Males Are in danger of Cancer Of The Breast, Too

 

Men Get Breast Cancer Too

Video taken from the channel: Everyday Health


 

Georgia man learns men can develop breast cancer, too

Video taken from the channel: FOX 5 Atlanta


 

What can men do to reduce their risk for breast cancer?

Video taken from the channel: Premier Health


 

Breast Cancer Does Not Discriminate against Men

Video taken from the channel: The Doctors


 

Men can get breast cancer, too

Video taken from the channel: UW Medicine


 

Mayo Clinic Minute: Breast cancer strikes men, too

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Men Can Get Breast Cancer, Too

Video taken from the channel: DukeCancerInstitute


Risk Factors for Breast Cancer in Men Aging. Aging is an important risk factor for the development of breast cancer in men. The risk of breast cancer goes up Family history of breast cancer. Breast cancer risk is increased if other members of the family (blood relatives) have Inherited gene. About one in 833 men are at risk of getting breast cancer in their lifetime, which on average is diagnosed at about age 72.

Unlike women’s breasts, men’s breasts don’t contain functional milk ducts and glands where breast cancer commonly to begin to develop, but men’s breast tissue does contain cells that can become cancer and spread to other areas of the body. These men were at increased risk of breast cancer due to their genetics, race or ethnicity, prior radiation exposure, hormone imbalances or other medical factors, said lead researcher Dr. Yiming. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations put women at high risk for breast and ovarian cancers, but these mutations also increase men’s risk for certain cancers. “If a male has a BRCA mutation, their risk. It’s rare for a man under age 35 to get breast cancer.

A man’s chance of getting breast cancer goes up with age. Most breast cancers happen to men between ages 60 and 70. A man who carries the BRCA2 mutation faces a 7% risk of developing breast cancer in his lifetime, she says. In contrast, the chance that the average American man will. Breast cancer is about 100 times less common among white men than among white women.

It is about 70 times less common among Black men than Black women. As in Black women, Black men with breast cancer tend to have a worse prognosis (outlook). For men, the lifetime risk of getting breast cancer is about 1 in 833. Breast cancer occurs mainly in women, but men can get it, too.

Many people do not realize that men have breast tissue and that they can develop breast cancer. Cells in nearly any part of the body can become cancer and can spread to other areas. Breast cancer starts when cells in. The Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool allows health professionals to estimate a woman’s risk of developing invasive breast cancer over the next 5 years and up to age 90 (lifetime risk).. The tool uses a woman’s personal medical and reproductive history and the history of breast cancer among her first-degree relatives (mother, sisters, daughters) to estimate absolute breast cancer risk—her.

However, in Breast Cancer Awareness Month, often times the male population is not involved in the conversation when, contrary to popular belief, men are also victims of this scourge, although the incidence is much lower because less than 1 percent of all cases occur in men.

List of related literature:

Although breast cancer can develop in both genders, women are at greatly increased risk and breast cancer in men is uncommon.

“Sabiston Textbook of Surgery E-Book” by Courtney M. Townsend, R. Daniel Beauchamp, B. Mark Evers, Kenneth L. Mattox
from Sabiston Textbook of Surgery E-Book
by Courtney M. Townsend, R. Daniel Beauchamp, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

However, most breast cancers occur in women whose only risk factors are age and gender.

“Introduction to Pathology for the Physical Therapist Assistant” by Jahangir Moini, Casey Chaney
from Introduction to Pathology for the Physical Therapist Assistant
by Jahangir Moini, Casey Chaney
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Women are at far greater risk than men, with 99% of breast cancers occurring in women.

“Lewis's Medical-Surgical Nursing E-Book: Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems, Single Volume” by Mariann M. Harding, Jeffrey Kwong, Dottie Roberts, Debra Hagler, Courtney Reinisch
from Lewis’s Medical-Surgical Nursing E-Book: Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems, Single Volume
by Mariann M. Harding, Jeffrey Kwong, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Breast cancer occurs in males (see the “Breast cancer in men” sidebar in this chapter for more information); however, in the United States, approximately 44,000 women get breast cancer annually compared to only 1,500 men.

“Breast Cancer For Dummies” by Ronit Elk, Monica Morrow
from Breast Cancer For Dummies
by Ronit Elk, Monica Morrow
Wiley, 2011

Not unexpectedly, both the American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) and the American Cancer Society (ACS) have concluded that soyfoods are safe for breast cancer patients.

“History of the Soyfoods Movement Worldwide (1960s-2019): Extensively Annotated Bibliography and Sourcebook” by William Shurtleff; Akiko Aoyagi
from History of the Soyfoods Movement Worldwide (1960s-2019): Extensively Annotated Bibliography and Sourcebook
by William Shurtleff; Akiko Aoyagi
Soyinfo Center, 2019

Breast Cancer Breast cancer, although more prevalent in women, is also diagnosed in men, but to a lesser extent.

“Acute Care Handbook for Physical Therapists E-Book” by Jaime C. Paz, Michele P. West
from Acute Care Handbook for Physical Therapists E-Book
by Jaime C. Paz, Michele P. West
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Gender breast cancer, although the incidence in males is less than 1% of the incidence in females, with 1720 cases of invasive breast cancer anticipated in 2006 (out of a total burden of 215,000 estimated cases).

“Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: Expert Consult Premium Edition: Enhanced Online Features” by Courtney M. Townsend Jr., R. Daniel Beauchamp, B. Mark Evers, Kenneth L. Mattox
from Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: Expert Consult Premium Edition: Enhanced Online Features
by Courtney M. Townsend Jr., R. Daniel Beauchamp, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

Gender The age-adjusted breast cancer incidence rate is approximately 100 times higher in women than in men in the United States, a ratio that is fairly consistent around the world, although some reports suggest that the incidence of male breast cancer might be several fold higher in some African countries.”

“Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8” by Waun Ki Hong, Robert C. Bast Jr, American Association for Cancer Research, William Hait, Donald W. Kufe, James F. Holland, Emil Frei Iii
from Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8
by Waun Ki Hong, Robert C. Bast Jr, et. al.
People’s Medical Publishing House, 2010

Women with a personal history of breast cancer, a family history of breast cancer, a genetic mutation known to increase the risk of breast cancer (such as BRCA), and women who have had radiation therapy to the chest before the age of 30 are at a higher risk for breast cancer, not average risk.

“Potter and Perry's Fundamentals of Nursing: Second South Asia Edition E-Book” by Sharma Suresh
from Potter and Perry’s Fundamentals of Nursing: Second South Asia Edition E-Book
by Sharma Suresh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Nearly 231,840 patients develop breast cancer per year in the United States, and less than 1% of cases are reported in men.

“The Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics” by Pavan Bhat, Alexandra Dretler, Mark Gdowski, Rajeev Ramgopal, Dominique Williams
from The Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics
by Pavan Bhat, Alexandra Dretler, et. al.
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • I don’t have a lump (yet) but all of the sudden today my nipple started to itch. And now that i touch the center of my nipple it hurts a little. Maybe a number 3 pain? Hoping it’s not breast cancer but if it is, it’s better to treat it soon. Survival rates in early breast cancers are higher, don’t wait until other symptoms start.

  • I’m 19 and I’ve noticed the lump in my right pec since I was about 13. I figured it was just gyno as it’s painless and hasn’t bothered me at all, I forget it’s there most days. But recently I’ve become more worried. What should I do??

  • Like the top comment I want to re-emphasise that if you are a teenager and you have a lump under your nipple it is probably gynocomastia and you do not need to worry. 1 in 10 boys get it in puberty.