Most Pediatricians Don’t Inquire About Mom’s Depression

 

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Fewer than half of pediatricians in the United States ask mothers about depression, even though the condition affects many women with young children, a new study reveals. MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) Fewer than half of pediatricians in the United States ask mothers about depression, even though the condition affects many women with young children, a new study reveals. MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) Fewer than half of pediatricians in the United States ask mothers about depression, even though the condition affects many women with young children, a new study reveals.

MONDAY, March 7, 2016 Fewer than half of pediatricians in the United States ask mothers about depression, even though the condition affects many women with young children, a new study reveals. Most Pediatricians Don’t Ask About Mom’s Depression MONDAY, March 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) Fewer than half of pediatricians in the United States ask mothers about depression, even though the condition affects many women with young children, a new study reveals. “Pediatricians should screen moms for postpartum depression,” she said at an AAP conference session. “Most moms are receptive to communication with their pediatricians. But most pediatricians don’t ask about PPD.”.

Most pediatricians don’t screen for PPD Less than half of pediatricians ask mothers about depressive symptoms. Screening for PPD among pediatricians increased from 33% to 44% between 2004 and 2013 in periodic surveys performed by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). “Most moms are still bringing their children to see us, the pediatricians, so we’re really a touch-point to the health care system for a lot of mothers, which is why over the last decade or so there has been a big shift within pediatrics to screen mothers for postpartum depression,” said Dr. Kallem.

Keep in mind that pediatricians often have to take a mom’s state-of-mind into consideration before dropping some hard truths because new moms can be a little more emotional and scared than most. Don’t worry, there’s a scientific reason for that. Children who don’t understand that fatigue, withdrawal, and irritability are symptoms of a psychiatric illness may start to act out or blame themselves for the changes happening around them. Other adults in the house aren’t immune to the added stress of Mom’s depression, either.

To help the family—and to help the family help Mom—it.

List of related literature:

Most pediatricians won’t treat mom’s depression.

“Your Baby's First Year For Dummies” by James Gaylord, Michelle Hagen
from Your Baby’s First Year For Dummies
by James Gaylord, Michelle Hagen
Wiley, 2011

Many parents and even many pediatricians do not recognize childhood depression, instead attributing the signs of this disorder to normal development.

“When Someone You Love is Depressed” by Xavier Amador, Laura Rosen, Xavier Francisco Amador
from When Someone You Love is Depressed
by Xavier Amador, Laura Rosen, Xavier Francisco Amador
Free Press, 1997

Only 25% of pediatricians reported speaking with the psychiatrist before referral, although 66% thought that doing so might result in communication after the visit.

“Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics E-Book” by William B. Carey, Allen C. Crocker, Ellen Roy Elias, Heidi M. Feldman, William L. Coleman
from Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics E-Book
by William B. Carey, Allen C. Crocker, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Furthermore, in some cases my patients do not necessarily recognise the mother’s depression as such.

“The Dead Mother: The Work of André Green” by Gregorio Kohon
from The Dead Mother: The Work of André Green
by Gregorio Kohon
Routledge, 1999

When the nurse, rather than the patient, is the one who communicates with the primary care provider, the nurse can raise appropriate questions about depression as an adverse medication effect.

“Nursing for Wellness in Older Adults” by Carol A. Miller
from Nursing for Wellness in Older Adults
by Carol A. Miller
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Most research on maternal depression is non-experimental, making it hard to determine what programs can assist mothers with depression.

“Child and Adolescent Development for Educators” by Christi Crosby Bergin, David Allen Bergin, Sue Walker, Graham Daniel, Angela Fenton, Pearl Subban
from Child and Adolescent Development for Educators
by Christi Crosby Bergin, David Allen Bergin, et. al.
Cengage Learning Australia, 2018

All health care workers should be alert to the symptoms of depression in a new mother and encourage her to get treatment as necessary.

“Introduction to Pharmacology E-Book” by Mary Kaye Asperheim Favaro, Justin Favaro
from Introduction to Pharmacology E-Book
by Mary Kaye Asperheim Favaro, Justin Favaro
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Depressed older adults also tend to visit health care providers more than nondepressed older adults.

“Assisted Living Nursing: A Manual for Management and Practice” by Dr. Ethel Mitty, EdD, RN, Dr. Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Sandra Flores, RN
from Assisted Living Nursing: A Manual for Management and Practice
by Dr. Ethel Mitty, EdD, RN, Dr. Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP, FAAN, Sandra Flores, RN
Springer Publishing Company, 2009

But most patients are unlikely to divulge this information, so the clinician often must ask questions to discern the degree of depression.

“Clinical Exercise Physiology” by Jonathan K. Ehrman, Paul M. Gordon, Paul S. Visich, Steven Keteyian
from Clinical Exercise Physiology
by Jonathan K. Ehrman, Paul M. Gordon, et. al.
Human Kinetics, 2009

And these findings may not be limited to currently depressed parents; according to one meta-analysis, mothers with lifetime histories of depression are also more negative with their children (Lovejoy et al., 2000).

“Handbook of Depression, Second Edition” by Ian H. Gotlib, Constance L. Hammen
from Handbook of Depression, Second Edition
by Ian H. Gotlib, Constance L. Hammen
Guilford Publications, 2008

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Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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12 comments

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  • people take this audio and make gacha life videos out of it. and i don’t think that is right. because i think that they are quirking about this audio when, this girl has real depression.

  • Wow it was healthful and I talk to my child about my illnesses and my past experience and she has a guitar and a music keyboard and I even put her in ballet at time in her life so please right now I don’t have the funds to push forward with her activity because everything cost nowadays but believe I tell her things so she will know and it will be better days thanks for your interest I truly love commenting on your topics.Thanks

  • I have to say, mental health care is very costly. It cost me $150 each session. I have to pay rent and feed my children. I can’t afford mental health care. It’s so difficult to get affordable health care.

  • Video idea / suggestion: How to stop trying to ‘fix’ all relationships? I struggle with trying to keep all relationships in my life in a state of harmony, even when I don’t particularly like the people (housemates or workmates). As a result I feel like I’m acting fake and being nice and pandering to people I dislike (being my ‘fake self’). How to change this? How to accept disharmony in relationships and how to act around people who you dislike or feel hurt by when you are forced to spend time with them.

  • Romans respective about postpartum peoples that have problems dealing with their children’s basically putting up with they bad habits

  • She needs to find help so she can have some time for herself, I think a lot of moms feel selfish on some level for wanting alone time but it’s vital, mom needs to be ok for everyone else to be ok, and while alone time won’t cure depression it gives you opportunities to work on it. I say this only because I can relate to it but she’s overweight like I was, I was built just like that, and when I took control of my physical health my mental health for sure got stronger. It’s about finding that team of people who can step in and help so you can focus on you for a minute especially when you already have a mental illness. I’m bipolar so I know how hard this is for her to already be dealing with it and have so much piled on top of it.

  • I saw this video years ago while I was in bed falling asleep 30 min between crying and trying to find the strenght to kill myself. This put a light in my path, I felt every word she said, probably saved my life.
    Today, once again I’m struggling with all that old stuff, but I’m older and wiser. I came here because I know the things that made me feel better when I needed it the most.

  • Carrie Fisher was able to raise a daughter while being diagnosed with bipolar. If Carrie can raise a child, any parent can do the same thing.

  • How do explain to my 2 1/2 yr old son that when mommies sitting on the bed crying my eyes out that it’s not his fault and it’s just that I am severly depressed. He always says ” I’m sorry mommy, it’s ok.” And I hate that he has to see me like that because I’m afraid it’ll effect him negatively. I always have to tell him it’s not his fault. I just don’t know if he can understand at that age that there’s other things either in life or in my head that’s making me go into break down mode? I’ve been severly depressed since I was 13, I think. I’ve lived with this for so long I can’t even remember. But how do I explain it, should I even have to explain it at his age?

  • I watch this until I realized… This is what I feel… This is the pain that alot go through.. But my parents don’t understand!! My dad doesn’t believe me when I say I hide it… My mum isn’t the best either.. I’m a f*cked up 13 year old who is told I’m a bratty bish when I cry over something. I swear All The Time When I’m mad. But I don’t swear for fun… I swear because of anger, sadness and loneliness. Yes, I have friends… But most of them aren’t real! I get bullied for being me. No wonder I don’t trust ANYONE. I am adopted, and made fun because of that. It’s not okay. I pretend I’m okay.. But in not. I’m not okay!! I attempted so many times to die. I have even had bleach. I tell my parents about those attempts, but they don’t believe!!

  • you have to be careful to be that open because Social Services (so called Baby Snatchers) try to find any flaw in families even when there isnt any. They stick like ticks and drinks you blood. Had that experience myself

  • Every time someone brings up depression, I laugh and make a joke. People call me sick, and twisted for laughing at depression. What they don’t know is that I have depression. I laugh to cope. Hearing about self harm and depression triggers me, so I make jokes as I try hard to not to show that I am extremely upset and uncomfortable. If someone laughs at something related to depression, it’s probably a coping mechanism. Please don’t be rude to them. ��