmacists to prescribe birth control pills and patches to patients without an appointment.

List of related literature:

(Several counties in Oregon already allow pharmacists to dispense emergency contraception over the counter.)

“The Moral Property of Women: A History of Birth Control Politics in America” by Linda Gordon
from The Moral Property of Women: A History of Birth Control Politics in America
by Linda Gordon
University of Illinois Press, 2002

By 1928, the Society’s legislative program included two provisions promoting birth control, one calling for “state authorization” for physicians to prescribe “contraceptive materials or devices to their married patients” and another making the sale of such materials legal by druggists.

“Preaching Eugenics: Religious Leaders and the American Eugenics Movement” by Christine Rosen
from Preaching Eugenics: Religious Leaders and the American Eugenics Movement
by Christine Rosen
Oxford University Press, 2004

The need for policy changes is apparent in states where schools provide only abstinence-based sex education and where women are forced to receive spousal or parental permission for reproductive medical procedures such as abortion or contraception.

“Policing the National Body: Sex, Race, and Criminalization” by Jael Silliman, Anannya Bhattacharjee, Angela Yvonne Davis, Committee on Women, Population, and the Environment
from Policing the National Body: Sex, Race, and Criminalization
by Jael Silliman, Anannya Bhattacharjee, et. al.
South End Press, 2002

Almost all states supply the contraceptive selected.

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, W. E. Jacott, M. G. Rosen, Robert B. Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, et. al.
Springer New York, 2013

In states such as Oregon and California, pharmacists can now prescribe hormonal contraception without a woman visiting a health professional for a prescription.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Ellen Olshansky
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

This partially overturned the Comstock Laws passed in 1873 that were designed to ban distribution of contraception.

“Speroff's Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility” by Hugh S. Taylor, Lubna Pal, Emre Sell
from Speroff’s Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility
by Hugh S. Taylor, Lubna Pal, Emre Sell
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2019

Is this a policy argument or could a failure to provide contraceptive coverage be considered impermissible sex discrimination?

“Health Care Law and Ethics” by Mark A. Hall, David Orentlicher, Mary Anne Bobinski, Nicholas Bagley, I. Glenn Cohen
from Health Care Law and Ethics
by Mark A. Hall, David Orentlicher, et. al.
Wolters Kluwer, 2018

State policies in brief: Emergency contraception.

“Women's Lives: A Psychological Exploration, Fourth Edition” by Claire A. Etaugh, Judith S. Bridges
from Women’s Lives: A Psychological Exploration, Fourth Edition
by Claire A. Etaugh, Judith S. Bridges
Taylor & Francis, 2017

Twenty-nine states also still have laws which prohibit nonmedical people from giving birth control advice.

“Black and African-American Studies: American Dilemma, the Negro Problem and Modern Democracy” by Gunnar Myrdal
from Black and African-American Studies: American Dilemma, the Negro Problem and Modern Democracy
by Gunnar Myrdal
Transaction Publishers, 1995

Yet neither married nor single women in Connecticut or Massachusetts could legally get birth control.

“Jane Against the World: Roe v. Wade and the Fight for Reproductive Rights” by Karen Blumenthal
from Jane Against the World: Roe v. Wade and the Fight for Reproductive Rights
by Karen Blumenthal
Roaring Brook Press, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • I love my state. If anyone here doesn’t like it, hey, you got all the other nation/states to move to. Like Texas, or West Virginia. I can’t move to Sweden, but coming back to my home state is the next best thing. Suck it rest of the country!

  • But now that it is over the counter insurance companies can refuse to cover it and it can then cost whatever the drug companies want to charge

  • This is a nonissue elsewhere. In Hong Kong women can buy birth control without a prescription, you’re just strongly advised to have met with a physician and know which type and dosage size to take.