Lengthy Naps Raise Risk for Diabetes Type 2

 

Long daytime naps are ‘warning sign’ for type-2 diabetes

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Study: Scientists find link between long naps and diabetes

Video taken from the channel: WSLS 10


 

Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, Another Risk Factor for Diabetes

Video taken from the channel: Dr. Zulfiquar Ahmed


 

Study Finds Link Between Daytime Naps and Diabetes

Video taken from the channel: b/60


 

Today’s HealthNews For You Type 2 Diabetes and Day Time Naps

Video taken from the channel: Today’s HealthNews


 

Daytime naps associated with diabetes

Video taken from the channel: CBS 42


 

Sleep, Naps and Diabetes Risk

Video taken from the channel: dailyRx


Tomahide’s team found that naps lasting an hour or more were associated with a 45 percent increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Shorter naps had no effect on diabetes ris. WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News)—Could long afternoon naps raise your risk of developing type 2 diabetes? It’s possible but not yet proven, according to new.

They found that naps longer than an hour were associated with a 45 percent higher risk of type 2 diabetes, while shorter naps (or no napping at all) posed no additional risk. Daytime sleepiness and taking long naps during the day may both be associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, according to a meta-analysis presented at EASD. According to this review, naps lasting longer than an hour may increase the risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes. In a meta-analysis of 10 studies published through November 2014 including 261,365 Western and Asian participants, researchers found that excessive daytime sleepiness and naps longer than 60.

Findings revealed excessive daytime sleepiness increased the risk of developing type-2 diabetes by 56 percent, and long naps over 60 minutes increased the risk of diabetes by 46 percent. According to a new study, however, daytime sleepiness and taking long naps may both also be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Getting enough sleep is a key part of a.

Self-reported frequency of napping was obtained by questionnaire and type 2 diabetes was assessed by fasting blood glucose and/or self-reports of physician diagnosis or treatment. For those who took naps for longer than 60 minutes on a regular basis, their risk of developing type 2 diabetes went up 46 percent. However, if the nap was shorter than 60.

List of related literature:

Many of these studies have found that people who sleep less or who report sleep disturbances are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than people who sleep longer or better.

“Encyclopedia of Sleep” by Clete Kushida
from Encyclopedia of Sleep
by Clete Kushida
Elsevier Science, 2012

Several epidemiologic studies have shown an association between sleep duration and type 2 diabetes mellitus.66 Ayaset al.67 found an association between long sleep duration ( 9 hours) and diabetes mellitus.

“Sleep Disorders Medicine E-Book: Basic Science, Technical Considerations, and Clinical Aspects” by Sudhansu Chokroverty
from Sleep Disorders Medicine E-Book: Basic Science, Technical Considerations, and Clinical Aspects
by Sudhansu Chokroverty
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

There is also strong epidemiologic evidence for a link between self-reported sleep duration and an increased risk of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

“Sleep Deprivation and Disease: Effects on the Body, Brain and Behavior” by Matt T. Bianchi
from Sleep Deprivation and Disease: Effects on the Body, Brain and Behavior
by Matt T. Bianchi
Springer New York, 2013

Day napping and short night sleeping are associated with higher risk of diabetes in older adults.

“Integrative Medicine E-Book” by David Rakel
from Integrative Medicine E-Book
by David Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Several epidemiologic studies have shown an association between sleep duration and type 2 diabetes mellitus [79].

“Sleep Disorders Medicine: Basic Science, Technical Considerations and Clinical Aspects” by Sudhansu Chokroverty
from Sleep Disorders Medicine: Basic Science, Technical Considerations and Clinical Aspects
by Sudhansu Chokroverty
Springer New York, 2017

A few studies also indicate that glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients may be influenced by sleep duration.308,309,312

“Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric E-Book” by J. Larry Jameson, Leslie J. De Groot
from Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric E-Book
by J. Larry Jameson, Leslie J. De Groot
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Evidence is accumulating that inadequate sleep may be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

“Integrative and Functional Medical Nutrition Therapy: Principles and Practices” by Diana Noland, Jeanne A. Drisko, Leigh Wagner
from Integrative and Functional Medical Nutrition Therapy: Principles and Practices
by Diana Noland, Jeanne A. Drisko, Leigh Wagner
Springer International Publishing, 2020

For example, shortened sleep time may impair glucose metabolism and increase the risk of diabetes, independent of its effect on weight or body mass index.

“The Insomnia Workbook: A Comprehensive Guide to Getting the Sleep You Need” by Stephanie A. Silberman, Charles M. Morin
from The Insomnia Workbook: A Comprehensive Guide to Getting the Sleep You Need
by Stephanie A. Silberman, Charles M. Morin
New Harbinger Publications, Incorporated, 2009

For individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus, sleep disturbances may be related to obesity and sleep apnea, and recent studies have also demonstrated a strong association between obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and sleep apnea.

“Stress Science: Neuroendocrinology” by George Fink
from Stress Science: Neuroendocrinology
by George Fink
Elsevier Science, 2010

Observational and experimental research conducted over the past decade indicates that, in addition to decrements in daytime alertness, sleep restriction can have a negative impact on endocrine function (see Chapter 26), and the effect on glucose homeostasis may increase the risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

“Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine: Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features” by Meir H. Kryger, Thomas Roth, William C. Dement
from Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine: Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features
by Meir H. Kryger, Thomas Roth, William C. Dement
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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