New Coeliac Disease Trigger Discovered

 

How I Diagnosed Myself with Celiac Disease | My Diagnosis Story

Video taken from the channel: Hailey & a Spoon


 

Investigational New Drug Offers Hope for Celiac Disease Patients

Video taken from the channel: DDW Meeting


 

Researchers working to find cause of celiac disease

Video taken from the channel: ABC 7 Chicago


 

Celiac disease could be triggered by Reovirus, research finds

Video taken from the channel: medXclusive Learning


 

Celiac disease: Mayo Clinic Radio

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Gluten and Celiac Disease

Video taken from the channel: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)


 

New discovery into what triggers coeliac disease | Nine News Australia

Video taken from the channel: 9 News Australia


Two new studies are offering novel insights into celiac disease, the autoimmune disorder triggered by exposure to gluten. One study from University of Sheffield researchers is suggesting immune. With Coeliac disease on the rise today, one way be wondering how this disease all came about. With recent developments and popularity over eating gluten free, it’s hard to imagine that Coeliac disease was actually discovered all the way back in the 1940’s by physician Willem Dicke. Dicke was the medical director at a children’s hospital and became increasingly interested in coeliac disease after.

October 22, 2019 | By Marla Paul. Results of a new phase 2 clinical trial using technology developed at Northwestern Medicine show it is possible to induce immune tolerance to gluten in individuals with celiac disease. The findings may pave the way for treated celiac patients to eventually tolerate gluten in their diet. Celiac disease is a serious, genetic autoimmune disorder triggered by consuming a protein called gluten, which is found in wheat, barley and rye.

When a person with celiac eats gluten, the protein interferes with the absorption of nutrients from food by damaging a part of the small intestine called villi. Results of a new phase 2 clinical trial using technology developed at Northwestern Medicine show it is possible to induce immune tolerance to gluten in individuals with celiac disease. Professor Ludvig Sollid, and his team at the Centre for Immune Regulation at University of Oslo, have discovered that people with celiac disease suffer from one of two defective human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), which cause the immune system to see gluten molecules as dangerous, triggering the immune response that causes classic celiac-associated inflammation and other symptoms.

A new study raises a novel idea about what might trigger celiac disease, a condition that makes patients unable to tolerate foods containing gluten. The study suggests that a. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Celiac Disease Share Increased Risk. People with celiac disease have a 10-fold greater risk for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Those with IBD have a 4-fold greater risk for celiac disease. A new study reviews the link between these two autoimmune disorders. Continue Reading. Mayo Clinic researchers have uncovered a new link between celiac disease, a digestive condition triggered by consumption of gluten, and dementia or other forms of cognitive decline. The accident sounds like the trigger, but it didn’t cause the Celiac.

Mine was triggered, ironicly, by surgery that was being done to treat my heavy bleeding. My GYN felt that my worsening anemia (BC went fron 12 to 8.5 in 2 months) was due to the bleeding so I had an endometrial ablation w/ D&C under general anesthesia in Mar. of 04.

List of related literature:

It is plausible that the contact with gliadin at a time when there is ongoing intestinal inflam­mation, altered intestinal permeability, and enhanced antigen presen­tation can increase the risk of developing celiac disease, at least in a subset of persons (Fig. 338­3).

“Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set” by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, Joseph St. Geme, MD, Nina F Schor, MD, PhD
from Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics, 2-Volume Set
by Robert M. Kliegman, MD, Bonita F. Stanton, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

New tool to predict celiac disease on its way to the clinics.

“Mucosal Immunology” by Jiri Mestecky, Michael E. Lamm, Pearay L. Ogra, Warren Strober, John Bienenstock, Jerry R. McGhee, Lloyd Mayer
from Mucosal Immunology
by Jiri Mestecky, Michael E. Lamm, et. al.
Elsevier Science, 2005

In addition to exposure to gluten, the etiology of celiac disease is multifactorial and includes genetic predisposition, microbial infection of the gastrointestinal tract, antibiotic exposure, and gastrointestinal erosion (Riddle et al., 2012).

“Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects” by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, Committee on Genetically Engineered Crops: Past Experience and Future Prospects
from Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects
by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Division on Earth and Life Studies, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2017

For someone with the autoimmune disorder celiac disease, eating gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley, causes damage to the small intestines.

“Nutrition Facts: The Truth About Food” by Karen Frazier
from Nutrition Facts: The Truth About Food
by Karen Frazier
Callisto Media Incorporated, 2015

Celiac disease is a condition in which the protein gluten, found in wheat, barley, and rye, triggers an immune system response that damages or destroys the villi of the small intestine.

“Nutrition: Science and Applications” by Lori A. Smolin, Mary B. Grosvenor
from Nutrition: Science and Applications
by Lori A. Smolin, Mary B. Grosvenor
Wiley, 2019

Case report: Celiac crisis in the modern era.

“Primary Care of the Child With a Chronic Condition E-Book” by Patricia Jackson Allen, Judith A. Vessey, Naomi Schapiro
from Primary Care of the Child With a Chronic Condition E-Book
by Patricia Jackson Allen, Judith A. Vessey, Naomi Schapiro
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

The rule will be helpful for people who have celiac disease, a digestive and autoimmune disorder that results in damage to the lining of the small intestine when foods with gluten are eaten.

“Nutrition” by Paul M. Insel, Don Ross, Kimberley McMahon, Melissa Bernstein
from Nutrition
by Paul M. Insel, Don Ross, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Celiac disease is a relatively common (far more common than previously realized) systemic autoimmune disorder induced by gluten proteins found in wheat, barley, and rye.

“Textbook of Gastroenterology” by Tadataka Yamada, David H. Alpers, Anthony N. Kalloo, Neil Kaplowitz, Chung Owyang, Don W. Powell
from Textbook of Gastroenterology
by Tadataka Yamada, David H. Alpers, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

Celiac disease (also known as celiac sprue) is a disorder in which the mucosa of the small bowel is damaged due to activation of the mucosal immune system by ingestion of gluten, a protein component found in wheat, barley, and rye.

“Conn's Current Therapy 2010 E-Book: Expert Consult” by Edward T. Bope, Robert E. Rakel, Rick D. Kellerman
from Conn’s Current Therapy 2010 E-Book: Expert Consult
by Edward T. Bope, Robert E. Rakel, Rick D. Kellerman
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder triggered by a sensitivity to gluten (i.e., a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye) and occurs only in children and adults who possess the necessary genetic makeup for the disease.

“Clinical Handbook of Psychological Consultation in Pediatric Medical Settings” by Bryan D. Carter, Kristin A. Kullgren
from Clinical Handbook of Psychological Consultation in Pediatric Medical Settings
by Bryan D. Carter, Kristin A. Kullgren
Springer International Publishing, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

6 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • I’m getting blood work done soon too and I’ve introduced wheat germ to my diet (bc I dont eat much wheat) and I’m starting to feel very bad! I’m like 75% sure it’s celiac disease (especially since I have the celiac gene variation from a genetic testing).

  • Thank god ive come across this I’ve been struggling for 4 years and doctors thought it was my womb and then came across celiac disease and I have every symptom and having blood work next week to test for it I’m just really struggling at minute everything I eat is so painful �� bloating cramping headaches naesea

  • He said one of the symptoms was diarrhea, but my symptom is constipation which he did not even mention. I was diagnosed recently after having problems with my thyroid, gas, bloating and my stomach growling after meals. I saw an endocrinologist, a cardiologist, and a gastroenterologist because no one was able to figure out my problem which since the beginning, I had told doctors that seemed to be caused by my diet. Is it true that we have to avoid sugar and seed oil? @mayoclinic

  • i deff didn’t have any delayed puberty or slowed growth, ahaha. idk if i even had it back then…but i grew up fast and i’m 5’10”!

  • I didnt get a positive on my celiac but the doctor thinks I either have a false negative because of something in my tests that showed up or that I have a sensitivity. It’s frustrating because I’m really really sick right now and they’re like it looks like it could still be gluten but maybe not. Ugh it’s incredibly frustrating.

  • thank you for this video! i’m a college student and i was feeling TERRIBLE every single day. it was so hard staying motivated and doing well in school when i was in constant pain, bloated all the time, sooo sluggish and fatigued that even sitting at my desk to do homework was overwhelming and draining. I did not want to go out with my friends because i was just soo tired all the time. My skin was getting terrible and it was becoming an insecurity for me. Everything was going so wrong and I literally couldn’t do it anymore. They only days I would feel a bit better were days where i would BARELY eat anything. One day I woke up feeling significantly better and i didnt know why. so i analyzed my day and realized i hadn’t eaten any bread or pasta the day before (it took me a few days to figure it out with the help of google). in the next few days i started to pay attention sooo specifically to how i would feel after eating specific things. Today is my first week being gluten-free and i’m feeling so much better. I almost cry of joy thinking when i remember how miserable i was for about a year. I visited a doctor once and it didnt help at all. so i was hesitant to go back. But i’ll be visiting in the next week to discuss this. Thank you so much. This video really really helped me feel less alone about the symptoms:) its hard to feel this way and not know why. I was eating “normal” food so i didnt even think about gluten. MUCH LOVE STAY HEALTHY!