Know Your Choices for Managing Discomfort after Surgery

 

Postoperative Pain Management

Video taken from the channel: Women’s Care Florida


 

Controlling Pain After Thoracic Surgery

Video taken from the channel: Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center


 

Pain Expectations After Surgery

Video taken from the channel: BAYSTATEHEALTH


 

Your Anaesthestic and Pain Relief after Surgery

Video taken from the channel: East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust


 

Your surgery journey – managing pain and nausea

Video taken from the channel: AHSChannel


 

Fear of Pain: Managing Pain After Cosmetic Surgery

Video taken from the channel: Austin-Weston, The Center for Cosmetic Surgery


 

New Approach to Pain Management after Surgery

Video taken from the channel: Lee Health


Managing anxiety and depression after surgery, whether with medication or social support often reduces the need for pain medication, Fraifeld says, and is. Before leaving the hospital, you may also receive a prescription for additional narcotics to help manage your recovery. Narcotics are powerful pain relievers and can be important to manage some types of postsurgical pain. However, narcotics are commonly associated with nausea, vomiting and sedation.

Pain is common after some surgeries. But successfully managing it after surgery does more than just keep you comfortable it can also speed up your recovery time. Staying ahead of pain helps you. Pain control not only makes you more comfortable, it can help you recover faster and may reduce your risk of developing certain complications after surgery, such as pneumonia and blood clots.

If your pain is well controlled, you will be better able to complete important tasks such as walking and deep breathing exercises. Your surgeon will tell you if this is recommended after the kind of surgery you had. Heat helps decrease pain and muscle spasms.

Apply heat for 20 to 30 minutes every 2 hours for as directed. Ice helps prevent tissue damage and decreases swelling and pain. The key to effective pain management is to use a combination of methods. “If you are having surgery on a lower extremity, elevate it after the procedure. This can help substantially with pain relief, swelling, and wound healing,” says Dr. Chiodo.

Icing the area can also help in the first 24 to 48 hours after surgery. In some cases, a nerve block can be used as the main anesthetic for your surgery. In this case, you will be given medications during your surgery to keep you sleepy, relaxed, and comfortable.

This type of anesthesia provides the added benefit of. Pain management. These four videos review pain expectations, rating your pain, pain treatment options and home pain management. Watch all four modules. Regional anesthesia for post-operative pain control.

This 24-minute video explains what a peripheral nerve block is and how you can use it to control pain in the hospital and after you return. If you take drugs to treat chronic pain, your body may be less sensitive to pain medication. Your doctor will discuss options for treating both chronic pain and post-surgical pain. List of your medications. Include all prescription and over-the-counter medications plus any supplements or herbs you’ve taken in the past month.

Managing Pain With Medications After Orthopaedic Surgery. After orthopaedic surgery, your doctors and nurses will make every effort to control your pain. While you should expect to feel some discomfort, there are several options available to your doctor to manage and relieve pain.

Many types of medicines are available to help control pain, including opioids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and local anesthetics.

List of related literature:

For this reason, it is recommended to utilize available pain specialists and set up a multimodal pain management plan using narcotics, gabapentin, NSAIDs, ketamine, benzodiazepines, and epidural or paravertebral catheters as necessary.

“Current Surgical Therapy E-Book” by John L. Cameron, Andrew M. Cameron
from Current Surgical Therapy E-Book
by John L. Cameron, Andrew M. Cameron
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Rawal N: Postoperative pain treatment for ambulatory surgery, Best Practice & Research.

“Wall & Melzack's Textbook of Pain E-Book” by Stephen B. McMahon, Martin Koltzenburg, Irene Tracey, Dennis Turk
from Wall & Melzack’s Textbook of Pain E-Book
by Stephen B. McMahon, Martin Koltzenburg, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Kalman SH, Jensen AG, Nystrom PO, et al: Intravenous versus intraperitoneal morphine before surgery to provide postoperative pain relief.

“Essentials of Pain Medicine E-book” by Honorio Benzon, Srinivasa N. Raja, Scott E. Fishman, Spencer S Liu, Steven P Cohen
from Essentials of Pain Medicine E-book
by Honorio Benzon, Srinivasa N. Raja, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Epidural pain relief versus systemic opioid-based pain relief for abdominal aortic surgery.

“Pain Assessment and Pharmacologic Management E-Book” by Chris Pasero, Margo McCaffery
from Pain Assessment and Pharmacologic Management E-Book
by Chris Pasero, Margo McCaffery
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

For this reason, options for prolonged postoperative pain control may include intraoperative injection of local anesthetic, morphine, clonidine, or ketorolac by the surgeon.

“Yao and Artusio's Anesthesiology” by Fun-Sun F. Yao, Vinod Malhotra, Manuel L. Fontes
from Yao and Artusio’s Anesthesiology
by Fun-Sun F. Yao, Vinod Malhotra, Manuel L. Fontes
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011

Other treatments that may be effective for pain from SCD include massage therapy, physical therapy, distraction, music therapy, art therapy, and CBT.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Rawal N. Postoperative pain treatment for ambulatory surgery.

“Miller's Anesthesia, 2-Volume Set E-Book” by Michael A. Gropper, Ronald D. Miller, Lars I. Eriksson, Lee A Fleisher, Jeanine P. Wiener-Kronish, Neal H Cohen, Kate Leslie
from Miller’s Anesthesia, 2-Volume Set E-Book
by Michael A. Gropper, Ronald D. Miller, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Persistent pain after cardiac surgery: an audit of high thoracic epidural and primary opioid analgesia therapies.

“Kaplan's Cardiac Anesthesia E-Book: In Cardiac and Noncardiac Surgery” by Joel A. Kaplan
from Kaplan’s Cardiac Anesthesia E-Book: In Cardiac and Noncardiac Surgery
by Joel A. Kaplan
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Bong CL, Samuel M, Ng JM, Ip-Yam C. Effects of preemptive epidural analgesia on post-thoracotomy pain.

“A Practice of Anesthesia for Infants and Children E-Book: Expert Consult: Online and Print” by Charles J. Cote, Jerrold Lerman, I. David Todres
from A Practice of Anesthesia for Infants and Children E-Book: Expert Consult: Online and Print
by Charles J. Cote, Jerrold Lerman, I. David Todres
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Kumar K,Nath R,Wyant GM.Treatment ofchronic pain by epidural spinal cord stimulation: a 10-year experience.

“Spinal Cord Medicine, Second Edition: Principles and Practice” by Christopher M. Bono, MD, Diana D. Cardenas, MD, MHA, Frederick S. Frost, MD, Margaret C. Hammond, MD, Vernon W. Lin, MD, PhD, Laurie B. Lindblom, MD, Inder Parkash, MD, MS, FRCS, FACS, Stevens A. Stiens, MD, MS, Robert M. Woolsey, MD
from Spinal Cord Medicine, Second Edition: Principles and Practice
by Christopher M. Bono, MD, Diana D. Cardenas, MD, MHA, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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2 comments

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  • Talk to patients, not doctors going to seminars and trying to protect themselves from the opiod crisis. I just had throat cancer surgery and had no idea I would not receive the proper pain meds. Tylenol and ibuprofen was all they would prescribe. I was in misery and when I called to get real pain meds, the doc wouldn’t talk to me. He had his receptionist deny my request. I plan on filing a written complaint but, unfortunately, I have to go back to the same doc for another surgery. I asked to meet with him prior to the procedure to approach my concerns. Unbelievable! I am not a drug seeker, even though they make you feel that way. I am a college professor. Opiod pain treatment works and has always been the only medication for extensive surgeries. Very concerned about my next procedure.

  • You know this is a bit bs i had a kidney transplant it sucked they gave a baby dose of hydrocodone the nurse is the one that pointed it out to us she said no wounder why your hurting and blood pressure is high she cant say anything to the doctor she would of been fired the doctor i got was a bitch she wotked in a children’s hospital i was 14 when i got my transplant i met a little girl same doctor but she had cancer that doctor would even give her pain meds what kind of person dose that that doctor asked witch nurse told i laughed and told her im not telling you. You will have her fired