Let us Support Nurses around the Front Lines from the COVID-19 Pandemic

 

Mental Health Support for COVID-19 Health Care Workers

Video taken from the channel: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


 

Front-line nurses say they don’t feel safe during the pandemic

Video taken from the channel: CBC News: The National


 

NYC ritual offers support to front line heroes during COVID-19 crisis

Video taken from the channel: Northwell Health


 

Front line nurses in COVID-19 pandemic find solace in ‘Hope Huddles’

Video taken from the channel: Northwell Health


 

Training nurses for the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic

Video taken from the channel: FOX 8 News Cleveland


 

Coronavirus outbreak: Registered nurse describes working on the front line amid COVID-19 pandemic

Video taken from the channel: Global News


 

COVID-19 Resilience Tips from a Front-Line ICU Nurse

Video taken from the channel: Mount Sinai Health System


Let’s Support Nurses on the Front Lines of the COVID-19 Pandemic. As a nurse, I want to be there for my patients during this pandemic. Here’s what nurses need to get the job done.

Last Thursday, I put an OOO message up on my HealthyWomen email, entrusted my team to carry on for the day, and reported to my hospital, Hackensack Meridian Health Riverview Medical Center, in. As the pandemic wears on, it’s way too easy for the rest of the world to forget about the nurses toiling in ICUs and other areas stretched to the limit by COVID-19. Make up for that by being sure. What could the public do to show support to our nurses who are at the front lines of this pandemic? The public can support nurses in two primary ways.

Nurses, as well as all health care professionals, have experienced severe shortages in personal protective equipment as they work on the front lines to provide vital care to COVID-19 patients. Powerful Stories From Nurses on the Front Lines of COVID-19 more than 30 people showed up to share their support. and both help on the front lines of the pandemic in the ICU at. While nurses and doctors head in to work long hours, they are on the front lines of the fight against COVID-19. In the midst of the pandemic, the community is. Here are 16 ways to support nurses during the COVID-19 global pandemic. #1.

Give gratitude with ‘Operation Thank A Nurse.’ Pamela Nye, a retired Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS), started ‘Operation Thank A Nurse‘ because she wanted more nurses to hear the word “thank you” for their service. A nurse’s notes from the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic. (COVID-19) has presented such a challenge to nurses. The pandemic brings a whole new level of complexity to our job. Here are some of my observations from the field, community support during COVID-19 pandemic.

A group of nurses working the front lines amid the coronavirus pandemic at a German hospital. As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) pandemic takes hold, nurses are on the front line of health and social care in the most extreme of circumstances. We reflect during a moment in time (week three of lockdown in the UK and week 5/6 across Europe) to highlight the issues facing nurses at this unprecedented time.

Pharmacy on the Front Lines of the COVID-19 Pandemic; Add To Favorites let alone a student on a rotation. Read My Story. Link the whole card. nursing staff, and other colleagues during a very stressful time working the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read My Story.

List of related literature:

This was essential to avoid chaos: already, various areas affected by the pandemic were beginning to bid against one another for nurses.”

“America's Forgotten Pandemic: The Influenza of 1918” by Alfred W. Crosby, American Council of Learned Societies
from America’s Forgotten Pandemic: The Influenza of 1918
by Alfred W. Crosby, American Council of Learned Societies
Cambridge University Press, 2003

Health and human service workers represent the “frontlines” if and when pandemic influenza strikes; further, they can be vectors for the infection.

“Canadian Community as Partner: Theory & Multidisciplinary Practice” by Ardene Robinson Vollman, Elizabeth T. Anderson, Judith M. McFarlane
from Canadian Community as Partner: Theory & Multidisciplinary Practice
by Ardene Robinson Vollman, Elizabeth T. Anderson, Judith M. McFarlane
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007
from the perspective ofthe nursing leadership and hospital management, the nurses should accept patient assignments during a pandemic unless they are sick or the environment is unsafe.

“Concepts and Cases in Nursing Ethics Third Edition” by Michael Yeo, Anne Moorhouse, Pamela Kahn, Patricia Rodney
from Concepts and Cases in Nursing Ethics Third Edition
by Michael Yeo, Anne Moorhouse, et. al.
Broadview Press, 2010

To address supply chain shortfalls, the 14 member hospitals of the Northern Virginia Hospital Alliance (NVHA) agreed to follow CDC respirator guidelines until no longer practical.

“Preventing Transmission of Pandemic Influenza and Other Viral Respiratory Diseases: Personal Protective Equipment for Healthcare Personnel: Update 2010” by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Healthcare Personnel to Prevent Transmission of Pandemic Influenza and Other Viral Respiratory Infections: Current Research Issues, Catharyn T. Liverman, Elaine L. Larson
from Preventing Transmission of Pandemic Influenza and Other Viral Respiratory Diseases: Personal Protective Equipment for Healthcare Personnel: Update 2010
by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2011

In earlier experiences101-106 critical care units play a key role in an organised response to a pandemic, particularly an airborne one such as influenza, where critical care units are often more severely affected than other clinical areas of a hospital.

“Critical Care Nursing” by Leanne Aitken, Andrea Marshall, Wendy Chaboyer
from Critical Care Nursing
by Leanne Aitken, Andrea Marshall, Wendy Chaboyer
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

The international response helped to organize systems of care, attempting to prevent Ebola-positive patients from entering hospitals, creating holding units for unconfirmed suspects, and organizing Ebola treatment units (ETUs).

“Pregnant in the Time of Ebola: Women and Their Children in the 2013-2015 West African Epidemic” by David A. Schwartz, Julienne Ngoundoung Anoko, Sharon A. Abramowitz
from Pregnant in the Time of Ebola: Women and Their Children in the 2013-2015 West African Epidemic
by David A. Schwartz, Julienne Ngoundoung Anoko, Sharon A. Abramowitz
Springer International Publishing, 2019

Before the pandemic began, the New York nurses’ union and a coalition of community organizations were fighting a hospital closure in the Bronx, and some of the other residents and I had just started trying to think about ways to support their campaign.

“There Is No Outside: Covid-19 Dispatches” by Verso Books
from There Is No Outside: Covid-19 Dispatches
by Verso Books
Verso Books, 2020

Staff nurses on the units don’t have the time to monitor IVs for infection, infiltration, and other problems.

“From Silence to Voice: What Nurses Know and Must Communicate to the Public” by Bernice Buresh, Suzanne Gordon, Patricia Benner
from From Silence to Voice: What Nurses Know and Must Communicate to the Public
by Bernice Buresh, Suzanne Gordon, Patricia Benner
ILR Press/Cornell University Press, 2006

Along with the Red Cross work in the war, the work of the nurses during the pandemic established the importance of public health nurses and raised their status.59

“In Search of Nella Larsen: A Biography of the Color Line” by George Hutchinson
from In Search of Nella Larsen: A Biography of the Color Line
by George Hutchinson
Harvard University Press, 2009

The work of these dedicated and selfless medics deserves our readers’ support!

“Managing Cultural Differences: Global Leadership Strategies for Cross-cultural Business Success” by Robert T. Moran, Philip Robert Harris, Sarah Virgilia Moran
from Managing Cultural Differences: Global Leadership Strategies for Cross-cultural Business Success
by Robert T. Moran, Philip Robert Harris, Sarah Virgilia Moran
Butterworth-Heinemann, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

2 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • It’s like that at urgent cares, we don’t get paid anymore for this, and protocols sometimes change multiple times a day not just everyday. At my work they put our covid cart with everything to test people waiting outside in our break room. So everything goes through our break room. Gowns hanging up everywhere in our break room so many people have quit or gone on leave. It’s crazy

  • So as a nurse I can say that surgical masks get wet with the wearers vapor very easily. Also this is saying that 2 masks need to suffice between patients. Also human beings need to ingest water and go the washroom. This is an impossible position. It is very poor infection control to wear a mask when using the washroom and reusing a mask after dealing with essential things like drinking etc is very unsafe with a high risk of contamination. Forget the hazard pay. Get adequate PPE. BC has developed criteria in how to manage PPE resources based on 6 stages of shortages/low supply. We are currently at stage 4. Stage 6 is health care workers wearing homemade cloth masks. This is potentially a death sentence and something that should never be happening considering a serious pandemic was always know to be an eventuality and that governments were made aware of this by experts.