Let us Safeguard Women That Are Pregnant as well as their Babies From Domestic Violence

 

Is Fighting During Pregnancy Harming Your Baby?

Video taken from the channel: Bailey Gaddis


 

Domestic violence can worsen during pregnancy

Video taken from the channel: WUSA9


 

Protecting Pregnant Women and Babies During Public Health Emergencies

Video taken from the channel: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


 

The Impact of Violence Against Women on Maternal Health

Video taken from the channel: WoodrowWilsonCenter


 

Mother of slain pregnant woman shares message with victims of domestic violence

Video taken from the channel: 11Alive


 

What Happens When Women are Abused During Pregnancy?

Video taken from the channel: dailyRx


 

Effects of intimate partner violence on maternal and fetal health

Video taken from the channel: Demystifying Medicine


Though some studies show that pregnancy can lead to a decrease in violence (from about a 15 percent prevalence to a 10 percent prevalence of domestic violence), [6] a pregnancy announcement still can result in a significant increase in a woman’s risk of severe physical abuse or homicide, said Bergin. Abuse of any kind can cause negative health effects for the mother, including frequent urinary tract. Let’s raise awareness of the effects of domestic violence on pregnancy, and in doing so, help women obtain a healthier, more stable life.

They may not be able to speak out, but we can. The Society for Women’s Health Research recently launched a campaign, Beyond the Bruises, to educate the public on the link between domestic violence and chronic diseases. Pregnancy & Abuse. Deciding if and when to have a child with a partner is a big decision. Pregnancy and parenthood cause physical, emotional, financial and social changes, which can become even more challenging when your partner is abusive toward you.

If you are pregnant and in an abusive relationship, you deserve to prioritize your safety. Some of the problems associated to domestic violence during pregnancy are femicide, abortion, infant mortality, obstetric complications, infant morbidity, and mental health problems for the mother, as well as risk behaviors, and deterioration of mother-child attachment [5–12]. recognised”,’2. As domestic violence may result in fatalities, most commonly of the woman although also of the perpetratori3, it is an important public health issue. Domestic violence may commence or escalate in pregnancy’42’ and the pattern of violence also appears to alter, with pregnant women.

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV) Includes statistics that reflect the most recent research concerning domestic violence, pregnancy, and reproductive health care. Domestic violence kills more pregnant women each year than any other cause. Nearly 20% of women experience violence during pregnancy, with pregnant adolescents and women with unintended pregnancies at an increased risk. Not only does domestic violence impact those women and any children who witness their mothers being abused, but new research finds that if a woman experiences domestic violence during pregnanc.

Nurses in dealing with pregnant women have to make certain considerations in their assessment of the situation. In nursing care, the nurse has to carry out a physical and mental assessment of the battered woman. The nurse also has a role to play in helping curb domestic violence during pregnancy. These issues are addressed in this essay. Domestic violence as it relates to pregnancy starts like domestic.

Intimate partner abuse can cause serious health problems for you and your fetus. You may get bruises, cuts, or serious infections. The abuse may cause your baby to be born before he is ready. Your newborn baby may be very small and need special care after birth.

Jan. 25, 2010— In some abusive relationships, men may use strategies to force women to become pregnant, including sabotaging their birth control, researchers say.

List of related literature:

Thus, despite new laws to protect battered women from husbands and live-in companions, there may be fewer arrests and convictions as law enforcement agencies exercise the option of referring victims (or assailants) to domestic violence programs.

“Violence Against Women” by Claire M. Renzetti, Raquel Kennedy Bergen
from Violence Against Women
by Claire M. Renzetti, Raquel Kennedy Bergen
Rowman & Littlefield, 2005

Women should also be provided with local resources such as advocacy groups, domestic violence specialists, or a local shelter.

“Public Health Nursing E-Book: Population-Centered Health Care in the Community” by Marcia Stanhope, Jeanette Lancaster
from Public Health Nursing E-Book: Population-Centered Health Care in the Community
by Marcia Stanhope, Jeanette Lancaster
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Domestic violence shelters, law enforcement agencies, and social service agencies need to work closely together to protect battered women.

“The Handbook of Community Practice” by Professor of Community Social Work Marie Weil, D S W, Marie Weil, Michael Reisch, SAGE Publications, Dorothy N. Gamble, Lorraine Guitierrez, Elizabeth A. Mulroy
from The Handbook of Community Practice
by Professor of Community Social Work Marie Weil, D S W, Marie Weil, et. al.
Sage Publications, 2005

Efforts by child welfare agencies to address domestic violence.

“Handbook of Forensic Mental Health with Victims and Offenders: Assessment, Treatment, and Research” by David W. Springer, PhD, LCSW, Albert R. Roberts, DSW, PhD, BCETS, DACFE
from Handbook of Forensic Mental Health with Victims and Offenders: Assessment, Treatment, and Research
by David W. Springer, PhD, LCSW, Albert R. Roberts, DSW, PhD, BCETS, DACFE
Springer Publishing Company, 2007

We need to break the cycle of the most important predictor of domestic violence (besides age), the violent family.

“Abused Men: The Hidden Side of Domestic Violence” by Philip W. Cook
from Abused Men: The Hidden Side of Domestic Violence
by Philip W. Cook
Praeger, 2009

Home care of the battered pregnant woman: One battered woman’s pregnancy.

“Core Curriculum for Maternal-Newborn Nursing E-Book” by AWHONN, Susan Mattson, Judy E. Smith
from Core Curriculum for Maternal-Newborn Nursing E-Book
by AWHONN, Susan Mattson, Judy E. Smith
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Domestic violence places babies at risk of injury.

“Children's needs parenting capacity: child abuse, parental mental illness, learning disability, substance misuse, and domestic violence” by Hedy Cleaver, Ira Unell, Great BritainDepartment for Education
from Children’s needs parenting capacity: child abuse, parental mental illness, learning disability, substance misuse, and domestic violence
by Hedy Cleaver, Ira Unell, Great BritainDepartment for Education
Stationery Office, 2011

Programs that target children who have been exposed to violence against their mothers would also be secondary prevention strategies, because the children represent a population at high risk for domestic violence in adulthood.

“Encyclopedia of Trauma: An Interdisciplinary Guide” by Charles R. Figley
from Encyclopedia of Trauma: An Interdisciplinary Guide
by Charles R. Figley
SAGE Publications, 2012

Half of the women who have experienced domestic violence in the last 12 months have children (Povey et al. 2009).

“Violence Against Women: Current Theory and Practice in Domestic Abuse, Sexual Violence and Exploitation” by Aisha Gill, Lorraine Radford, Christine Barter, Elizabeth Gilchrist, Marianne Hester, Nancy Lombard, Alison Phipps, Nel Whiting, Lesley McMillan, Melanie McCarry, Marsha Scott, Evan Stark, Kirstein Rummery
from Violence Against Women: Current Theory and Practice in Domestic Abuse, Sexual Violence and Exploitation
by Aisha Gill, Lorraine Radford, et. al.
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2012

Responsible mothers and invisible men: Child protection in the case of adult domestic violence.

“Family Violence Across the Lifespan: An Introduction” by Ola W. Barnett, Cindy L. Miller-Perrin, Robin D. Perrin
from Family Violence Across the Lifespan: An Introduction
by Ola W. Barnett, Cindy L. Miller-Perrin, Robin D. Perrin
SAGE Publications, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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