MRI Might Predict Cancer Of The Breast Risk in certain Women

 

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Right now, the American Cancer Society recommends that MRI be used along with standard mammograms when women have a roughly 20 percent or higher lifetime risk of breast cancer. The average U.S. The technical term for the MRI finding is “background parenchymal enhancement.” If it does, in fact, foretell a particularly high risk of breast cancer, that could help women and their doctors make some choices, Rahbar said. Those women might want to be screened more often, or consider starting the drug tamoxifen, which cuts breast cancer risk. The technical term for the MRI finding is “background parenchymal enhancement.” If it does, in fact, foretell a particularly high risk of breast cancer, that could help women and their doctors make some choices, Rahbar said. Those women might want to be screened more often, or consider starting the drug tamoxifen, which cuts breast cancer risk.

The technical term for the MRI finding is “background parenchymal enhancement.” If it does, in fact, foretell a particularly high risk of breast cancer, that could help women and their doctors make some choices, Rahbar said. Those women might want to be screened more often, or consider starting the drug tamoxifen, which cuts breast cancer risk. Although mammography screening has been considered the mainstay of breast cancer screening, it has its limitations, especially for high-risk women. MRI, on the other hand, poses no risk of radiation-induced cancer and exhibits high sensitivity, and the potential risks from the application of gadolinium-containing contrast media are minimal.

Researchers found that among high-risk women who had MRI screening, those with a particular feature in the scans — namely, areas of background breast tissue that appear white — were nine times more likely to develop breast cancer over the next couple of years. MRI might predict cancer before it starts Their study suggests that breast MRI, a technique commonly used for screening high-risk women, could be used not only to catch breast cancer, but to predict it before it starts. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized as the most sensitive imaging method for the early detection of breast cancer. Therefore, women at a lifetime risk for breast cancer development of ≥ 20% are invited for intensified screening programs including both mammography and breast MRI. For most women, routine MRI screening would mean many unnecessary biopsies and a lot of unnecessary anxiety.

It’s a different story for women whose family histories or genetic inheritance put them. Clinicians currently rely on epidemiologic models to predict breast cancer risk. The most common is the GAIL model, which looks at a number of factors including a woman’s current age, the age she.

List of related literature:

Breast MRI was recommended for women with a greater than or equal to 20%–25% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, including women with a known BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, or a prior history of radiation therapy to the chest for the treatment of lymphoma.

“Cancer Rehabilitation: Principles and Practice” by Michael O'Dell, MD, Michael Stubblefield, MD
from Cancer Rehabilitation: Principles and Practice
by Michael O’Dell, MD, Michael Stubblefield, MD
Springer Publishing Company, 2009

High-risk women include BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and other high-risk mutation carriers, their first-degree relatives and women from untested families with a 20–30% lifetime breast cancer risk; annual MRI screening should be offered to them.

“Breast Cancer Management for Surgeons: A European Multidisciplinary Textbook” by Lynda Wyld, Christos Markopoulos, Marjut Leidenius, Elżbieta Senkus-Konefka
from Breast Cancer Management for Surgeons: A European Multidisciplinary Textbook
by Lynda Wyld, Christos Markopoulos, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2017

Screening MRI is recommended for women with an approximately 20% to 25% or greater lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, including women with a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer and women who were treated for Hodgkin’s disease.

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from Lippincott Manual of Nursing Practice
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Wolters Kluwer Health, 2013

However, women who are at increased risk for breast cancer may benefit from earlier screening and the addition of breast ultrasound or MRI.

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from Mosby’s Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference E-Book
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Although an average 35-year-old woman would have a 1/10,000 chance of having a cancer, a mutation carrier would have a risk in the range of 1 to 5/100, and MRI would be much more sensitive in this population than mammography.

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from Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine Cloth
by Robert C. Bast, Jr., Carlo M. Croce, et. al.
Wiley, 2017

In women at high risk (Box 40.1), MRI has been shown to have a high sensitivity for detection of malignancy particularly in women younger than 40 years.

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from Llewellyn-Jones Fundamentals of Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book
by Jeremy J N Oats, Suzanne Abraham
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

A recent multiinstitutional study conducted by Lehman, et al. [67] concluded that women at high risk for breast cancer would benefit from screening MRI.

“Management of Breast Diseases” by Ismail Jatoi, Manfred Kaufmann
from Management of Breast Diseases
by Ismail Jatoi, Manfred Kaufmann
Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010

Breast MRI may be with mammography to detect breast cancer in women at high risk for

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The American Cancer Society recommends screening MRI for women who have an approximately 20% to 25% or greater lifetime risk of breast cancer,115 but there are no published data regarding the use of MRI to diagnose breast cancer during pregnancy.

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from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Robert K. Creasy, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2008

Breast MRI may be most useful in women with a family history of breast cancer or those who test positive for the breast cancer gene (BRCA).

“Current Clinical Medicine E-Book: Expert Consult Online” by Cleveland Clinic
from Current Clinical Medicine E-Book: Expert Consult Online
by Cleveland Clinic
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • I have to get one soon. I’m 21, I had a mammogram/ultrasound and it came back unclear in my left breast. I have nipple discharge and pain on both breast. I have a family history of breast cancer too, I’m just super uneasy.

  • If your identical twin sister has breast cancer at 32 but does not carrie the gene that cause breast cancer, does that still count as family history or puts me at even higher risk for having breast cancer in my life time?

  • =✈ Cancer is a disease, a chronic metabolic disease akin to other chronic metabolic diseases such as scurvy, night blindness, pellagra & pernicious anemia. No such disease has ever been cured through mechanical manipulation of the body. Where cancer is seated isn’t relevant to its cure. The preventative, cure & treatment of this vitamin-deficiency disease is Amygdalin (vitamin B17). People who get at least 100 m.g. of B17 daily cannot contract cancer.