Ladies Who Are Most vulnerable to Stroke

 

Stroke Risk In Women Dr. Lucas Mercy

Video taken from the channel: Mercy Medical Center Baltimore


 

Women and Stroke Risk

Video taken from the channel: Bottom Line Inc


 

Women Who Are Most at Risk of Stroke | JRWH | 29th October 2019 | ETV Life

Video taken from the channel: ETV Life India


 

3 Ways a Woman’s Stroke Risk Differs from Men’s

Video taken from the channel: AdvocateHealthCare


 

Is the risk of stroke higher in women than men?

Video taken from the channel: TMJ4 News


 

Why are Young Women at Risk for Strokes?

Video taken from the channel: Lee Health


 

Women and Stroke: Common Signs

Video taken from the channel: Health Science Channel


Rexrode’s team analyzed the scientific literature and identified several factors that increase stroke risk in women. These include: Menstruation before age. Women and stroke risk One risk factor for stroke that many people are not aware of is sex — women are more likely to experience stroke than men. They are also more likely to die as a result.

Every. Stroke risk increases with age, and women live longer than men. Women also have unique risk factors for stroke, including: Having high blood pressure during ; Using certain types of birth control medicines, especially if they also smoke.

About 1 in 8 women smoke. 5; Having higher rates of depression. 6; Why are African American women at higher risk for stroke?Women Who Are Most at Risk of Stroke Women Who Are Most at Risk of Stroke THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Stroke affects more women than men in the United States.

And a new study pinpoints stroke risk factors unique to females. It’s the leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death in women, the researchers said in background notes. Rexrode’s team analyzed the scientific literature and identified several factors that increase stroke risk in women.

These include: Menstruation before age 10. Menopause before age 45. Rexrode’s team analyzed the scientific literature and identified several factors that increase stroke risk in women. These include: Menstruation before age 10, Menopause before age 45, Low levels of the hormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS), Use of birth control pills.

A history of pregnancy complications can also indicate higher stroke risk. Women Have a Higher Risk of Stroke. Stroke is no friend to women.

It kills more women than men and women have more strokes than men. In fact, one in five women has a stroke. The higher stroke risk in women might be due to: Pregnancy –The risk of stroke in pregnant women is 21 per 100,000, with the highest stroke risk during the third trimester and post-partum. Some risk factors are specific to women. High levels of the female hormone oestrogen can make your blood more likely to clot, so women with risk factors for stroke may not be able to use contraceptive pills containing oestrogen.

Overall, the risks are. High Blood Pressure is the No. 1 Controllable Risk Factor for Stroke. Nearly half of American adults have high blood pressure, or hypertension.

Work with your doctor to keep your blood pressure in a healthy range (under 120/80). Download the High Blood Pressure Increases Stroke Risk. Stroke Risk Varies by Age.

Stroke risk increases with age, but strokes can—and do—occur at any age. In 2009, 34% of people hospitalized for stroke were less than 65 years old. 3; Early Action Is Important for Stroke.

Know the warning signs and symptoms of stroke so that you can act fast if you or someone you know might be having a stroke.

List of related literature:

Risk factors for stroke include poorly controlled hypertension, diabetes mellitus, high cholesterol levels, smoking, cocaine use, alcohol abuse, obesity, high-dose estrogen drug therapy, and cerebral aneurysm.

“Nursing Care Plans E-Book: Nursing Diagnosis and Intervention” by Meg Gulanick, Judith L. Myers
from Nursing Care Plans E-Book: Nursing Diagnosis and Intervention
by Meg Gulanick, Judith L. Myers
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Although the female risk of stroke is low, strokes are more common amongst middle-aged women who suffer from depression and in pregnant women who are prone to migraine headaches.

“Textbook of Podiatric Medicine” by Catherine Hayes, Judith Barbaro Brown
from Textbook of Podiatric Medicine
by Catherine Hayes, Judith Barbaro Brown
M&K Publishing, 2017

Therefore, early treatment of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia (abnormal fats in the blood)—the major risk factors for stroke—can have great impact on prevention of stroke at older age in women.

“Encyclopedia of Women's Health” by Sana Loue, Martha Sajatovic
from Encyclopedia of Women’s Health
by Sana Loue, Martha Sajatovic
Springer US, 2004

There are several factors which increase the risk of stroke including high blood pressure, smoking, heart disease, age, the contraceptive pill and HRT.

“The Essential Guide to Holistic and Complementary Therapy” by Helen Beckmann, Suzanne E. Le Quesne
from The Essential Guide to Holistic and Complementary Therapy
by Helen Beckmann, Suzanne E. Le Quesne
Cengage Learning, 2005

Nonmodifiable risk factors for stroke include age, sex (men > women), race/ethnicity (African Americans > Caucasians), and a family history of stroke.

“Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 2-Volume Set” by Peter Libby, Robert O. Bonow, Douglas L. Mann, Douglas P. Zipes
from Braunwald’s Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 2-Volume Set
by Peter Libby, Robert O. Bonow, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

Important risk factors for stroke include elevated blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, disorders of heart rhythm, low HDL-C, cigarette smoking, family history, and chronic kidney disease (Goet al. 2013).

“Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health” by Roger Detels, Martin Gulliford, Quarraisha Abdool Karim, Chorh Chuan Tan
from Oxford Textbook of Global Public Health
by Roger Detels, Martin Gulliford, et. al.
Oxford University Press, 2017

Incidence and risk factors for stroke in pregnancy and the puerperium.

“Sex Differences in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathophysiology” by Babbette LaMarca, Ph.D., Barbara T. Alexander, PhD, FAHA, FAPS
from Sex Differences in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathophysiology
by Babbette LaMarca, Ph.D., Barbara T. Alexander, PhD, FAHA, FAPS
Elsevier Science, 2019

The risk of stroke doubles each decade after 55 years, mirroring the increase in risk factors such as hypertension and AF.12 Hypertension is the primary risk factor for stroke, but age, family history, smoking, diabetes, high cholesterol, and heart disease also contribute to its incidence.

“Nancy Caroline’s Emergency Care in the Streets” by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), Nancy L. Caroline
from Nancy Caroline’s Emergency Care in the Streets
by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), Nancy L. Caroline
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2017

Metabolic syndrome (abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia) doubles the stroke risk in women but does not affect the stroke risk in men.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Risk factors for stroke development include hypertension, diabetes mellitus, tobacco use, elevated cholesterol, peripheral arterial disease, and atrial fibrillation.

“Clinical Manifestations & Assessment of Respiratory Disease E-Book” by Terry Des Jardins, George G. Burton
from Clinical Manifestations & Assessment of Respiratory Disease E-Book
by Terry Des Jardins, George G. Burton
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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