Less Labor Discomfort, Lower Postpartum Depression Risk

 

Postpartum Depression Treatments: Self-care

Video taken from the channel: KidCareCanada


 

Is postpartum depression linked to a mother’s physical pain?

Video taken from the channel: WPLG Local 10


 

Healthwatch: Postpartum Depression Linked To Mother’s Pain After Childbirth

Video taken from the channel: WJZ


 

Risk Factors of Postpartum Depression

Video taken from the channel: All Health TV


 

Reduced Labor Pain May Reduce Chances Of Postpartum Depression

Video taken from the channel: Wochit News


 

Painful labor linked to postpartum depression

Video taken from the channel: CBSN


 

Baby Blues vs Postpartum Depression: Signs, Risks & Treatments!

Video taken from the channel: Sarah Lavonne


“Reducing pain during labor is associated with a reduced risk for postpartum depression,” said study leader Dr. Grace Lim, director of obstetric anesthesiology at Magee-Women’s Hospital of. “Reducing pain during labor is associated with a reduced risk for postpartum depression,” said study leader Dr. Grace Lim, director of obstetric anesthesiology at Magee-Women’s Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Postpartum depression is a common condition, affecting one in eight women after having a baby.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) Women who obtain good pain relief during labor may have to worry less about postpartum depression later, new research suggests. “Reducing pain during labor is associated with a reduced risk for postpartum depression,” said study leader Dr. Grace Lim, director of obstetric anesthesiology at Magee-Women’s Hospital of University of.

The women answered questions about their pain and reported depression symptoms six weeks after childbirth. The researchers found a link between the pain relief and the depression risk. Those with more pain relief during labor had lower scores on a scale that measured depression. WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) Women who obtain good pain relief during labor may have to worry less about postpartum depression later, new research suggests. “Reducing pain during labor is associated with a reduced risk for postpartum depression,” said study leader Dr.

Grace Lim, director of obstetric anesthesiology at Magee. “Reducing pain during labor is associated with a reduced risk for postpartum depression,” said study leader Dr. Grace Lim, director of obstetric anesthesiology at Magee-Women’s Hospital of. “Although we found an association between women who experience less pain during labor and lower risk for postpartum depression, we do not know if effective pain control with epidural analgesia.

“Although we found an association between women who experience less pain during labor and lower risk for postpartum depression, we do not know if effective pain control with epidural analgesia will assure avoidance of the condition,” said Dr. Lim. “Postpartum depression can develop from a number of things including hormonal changes, psychological adjustment to motherhood, social support, and a history of psychiatric disorders.”. A few studies on this topic suggest that labor analgesia interventions may be associated with reduced postpartum depression risk. 4–6 Ding et al. found that labor epidural analgesia was associated with a reduced risk for postpartum depression compared to no epidural analgesia (odds ratio 0.31, 95% confidence interval 0.12–0.82). 5 However, while labor pain scores were lower.

A preliminary study suggests that lower levels of labor pain reduce the likelihood of postpartum depression, a condition affecting mothers who have recently given birth, according to a statement from the American Society of Anesthesiologists. The study findings were presented at the society’s annual meeting.

List of related literature:

Epidural labor analgesia is associated with a decreased risk of postpartum depression: a prospective cohort study.

“Chestnut's Obstetric Anesthesia E-Book” by David H. Chestnut, Cynthia A Wong, Lawrence C Tsen, Warwick D Ngan Kee, Yaakov Beilin, Jill Mhyre, Brian T. Bateman, Naveen Nathan
from Chestnut’s Obstetric Anesthesia E-Book
by David H. Chestnut, Cynthia A Wong, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

But Gomberg (1974) notes that whereas a women may lose a few months work postpartum for giving birth to a total of two children, because men are at a greater risk for alcoholism and coronary infarction, they may lose up to ten years of productivity.

“A Clinical Guide to the Treatment of the Human Stress Response” by George S. Everly Jr.
from A Clinical Guide to the Treatment of the Human Stress Response
by George S. Everly Jr.
Springer US, 2012

Overall, significantly more women in the magnesium group ceased therapy because of side effects (RR 3.26; 95% CI 2.46–4.31), whereas there was significantly more maternal hypotension and tachycardia but no significant differences in maternal respiratory depression, postpartum hemorrhage, or cesarean births.

“High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult” by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, Carl P. Weiner, Bernard Gonik
from High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult
by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Some outcome studies have shown that childbirth classes result in decreased pain and anxiety (Dickason, Schult, & Silverman, 1990; Goldberg, Cohen, & Lieberman, 1999), shorter labor, decreased use of forceps, improved infant outcome, and an overall positive experience (Riedmann, 1996).

“Dimensions of Human Behavior: The Changing Life Course” by Elizabeth D. Hutchison
from Dimensions of Human Behavior: The Changing Life Course
by Elizabeth D. Hutchison
SAGE Publications, 2008

A 2009 Norwegian study demonstrated that breech presentation and breech delivery are significant risk factors for cerebral palsy and a trend toward increasing risk for cerebral palsy among singletons born at term in breech by vaginal delivery (nearly fourfold).

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Mark B Landon, Joe Leigh Simpson, Deborah A Driscoll
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

An estimated 40 to 70 percent of new mothers have postpartum depression caused by radical changes in hormonal levels, which can last up to three months; 30 percent have long-lasting and severe postpartum depression (Behavioral Health Treatment 1997).

“Attachment, Trauma, and Healing: Understanding and Treating Attachment Disorder in Children, Families and Adults” by Sumiko Hennessy, Michael Orlans, Terry M. Levy
from Attachment, Trauma, and Healing: Understanding and Treating Attachment Disorder in Children, Families and Adults
by Sumiko Hennessy, Michael Orlans, Terry M. Levy
Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2014

Mothers at increased risk for depression are socioeconomically disadvantaged, have preterm infants, and are adolescents.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Deborah A Driscoll, Vincenzo Berghella, William A Grobman, Sarah J Kilpatrick, Alison G Cahill
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Mark B Landon, Henry L Galan, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

The loss of sleep, the want of nourishment, the anxiety of protracted labor, and above all the nervous depression produced by pain; all of these tend to exhaust the patient and prepare the way for uterine inertia [the slowing and stopping of labor].

“Brought to Bed: Childbearing in America, 1750-1950” by Judith Walzer Leavitt
from Brought to Bed: Childbearing in America, 1750-1950
by Judith Walzer Leavitt
Oxford University Press, 1988

However, there is also evidence of increased maternal depression symptoms and impacts on child well-being (e.g., less breastfeeding, lower reading to child rates; Herbst, 2017).

“Handbook of Parenting and Child Development Across the Lifespan” by Matthew R. Sanders, Alina Morawska
from Handbook of Parenting and Child Development Across the Lifespan
by Matthew R. Sanders, Alina Morawska
Springer International Publishing, 2018

Mothers with higher cumulative risks showed less decline in depressive symptoms in the months following the child’s birth, with the maternal sociodemographic risks contributing more to the persistence of depressive symptoms than infant medical risk (Poehlmann et al., 2009).

“Handbook of Infant Mental Health, Fourth Edition” by Charles H. Zeanah
from Handbook of Infant Mental Health, Fourth Edition
by Charles H. Zeanah
Guilford Publications, 2018

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

2 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • I had my son 10 weeks ago and I definitely went through some of this. It did go away after about 3 weeks but man….it was rough. I cried all the time and for no reason at all. I would tell my husband that I needed to take a shower and I would go stand in our bedroom and just bawl my eyes out. My husband took me out to eat, just he and I like a week after our son was born and I think I cried through like 95% of dinner. And any time I thought about getting out of the house, I would nearly have a panic attack. Like even just going for a walk was so nerve wracking. But I was very lucky mine went away after about 3-4 weeks. My husband and my parents were lifesavers though. I could call my mom and just cry on the phone and she was there for me. It’s definitely a huge change going from being pregnant to having this little human that depends on you from everything.

  • Sarah you are GIFTED. Through your videos you guided me through my pregnancy and now PP! You are incredible so appreciate this video ❤️