Medication Safety as well as your Child

 

Medication Safety In Your Home

Video taken from the channel: Valley Health


 

Medication Safety & Communication

Video taken from the channel: patientsafetycanada


 

Medication Safety: A Patient’s Story

Video taken from the channel: cirSEIU


 

“Virtual Home Visit for a Child With Medical Complexity: Medication safety”

Video taken from the channel: OPENPediatrics


 

Medication Safety for Parents & Children

Video taken from the channel: KOLR10 News


 

Medication Mistakes In Kids Happen Too Frequently

Video taken from the channel: NationwideChildrens


 

Lock it Up: Medicine Safety in Your Home

Video taken from the channel: U.S. Food and Drug Administration


give your child any medicine to get him to sleep. give aspirin to children under 18 years of age. give your child vitamins or supplements that contain iron unless directed by a healthcare provider. Too much iron can be harmful to your child, especially if he is younger than 3 years. Medicines are the leading cause of child poisoning. In 2017, nearly 52,000 children under the age of six were seen in the emergency room for medicine poisoning. That’s one child every ten minutes.

Top Tips about Medication Safety. Keep medicine up and away, out of reach and sight of children, even medicine you take every day. We all know that medications can help our children live healthier lives, but when medicines are misused or stored improperly, they can also be dangerous. You will want to follow all the medication safety guidelines for adults, but if you have infants or children in your home, here are some special medication safety reminders just.

Always use the infant formulations; never give your baby a medication intended for older kids or adults. To prevent choking, don’t squeeze baby’s cheeks, hold his nose or force his head back when offering him medicine. If your baby is old enough to sit up, dispense the medicine with baby in a sitting position. Put a childproof lock or catch on the cabinet with your medicines. Put away medicine safely after every use.

Never leave medicine on the counter. Curious children will climb on a chair to reach for something that interests them. DO NOT leave your medicine unattended. Children can find medicine in your bedside.

Talk to Your Kids about Medicine Safety Teach your child that medicine should always be given by an adult. It’s important for kids to know that they should not take medicine on their own. Parents and caregivers can help make sure they are taking it correctly. Please give the initial dose of any medication your child has not had before to check for a reaction.

All medication must be in the original container, labeled with the child’s name and the date it is brought to the center. Prescription medication must include dosage instructions and child’s name. Expired medication will not be. Learning about medication safety can reduce and even prevent the risk of harm for you and your loved ones. Adverse Drug Events in the United States Updated Estimates of Emergency Room Visits for Adverse Drug Events.

Correct Answer: Adults can use aspirin to treat pain and fever, but you should never give it to a child. It can cause a serious condition called Reye’s syndrome that can harm the brain and liver. Don’t give your child acetaminophen when he or she is taking other medications containing acetaminophen.

Don’t give your child adult formulations of acetaminophen. Securely replace child-resistant caps after using medication and store all medication in its original container out of your child’s reach.

List of related literature:

This safety measure is designed to keep your child from receiving two different medications that may be harmful when taken together.

“Parenting For Dummies” by Sandra Hardin Gookin, Dan Gookin, May Jo Shaw, Tim Cavell
from Parenting For Dummies
by Sandra Hardin Gookin, Dan Gookin, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

• If the child has to take a prescribed medication on his or her own, leave only 1 or 2 doses accessible to the child at a time.

“All-in-One Nursing Care Planning Resource E-Book: Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, and Psychiatric-Mental Health” by Pamela L. Swearingen, Jacqueline Wright
from All-in-One Nursing Care Planning Resource E-Book: Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, and Psychiatric-Mental Health
by Pamela L. Swearingen, Jacqueline Wright
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

(1) All drugs should be purchased in child-proof packages if available (2) All drugs, medicines and toxic substances should be kept in locked cabinets (3) Keep caps and tops on bottles properly closed (4) Directions on the label must be followed when giving or taking medicines.

“APC Textbook of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology Avichal Publishing Company” by Anil Aggrawal, Avichal Publishing Company
from APC Textbook of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology Avichal Publishing Company
by Anil Aggrawal, Avichal Publishing Company
Avichal Publishing Company,

• If the child has to take prescribed medication on his or her own, leave only 1 or 2 doses accessible to the child at a time.

“All-in-One Nursing Care Planning Resource: Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, and Psychiatric-Mental Health” by Pamela L. Swearingen
from All-in-One Nursing Care Planning Resource: Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, and Psychiatric-Mental Health
by Pamela L. Swearingen
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Medications should have childproof caps and should be kept in a locked cabinet.

“Essentials of Pediatric Nursing” by Theresa Kyle, Susan Carman
from Essentials of Pediatric Nursing
by Theresa Kyle, Susan Carman
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2019

lt is essential for your child’s safety that this or any other medication changes be done under a doctor’s supervision.

“Freeing Your Child from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Powerful, Practical Program for Parents of Children and Adolescents” by Tamar Chansky, Ph.D.
from Freeing Your Child from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Powerful, Practical Program for Parents of Children and Adolescents
by Tamar Chansky, Ph.D.
Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale, 2011

As these medicines are appealing to children, pharmacists must advise parents about the safe storage of medicines in the home.

“Pharmaceutical Practice E-Book” by Arthur J. Winfield, Judith Rees, Ian Smith
from Pharmaceutical Practice E-Book
by Arthur J. Winfield, Judith Rees, Ian Smith
Elsevier Health Sciences UK, 2009

The patient in hold, restraint or seclusion should be monitored continuously by staff, and the physician must monitor the child’s physical health and comfort and ensure the child is safe.

“Lewis's Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: A Comprehensive Textbook” by Andrés Martin, Fred R. Volkmar, Michael H. Bloch
from Lewis’s Child and Adolescent Psychiatry: A Comprehensive Textbook
by Andrés Martin, Fred R. Volkmar, Michael H. Bloch
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2017

The patient or caregiver must understand the treatmentand/or medication-related instructions, especially those related to safety measures, such as keeping all medications out of the reach of children.

“Pharmacology and the Nursing Process E-Book” by Linda Lane Lilley, Shelly Rainforth Collins, Julie S. Snyder
from Pharmacology and the Nursing Process E-Book
by Linda Lane Lilley, Shelly Rainforth Collins, Julie S. Snyder
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

This can help prevent medication errors and ensure that the child and family will follow the physician’s orders for the home treatment plan.

“Maternal-Child Nursing E-Book” by Emily Slone McKinney, Susan R. James, Sharon Smith Murray, Kristine Nelson, Jean Ashwill
from Maternal-Child Nursing E-Book
by Emily Slone McKinney, Susan R. James, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Wow. this is very sad.I keep searching for answers through other parents who have experienced the loss of a child. My son Andrew passed away on July 4th 2016. I was told very little so I just assumed he was fine when he went to the hospital in Nov (2015) but he remained in multiple facilities over the course of those next eight months. After obtaining medical records (after becoming the administrator of estate) in Nov (2016) I found out just how much he had actually endured. Things that I HAD NOT BEEN TOLD.. I commend you. Andrew was 26.