National Survey Shows Moms Want Info on All Infant Feeding Options

 

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A key finding of the survey was that mothers want access to information on all infant feeding options. Three out of four moms believe new mothers should receive information on breastfeeding as well as infant formula so they can make an informed choice. “This survey underscores the reality that when it comes to infant feeding, mothers want full. Last month, a national U.S. survey on infant feeding found that 78 percent of mothers believe new moms should receive information on breastfeeding and other feeding options so they can make an. CDC’s Breastfeeding Report Card, 2020, provides data on breastfeeding practices and supports in all states, the District of Columbia (DC), Puerto Rico, Guam, and the US Virgin Islands.

This year’s report highlights data from CDC’s 2018 national survey of Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) that assesses practices and. Most Mothers, Fathers and Other Caregivers Choose Breastmilk, But Say Important to Make an Informed Choice about Infant Formula. WASHINGTON, June 25, 2019 — The bipartisan team of Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research (GQR) and Public Opinion Strategies (POS) released results from a national survey of 1,200 mothers and caregivers with children less than 12 months of age that reveal the factors behind their infant feeding decisions*. The National Infant Feeding Survey 2008 Prepared for the Health Service Executive by: Professor Cecily Begley, Chair of Nursing and Midwifery Louise Gallagher, 6.1.5 Effect of ethnic origin of the mother on breastfeeding..84 6.1.6 Effect of birth order on breastfeeding..85 6.1.7 Effect of previous breastfeeding experience on.

While there are many feeding choices available to new mothers including but not limited to breastfeeding, bottle feeding of formula, combination feeding, skin-to-skin bottle feeding, expressed breast milk, donor milk, and wet nursing, this research narrowly focuses on how. Results: 65.8% (225/342) mothers did not initiate breast feeding within 1 h of birth, 41.7% (90/216) mothers of children aged 6 months or more did not exclusively breastfeed their babies up to 6 months and 28.1% (96/342) used bottles for baby-feeding. The national Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) Survey provides information that helps hospitals make it easier for moms and babies to start and keep breastfeeding.

Every 2 years, CDC invites all maternity care hospitals across the country to fill out the mPINC Survey. A set of infant feeding options was presented to them. These included: expressed and heat-treated breast milk, milk banks, goat’s milk, wet nursing, infant formula and cow’s milk. Women were requested to give their opinion on all of the options presented.

Site, sample selection and access to sample. The prenatal questionnaire was used to collect information about the infants’ family medical history and the mothers’ health and health care, dietary changes because of pregnancy, employment status, breastfeeding attitudes and experiences, infant feeding plans and confidence in breastfeeding, sources of information about diet and infant feeding, and participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants.

List of related literature:

A study in the United Kingdom reports that healthcare professionals understand influences regarding infant feeding choice.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

One survey found that caregivers are an important source of infant feeding information for parents (70 percent), followed by grandparents (53 percent).

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

Many carefeeding, but it is up to providers to know available nutritional givers are unable to recognize infant cues for hunger and satiety options, normal feeding patterns, and means for measuring adeand misinterpret cries or other vocalizations as a request for quate intake and growth.

“Conn's Current Therapy 2020, E-Book” by Rick D. Kellerman, KUSM-W Medical Practice Association, David Rakel
from Conn’s Current Therapy 2020, E-Book
by Rick D. Kellerman, KUSM-W Medical Practice Association, David Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Infant Feeding Survey UK.

“Wheat and Rice in Disease Prevention and Health: Benefits, risks and mechanisms of whole grains in health promotion” by Ronald Ross Watson, Victor R. Preedy, Sherma Zibadi
from Wheat and Rice in Disease Prevention and Health: Benefits, risks and mechanisms of whole grains in health promotion
by Ronald Ross Watson, Victor R. Preedy, Sherma Zibadi
Elsevier Science, 2014

Though the guidelines offered up by the medical community are certainly valid (probably more so than those offered up by grandma and friends), and should be used to set parameters – an infant’s individual development should be at least one of the deciding factors in promoting a baby to a more varied diet.

“What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]” by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
from What To Expect The 1st Year [rev Edition]
by Heidi Murkoff, Sharon Mazel
Simon & Schuster UK, 2010

Medical providers should teach families about the rooting and sucking reflex and explain that some forms of sucking provide the infant with a means for self-soothing and are not signals that the infant is hungry (nonnutritive vs nutritive sucking).

“Conn's Current Therapy 2019” by Rick D. Kellerman, David Rakel
from Conn’s Current Therapy 2019
by Rick D. Kellerman, David Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

In a survey conducted in the United States in 2004, 37% of people questioned agreed that mothers should breastfeed only in private; a nearly equal percentage favored allowing breastfeeding in public, and the remainder, about 27%, were undecided (CDC, 2004).

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Jan Riordan
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

The second Infant Feeding Practices Survey assessed the diets of pregnant and new mothers and tracked breastfeeding and other infant­feeding practices.

“Present Knowledge in Nutrition” by John W. Erdman, Jr., Ian A. MacDonald, Steven H. Zeisel
from Present Knowledge in Nutrition
by John W. Erdman, Jr., Ian A. MacDonald, Steven H. Zeisel
Wiley, 2012

Defining Adequate Intake To determine if a newborn is receiving adequate nutrition physicians should ask the caregiver how often feedings are occurring, for how long (for breast-fed infants), and how much is eaten (for formula-fed infants) and should assess the number of wet diapers and stools daily.

“Conn's Current Therapy 2016” by Edward T. Bope, Rick D. Kellerman
from Conn’s Current Therapy 2016
by Edward T. Bope, Rick D. Kellerman
Elsevier, 2015

Mothers should be given sufficient information to make an informed choice on their preferred method of feeding‐ choosing formula feeding should not be criticized.

“Neonatology at a Glance” by Tom Lissauer, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Lawrence Miall, Jonathan Fanaroff
from Neonatology at a Glance
by Tom Lissauer, Avroy A. Fanaroff, et. al.
Wiley, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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