Let us Start Preparing In Advance for Menopause Much Like We All Do for Pregnancy

 

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Let’s Start Planning Ahead for Menopause—Just Like We Do for Pregnancy. By Barb DePree, MD, NCMP,MMM. talked with our physicians and planned ahead on what we could do to improve pregnancy outcomes before becoming pregnant? We should be reading, asking and planning for menopause in advance too—at least if we want to optimize the outcome. You can, however, get pregnant during perimenopause, or the lead-up to menopause.

During perimenopause, women can have irregular periods, along with other perimenopausal symptoms, for. Once you’re postmenopausal, your hormone levels have changed enough that your ovaries won’t release any more eggs. You can no longer get. Many women may believe that pregnancy and menopause can’t happen together.

It is seen as the point in which the childbearing years are over, along with the monthly menstrual cycle. But getting pregnant in the pre-menopausal phase naturally is possible, and modern fertility technology makes post-menopause with IVF possible. Preventing pregnancy during menopause.

Experts don’t recommend that women over the age of 40 take birth control pills to prevent conception during or after menopause. In most cases, doctors are more likely to suggest the use of a diaphragm, an intrauterine device (IUD) or, as a permanent option. During this transition, the body is preparing for menopause and the ovaries are beginning to produce less estrogen. Most women experience perimenopause during their forties, but it may also start in their thirties, or even before.This phase stops when menopause starts, usually several years after the. Hot flashes and night sweats are commonly associated with menopause, but they may also be early signs of pregnancy.

During a hot flash, you’ll feel. Most women would expect their menopause to start around their 40’s, and so plot out the time for when they’d like to start trying for babies. But for the then 22-year-old Kim, her future was bleak: she was diagnosed with premature ovarian failurewhich, in her words, meant she had early menopause.

Pregnancy and menopause are two important phases in a woman’s life which share a number of similar symptoms. Both these are influenced by hormonal changes; the only difference being the fact that pregnancy involves an increase in hormones and menopause involves a decline of the same. For a 25 year old, those symptoms could not indicate menopause and likewise, for a 50 year old, they. Stomach complaints like bloating, gas, and constipation are another common issue, since the hormonal changes of menopause may cause your digestion to slow down.

If you are suffering from these effects, adopting clean eating habits of eating small meals 5-6 times a day, drinking LOTS of water, avoiding refined foods, and eating slowly may help.

List of related literature:

I’d just rather skip this menopause thing altogether!”

“Estrogen's Storm Season: stories of perimenopause” by Jerilynn C. Prior
from Estrogen’s Storm Season: stories of perimenopause
by Jerilynn C. Prior
CeMCOR (Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research),

I don’t want to go into early menopause.

“Woman: An Intimate Geography” by Natalie Angier
from Woman: An Intimate Geography
by Natalie Angier
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1999

There’s another way of looking at menopause, though.

“Menopause For Dummies” by Marcia L. Jones, Theresa Eichenwald, Nancy W. Hall
from Menopause For Dummies
by Marcia L. Jones, Theresa Eichenwald, Nancy W. Hall
Wiley, 2011

When menopause is upon us (that is, when we have stopped ovulating), our progesterone level will decline to almost zero.9 A reasonable question would be, “Why do some women experience this sooner than others?”

“The Estrogen Alternative: A Guide to Natural Hormonal Balance” by Raquel Martin, Judi Gerstung
from The Estrogen Alternative: A Guide to Natural Hormonal Balance
by Raquel Martin, Judi Gerstung
Inner Traditions/Bear, 2004

Unless you have specific, extenuating circumstances (only about 6% of American women do), a natural menopause may be the best.

“Linda Page's Healthy Healing: A Guide To Self-Healing For Everyone” by Linda Page
from Linda Page’s Healthy Healing: A Guide To Self-Healing For Everyone
by Linda Page
Healthy Healing Publications, 2004

Unless you have specific, extenuating circumstances (only about 6% of American women do), a natural menopause may be the best way.

“Linda Page's Healthy Healing: A Guide to Self-healing for Everyone” by Linda G. Rector-Page
from Linda Page’s Healthy Healing: A Guide to Self-healing for Everyone
by Linda G. Rector-Page
Traditional Wisdom, 2000

Menopause should be an opportunity for women to strive for a healthy, long life, and nurses can help to make this opportunity a reality.

“Maternity and Pediatric Nursing” by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
from Maternity and Pediatric Nursing
by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

For some women, menopause is a welcome change, eliminating their menstrual cycle and the need for contraception.

“New Dimensions In Women's Health” by Linda Alexander, Judith LaRosa, Helaine Bader, Susan Garfield
from New Dimensions In Women’s Health
by Linda Alexander, Judith LaRosa, et. al.
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2009

Women may wish to try to avoid taking hormones and wait for the ‘natural’ menopause, when their symptoms may be less severe.

“Llewellyn-Jones Fundamentals of Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book” by Jeremy J N Oats, Suzanne Abraham
from Llewellyn-Jones Fundamentals of Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book
by Jeremy J N Oats, Suzanne Abraham
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Also implement a daily exercise regimen to help the symptoms of menopause become more tolerable.

“Energy Healing: The Essentials of Self-Care” by Ann Marie Chiasson, Andrew Weil
from Energy Healing: The Essentials of Self-Care
by Ann Marie Chiasson, Andrew Weil
Sounds True, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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