More Evidence Links Weight problems to Liver Cancer

 

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More Evidence Linking Obesity to Liver Cancer. And type 2 diabetes more than doubles the odds, researchers say. Having a large waistline, a high body mass index (BMI) and type 2 diabetes, may raise your risk for liver cancer, a new study suggests. “We found that each of. More than 2,100 developed liver cancer, the study found.

After comparing rates of liver cancer among those who were obese and had diabetes and those who were obese but didn’t have diabetes, the researchers found that people with type 2 diabetes were 2.6 times more likely to. While the study found an association between obesity and liver cancer, it doesn’t prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship. Still, the findings support previous studies suggesting that obesity and diabetes may be contributing to the sharp increase. According to new research, however, obesity can also play a role in determining a person’s risk of developing liver problems. Published in the October 14 issue of the journal Cancer Research, the recent study determined that having a high body mass index (BMI) or large waistline increased a person’s risk for liver cancer.

More evidence linking obesity to liver cancer A new study has added substantial support to liver cancer being on the list of obesity-associated cancers –. Additional evidence has come to light linking obesity to liver cancer. The study found that a larger waistline, high body mass index, and type 2 diabetes increase a person’s risk for liver cancer. They found that obesity was linked with multiple cancers, including colon, rectum, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, kidney, stomach, esophagus, breast, uterus, cervix, ovary, and other sites. The researchers concluded that the pattern current then—in 1998—could account for 14% of cancer deaths in men and 20% of those in women.

that lead to cancer, such as increases in levels of certain hormones and inflammation. People who weigh more than recommended may increase their risk of some cancers. There are 13 types of cancer associated with overweight and obesity. About 55% of all cancers diagnosed in women and 24% of those diagnosed in men.

Liver cancer: People who are overweight or obese are up to twice as likely as normal-weight people to develop liver cancer. The association between overweight/obesity and liver cancer is stronger in men than women (11, 12).

List of related literature:

More limited evidence suggests that obesity may also increase the risk for cancer of the liver, pancreas, and stomach as well as some hematopoietic cancers.

“Goldman's Cecil Medicine,Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features and Print, Single Volume,24: Goldman's Cecil Medicine” by Russell La Fayette Cecil, Lee Goldman, Andrew I. Schafer
from Goldman’s Cecil Medicine,Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features and Print, Single Volume,24: Goldman’s Cecil Medicine
by Russell La Fayette Cecil, Lee Goldman, Andrew I. Schafer
Elsevier/Saunders, 2012

Given that the burden of chronic liver diseases is expected to rise because of increasing rates of alcoholism, hepatitis B and C infection, and obesity-related fatty liver disease, the incidence of HCC is also expected to rise in the coming decades.

“Practical Hepatic Pathology: A Diagnostic Approach E-Book: A Volume in the Pattern Recognition Series” by Romil Saxena
from Practical Hepatic Pathology: A Diagnostic Approach E-Book: A Volume in the Pattern Recognition Series
by Romil Saxena
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Many studies have been published since the > IARC report, and the accumulated evidence indicates that obesity may be a risk factor also for > pancreas cancer, > liver cancer, > gallbladder cancer, and hematopoietic cancers, and possibly for aggressive > prostate cancer.

“Encyclopedia of Cancer” by Manfred Schwab
from Encyclopedia of Cancer
by Manfred Schwab
Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2011

s obesity’s ties to multiple cancers Aº a new study suggests that inflammation may be the primary culprit in at least one malignancy: liver cancer.

“Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.” by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
from Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.
by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, 2010

The excess risk of liver cancer associated with overweight/obesity and diabetes has been related to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (Sanyal et al. 2010).

“Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health” by Roger Detels, Martin Gulliford, Quarraisha Abdool Karim, Chorh Chuan Tan
from Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health
by Roger Detels, Martin Gulliford, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2017

There is also evidence that some ingredients in the diet, such as animal fat and alcohol, can increase the risk of developing cancer, whereas certain compounds found in food items may reduce that risk.

“Karp's Cell and Molecular Biology” by Gerald Karp, Janet Iwasa, Wallace Marshall
from Karp’s Cell and Molecular Biology
by Gerald Karp, Janet Iwasa, Wallace Marshall
Wiley, 2020

Recent studies provide evidence that fatty liver may develop independent of insulin resistance and that liver-secreted cytokines may affect insulin signaling in muscle and adipose tissue [17].

“Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity: Current Status, Consequences and Prevention” by Debasis Bagchi
from Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity: Current Status, Consequences and Prevention
by Debasis Bagchi
Elsevier Science, 2010

In people, obesity has been shown to increase the risk of elevated liver enzymes, fatty liver, cirrhosis (end stage liver disease) and even hepatocellular carcinoma (liver cancer) (Marchesini et al., 2008).

“CANINE NUTRIGENOMICS: THE NEW SCIENCE OF FEEDING YOUR DOG FOR OPTIMUM HEALTH” by W. Jean Dodds, DVM, Diana Laverdure
from CANINE NUTRIGENOMICS: THE NEW SCIENCE OF FEEDING YOUR DOG FOR OPTIMUM HEALTH
by W. Jean Dodds, DVM, Diana Laverdure
Dogwise Publishing, 2014

Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome are also risk factors for carcinogenesis, and a multitude of cancers are increased in patients with NAFLD, including liver cancer, breast cancer, kidney cancer, and colon cancer, among others.

“Conn's Current Therapy 2019” by Rick D. Kellerman, David Rakel
from Conn’s Current Therapy 2019
by Rick D. Kellerman, David Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Diabetes mellitus and obesity have also been shown to contribute to hepatic carcinogenesis in patients with cirrhosis.

“Liver: A Complete Book on Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Diseases E-Book” by Mamun-Al Mahtab
from Liver: A Complete Book on Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Diseases E-Book
by Mamun-Al Mahtab
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I have to ask…. who the fck are the people in the audience of these talks?

    I ask this because the Government recommendations are not changing, my GP’s are not up to speed on these ideas, neither are the dietitians or exercise physiologists.

    How can I know more about this stuff from watching YouTube than the professionals, who are still recommending dietary information that is still messing up peoples bodies?

  • No one follows the USDA recommendations. How do I know that? The average American eats a diet of 37-45% cal. fat. With that fat intake they CANNOT be eating the USDA diet it is impossible!! Pritikin highlighted the lies of the US govt in the 1980’s.

  • If activating the PI3K gene (4 PIK3CA genes) via insulin/IGF1, causes more PIP3 cancer lipids.. how does the PTEN enzyme get rid of it? How is the P53 mechanism to suppress tumors different?

    So most tumors have a type of PI3K defect that causes any hyper-insulin-sensitivity, thus allowing glucose to fuel its growth.. but even a tumor with a normal PI3K gene, or one that’s been inhibited via a drug,  will still take in glucose when insulin is sufficiently high (type2 diabetes).. but why is a tumor not insulin-resistant? Is it the number of insulin receptors? In any case, inhibiting PI3K makes sense, but can cause hyperglycemia/diabetes and must be managed with a keto-diet/metformin/sglt2 inhibitors, etc. Interesting how the benefits of keto may be in the insulin reduction, not so much the ketones.

    If fruits / HFCS contain a 50/50 glucose /fructose mix, and it’s the liquid fructose that is able to get to the colon and knock out the APC gene which accelerates colon cancer  (via Fructokinase, lowering atp, AGES etc).. then is glucose’s role just to provide the carbons in the small intestines.. leading to a spike in blood sugar and insulin, fueling the tumor?

    is it possible that the liver’s insulin receptors can be knocked out / resistant (and disrupt the FOXO pathway), yet NOT affect the SREBP-1c pathway?

    I like the part that we probably evolved like bears.. become insulin resistance in the fall, allowing metabolism to slow and allow hibernation. The ability to metabolize lactose is the biggest difference between our hunter/gather ancestors!