Makeup of Germs in Newborn’s Gut May Triple Allergy, Bronchial asthma Risk

 

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HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) A relatively rare abnormality in the makeup of germs in an infant ‘s gut may triple the risk for allergies and asthma in childhoo. TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) A relatively rare abnormality in the makeup of germs in an infant’s gut may triple the risk for allergies and asthma in childhood, new research warns.

Millions of bacteria and fungi can be found in everyone’s gut, but the new study suggests that an out-of-whack combination of bugs, present in less than 10 percent of newborns, may undermine. TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News)—A relatively rare abnormality in the makeup of germs in an infant’s gut may triple the risk for allergies and asthma in. Makeup of germs in newborn’s gut may triple allergy, asthma risk (HealthDay)—A relatively rare abnormality in the makeup of germs in an infant’s gut may triple the risk for allergies and asthma in.

TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 A relatively rare abnormality in the makeup of germs in an infant’s gut may triple the risk for allergies and asthma in childhood, new research warns. A relatively rare abnormality in the makeup of germs in an infant’s gut may triple the risk for allergies and asthma in childhood, new research warns.

Cutting-edge genetic testing. Altering gut bacteria may one day be a way to prevent asthma in some cases,” says Sandra Gawchik, D.O., co-chief of the Department of Allergy and Immunology at Crozer-Keystone Health System. New Research Points to the Bacteria-Asthma Connection.

In a recent study, researchers looked at the makeup of gut bacteria in infants born from mothers. Newborns exposed to household germs, pet and rodent dander and roach allergens during their first year of life appear to have lower risk of developing asthma and allergies. The researchers note, however, that the protective effects of these exposures disappear when infants encounter these substances after their first year.

According to a HealthDay article, new research has found a rare abnormality in the makeup of bacteria and fungi in an infant’s gut may triple. Microbes in an infant’s gut may influence immune cell function and subsequent development of allergy and asthma. The findings suggest that altering gut microbial composition early in life might be a potential strategy for disease prevention.

List of related literature:

Similarly recent findings report that breast feeding was protective against some asthma phenotypes but not hay fever, atopic eczema or IgE (Karmaus and others 2003).

“Handbook of Food Products Manufacturing, 2 Volume Set” by Y. H. Hui, Ramesh C. Chandan, Stephanie Clark, Nanna A. Cross, Joannie C. Dobbs, W. Jeffrey Hurst, Leo M. L. Nollet, Eyal Shimoni, Nirmal Sinha, Erika B. Smith, Somjit Surapat, Fidel Toldrá, Alan Titchenal
from Handbook of Food Products Manufacturing, 2 Volume Set
by Y. H. Hui, Ramesh C. Chandan, et. al.
Wiley, 2007

Reduced diversity or aberrant composition of the infant gut microbiota may be associated with the development of asthma in later life, so breastfeeding is recommended to ensure growth of healthy microbiota (Milani et al, 2017; Hendaus et al, 2016).

“Krause and Mahan’s Food and the Nutrition Care Process E-Book” by Janice L Raymond, Kelly Morrow
from Krause and Mahan’s Food and the Nutrition Care Process E-Book
by Janice L Raymond, Kelly Morrow
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

However, there is no evidence that viral infections of the respiratory tract protect against either allergies or asthma, and in fact, as previously described, bronchiolitis and pneumonias in infancy indicate an increased risk of subsequent asthma.

“Pediatric Allergy: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Donald Y. M. Leung, Hugh Sampson, Raif Geha, Stanley J. Szefler
from Pediatric Allergy: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Donald Y. M. Leung, Hugh Sampson, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Approximately half of infants with atopic dermatitis will develop asthma, and two-thirds will develop allergic rhinitis.

“Pediatric Secrets E-Book” by Richard A. Polin, Mark F. Ditmar
from Pediatric Secrets E-Book
by Richard A. Polin, Mark F. Ditmar
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

It has been found that those children who have enhanced responsiveness to allergens (produce more immunoglobulins) in the neonatal period (Warner 2004) have been associated with a later risk of developing allergies such as asthma.

“A Textbook of Children's and Young People's Nursing E-Book” by Edward Alan Glasper, Dr Jim Richardson, James Richardson
from A Textbook of Children’s and Young People’s Nursing E-Book
by Edward Alan Glasper, Dr Jim Richardson, James Richardson
Elsevier Health Sciences UK, 2010

About half of infants with atopic dermatitis will develop asthma, and two thirds will develop allergic rhinitis.

“Pediatric Secrets E-Book” by Richard A. Polin, Mark F. Ditmar
from Pediatric Secrets E-Book
by Richard A. Polin, Mark F. Ditmar
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

The key study linking allergen exposure in infancy to the subsequent development of asthma is that of Sporik et al. (1990) who followed 67 children with a family history of atopy.

“Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health” by Roger Detels, Martin Gulliford, Quarraisha Abdool Karim, Chorh Chuan Tan
from Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health
by Roger Detels, Martin Gulliford, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2017

In a recent analysis of approximately 400 observational studies, it was shown that a history of breastfeeding was associated with a reduction in the risk of acute otitis media, nonspecific gastroenteritis, severe lower respiratory tract infections, atopic dermatitis and asthma in young children [18].

“Common Cold” by Ronald Eccles, Olaf Weber
from Common Cold
by Ronald Eccles, Olaf Weber
Birkhäuser Basel, 2009

It is known that some infections may have a protective role in preventing the initiation of asthma in early childhood.33 Children who are exposed to more infections in early life, such as those with older siblings or children living on farms, are less likely to develop allergic disease.

“Nunn's Applied Respiratory Physiology E-Book” by Andrew B. Lumb
from Nunn’s Applied Respiratory Physiology E-Book
by Andrew B. Lumb
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Risk factors for acute wheezing in infants and children: viruses, passive smoke, and IgE antibodies to inhalant allergens.

“Crofton and Douglas's Respiratory Diseases” by Anthony Seaton, A. Gordon Leitch, Douglas Seaton
from Crofton and Douglas’s Respiratory Diseases
by Anthony Seaton, A. Gordon Leitch, Douglas Seaton
Wiley, 2008

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
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  • My children played outdoors more than indoors. They played in the dirt, climbed trees, rode bicycles and horses, played with dogs, cats, pigs and chooks and played sport. They also had chores, a healthy diet and when appropriate smacks. All eight have grown up to be healthy, strong and with a great work ethic. During their childhood they all thought they were deprived because they didn’t get fast food and only occasionally sweets (lollies or candy) and soft drinks (soda). They also thought they were victims of child labour. Children need a balanced life.

  • You also crippling immune system with vaccinations. The increased amount of vaccinations also causes our immune system to be hypersensitive why do they never look at these things?