Minority Women Less inclined to Get Cancer Of The Breast Screening

 

Breast Cancer in Women of Color: Disparities in Breast Cancer

Video taken from the channel: NYU Langone Health


 

Breast Cancer Screening & You: Segment 2

Video taken from the channel: American Cancer Society


 

Breast cancer screening for over 70s doesn’t prompt expected sharp fall in advanced disease

Video taken from the channel: The BMJ


 

Breast Cancer in Women of Color: Updates in Breast Cancer Screening

Video taken from the channel: NYU Langone Health


 

Minorities and Breast Cancer Mayo Clinic

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Minorities Less Likely To Get Screened for Breast Cancer

Video taken from the channel: Wochit News


 

Minorities less likely to know about breast cancer options

Video taken from the channel: Michigan Medicine


FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) Black and Hispanic women are less likely than white women to be screened for breast cancer, a large review finds. Screening rates for Asian/Pacific.

FRIDAY, Dec. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) Black and Hispanic women are less likely than white women to be screened for breast cancer, a large review finds. Screening rates for Asian/Pacific Islander and white women were similar, the research showed.

Minority women less likely to get breast cancer screening (HealthDay)—Black and Hispanic women are less likely than white women to be screened for breast cancer, a. Black and Hispanic women are less likely than white women to be screened for breast cancer, a large review finds. For a number of years, research has suggested that minority women were less likely than white women to have breast reconstruction. Many doctors believed this disparity was because minority women tended to live in areas with fewer plastic surgeons and had no insurance or.

The researchers found that Black women, women living in poverty, and women who said they did not trust the healthcare system were the least likely to report barriers to breast cancer screening and so were less likely to receive additional support. Black and Hispanic women and women without private insurance are more likely than white women and women with private insurance to obtain mammography screening at facilities with less favorable characteristics. A disparity in use of high-quality mammography may be contributing to disparities in breast cancer mortality.

African American women are nearly twice as likely as white women to be diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer, which is more aggressive and harder to treat than other subtypes of breast cancer. African Americans are more than twice as likely as whites to be diagnosed with and die from multiple myeloma. SAN JOSE, Calif. Minority women are less likely than white women to be adequately screened for breast cancer, a new study shows, and that disparity could account for. Women who live in rural areas are twice as likely to die from cervical cancer as women in urban areas.

Screening. Spanish-speaking Hispanic individuals are less likely to be screened for colorectal cancer than English-speaking Hispanic or white individuals. Asian American, American Indian and Alaska Native, and Hispanic women are less likely to.

List of related literature:

Certain minority women tend to have low compliance rates in the use of early screening methods for breast cancer.

“Maternity and Women's Health Care E-Book” by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, Mary Catherine Cashion, Kathryn Rhodes Alden
from Maternity and Women’s Health Care E-Book
by Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Shannon E. Perry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Screening for breast and cervical cancer among Hispanics is lower than among non-Hispanic whites, and the disparity is even greater among low-income and border residents (Coughlin et al., 2003).

“Planning Health Promotion Programs: An Intervention Mapping Approach” by L. Kay Bartholomew Eldredge, Guy S. Parcel, Gerjo Kok, Nell H. Gottlieb
from Planning Health Promotion Programs: An Intervention Mapping Approach
by L. Kay Bartholomew Eldredge, Guy S. Parcel, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

Unfortunately, racial and ethnic minority women are less likely than White women to receive adequate mammography screening, and African American women in particular are more likely to have advanced tumors on diagnosis than are women from all other racial and ethnic minority groups (Smith-Bindman et al., 2006).

“The Handbook of Health Behavior Change, Third Edition” by Sally A. Shumaker, PhD, Judith K. Ockene, PhD, MEd, MA, Kristin A. Riekert, PhD
from The Handbook of Health Behavior Change, Third Edition
by Sally A. Shumaker, PhD, Judith K. Ockene, PhD, MEd, MA, Kristin A. Riekert, PhD
Springer Publishing Company, 2008

The screening should begin earlier in women with high risk for breast cancer (including those having relatives with breast cancer).

“Encyclopedia of Women's Health” by Sana Loue, Martha Sajatovic
from Encyclopedia of Women’s Health
by Sana Loue, Martha Sajatovic
Springer US, 2004

In our population, a substantial percentage of young women received screening mammography, but few breast cancers were found, regardless of their specific age, race, or individual characteristics.

“Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.” by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
from Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.
by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, 2010

Women with an average risk of breast cancer should undergo regular screening mammography as below: a.

“Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2020 E-Book: 5 Books in 1” by Fred F. Ferri
from Ferri’s Clinical Advisor 2020 E-Book: 5 Books in 1
by Fred F. Ferri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Thus, because the risk of breast cancer in the female population is high, the additional risk from regular mammographic screening is extremely low in comparison.

“Patient Centered Care in Medical Imaging and Radiotherapy E-Book” by Aarthi Ramlaul, Martin Vosper
from Patient Centered Care in Medical Imaging and Radiotherapy E-Book
by Aarthi Ramlaul, Martin Vosper
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Additionally, we may adopt less frequent breast cancer screening in average risk women to further reduce the harms of screening.

“AACR 2016: Abstracts 1-2696” by American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
from AACR 2016: Abstracts 1-2696
by American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
CTI Meeting Technology, 2016

Population-based screening for breast and ovarian cancer risk due to BRCA1 and BRCA2.

“Handbook of Statistical Genomics” by David J. Balding, Ida Moltke, John Marioni
from Handbook of Statistical Genomics
by David J. Balding, Ida Moltke, John Marioni
Wiley, 2019

Although African American women are less likely than white women to be diagnosed with breast cancer, they are more likely to die from the disease, possibly because their cancers are less likely to be detected at an early stage.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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