New Genetic Test May Identify Cancer Of The Breast Patients Who Do not Need Chemotherapy

 

Study: Many with early stages of breast cancer don’t need chemotherapy

Video taken from the channel: LOCAL 12


 

Oncotype DX testing to determine if a breast cancer patient will benefit from chemotherapy

Video taken from the channel: VJOncology


 

Women with the most common kind of breast cancer can skip chemotherapy: Study

Video taken from the channel: Good Morning America


 

Study: Some breast cancer patients may not need chemo

Video taken from the channel: KARE 11


 

Testing Allows Cancer Patients to Skip Chemo

Video taken from the channel: Associated Press


 

Most breast cancer patients could avoid chemo with use of genetic testing

Video taken from the channel: ecancer


 

Gene test finds which breast cancer patients can skip chemo

Video taken from the channel: LOCAL 12


“Basically, it’s going to spare a lot of unnecessary chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer.” The genomic test for this type of breast cancer, called Oncotype DX, measures the expression of 21. Many women with early breast cancer may not need chemo, study finds Genetic test can help determine treatment for patients with smaller tumors that have not spread to the lymph nodes The new study. Personalising treatment Most progress towards personalising treatment has been in developing genetic tests for breast cancer, performed on tumour samples taken during surgery. One.

Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines on who should have genetic testing after a breast cancer diagnosis miss about half of people with a genetic mutation linked to the disease, according to a study. The research was published online on Dec. 7, 2018, by the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Some women inherit changes (mutations) in certain genes that increases their risk of breast cancer (and possibly other cancers).

Genetic testing can be done to look for mutations in some of these genes. While testing can be helpful in some cases, not every woman needs to be tested, and the pros and cons need to be considered carefully. Genetic testing is available for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Most breast and ovarian cancer is not caused by inherited mutations, so genetic testing will not help most women with a family health history of breast and ovarian cancer.

Genetic testing will not identify the cause for some hereditary breast and ovarian cancers, because the genes affected in these cancers are not yet known. Researchers say a new genetic test for breast cancer patients may indicate whether standard chemotherapy treatments will work. Their study, published in. “Only about 5 to 10% of cancer cases are related to genetics,” says Karen Lu, M.D., co-medical director of the Clinical Cancer Genetics Program at MD Anderson. “Genetic testing is a powerful tool to identify those individuals who are at especially increased risk for. A woman’s lifetime risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer is greatly increased if she inherits a harmful mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2..

Breast cancer: About 12% of women in the general population will develop breast cancer sometime during their lives ().By contrast, a recent large study estimated that about 72% of women who inherit a harmful BRCA1 mutation and about 69% of women who. A genetic test called MammaPrint determined that nearly half the women slated for chemotherapy based on standard clinical assessments didn’t really need to undergo the challenging treatment.

List of related literature:

Screening for mutations in these genes can provide a risk-alerting system for breast and ovarian cancer.

“Introduction to Genomics” by Arthur M. Lesk
from Introduction to Genomics
by Arthur M. Lesk
Oxford University Press, 2017

Therefore, most family history clinics have been offering such testing to patients who have high-risk features, such as early-onset breast cancers or a family history consistent with germline mutations.

“Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.” by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
from Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.
by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, 2010

The genetic test is positive for gene BRCA1, and her risk of breast cancer is significantly higher thanfor other women who do not have this gene.

“Health & Wellness”
from Health & Wellness
by
, 2008

Widespread screening for BRCA1 or BRCA2, inherited mutations that increase the risk for breast cancer, is not recommended, but women with a suggestive family history (multiple first-degree relatives with breast or ovarian cancer) should be referred for genetic counseling.

“Goldman's Cecil Medicine,Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features and Print, Single Volume,24: Goldman's Cecil Medicine” by Russell La Fayette Cecil, Lee Goldman, Andrew I. Schafer
from Goldman’s Cecil Medicine,Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features and Print, Single Volume,24: Goldman’s Cecil Medicine
by Russell La Fayette Cecil, Lee Goldman, Andrew I. Schafer
Elsevier/Saunders, 2012

A second type of presymptomatic genetic testing, predispositional genetic testing, is exemplified by testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2, the genes linked to breast and ovarian cancer.

“Encyclopedia of Family Health” by Martha Craft-Rosenberg, Shelley-Rae Pehler
from Encyclopedia of Family Health
by Martha Craft-Rosenberg, Shelley-Rae Pehler
SAGE Publications, 2011

In the second case, Mrs. B may be a good candidate for testing for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, which confer a higher risk of breast cancer.

“The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics” by Peter A. Singer, A. M. Viens
from The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics
by Peter A. Singer, A. M. Viens
Cambridge University Press, 2008

In effect, Liu and coworkers have directly observed the putative BRCA1 tumor progenitor cell, which bears the same ER-negative basal phenotype as the breast cancers that arise from it.

“The Breast E-Book: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Diseases” by Kirby I. Bland, Edward M. Copeland, V. Suzanne Klimberg
from The Breast E-Book: Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Diseases
by Kirby I. Bland, Edward M. Copeland, V. Suzanne Klimberg
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

This is not to say BRCA1/2 testing is advisable for all women with a family history of cancer.

“Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-First Century” by Dorothy Roberts
from Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-First Century
by Dorothy Roberts
New Press, 2011

The negative genetic test simply removes the risk for less than 10 percent of breast cancers—those involving the known inherited genetic predisposition.

“Practical Decision Making in Health Care Ethics: Cases and Concepts, Third Edition” by Raymond J. Devettere
from Practical Decision Making in Health Care Ethics: Cases and Concepts, Third Edition
by Raymond J. Devettere
Georgetown University Press, 2009

Susceptibility testing is performed for hereditary can– cer syndromes, such as hereditary breast and ovarian cancer caused by mutations in the breast cancer genes BRCA1 or BRCA2.

“Genetics For Dummies” by Tara Rodden Robinson, Lisa Spock
from Genetics For Dummies
by Tara Rodden Robinson, Lisa Spock
Wiley, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • What do you do when your oncologist lies about your condition, uses a medication way too powerful, and an extra experimental drug that made him tons of money. Then he continued treatment when he knew there were majorside effects. I have been in constant, crippling pain for 5 1/2 years. Had I not stopped treatment on my own I would be dead now. Somedays I rhink it would be preferable. There is NO accountability. I was told by several lawyers that he was untouchable, unaccountable for destroying my health and life, because I was given “A cancer drug” and I took it.

  • I knew this 12 years ago when I looked into French studies and did not have chemo or radiation and I am fine!I would never take chemo that has not been genetically tested and proven to fight my particular cancer. Too many unscrupulous doctors (who make money from chemo use) will give a patient a chemo drug that has already been proven ineffectual for a given cancer but makes them good money! Chris beat cancer has a video with a very experienced oncology nurse that lists the best steps and tests to take before deciding on treatment and alternatives. With the odds most of us have today it is important to do the research way before you might be diagnosed and keep up to date too!

  • Never in a million years would I destroy my immune system with chemo they better target my cancer with a virus so my body knows to fight it off and kill it