Kitchen Cooking Burns Really are a Real Danger for children

 

How to Keep Kids SAFE in the Kitchen

Video taken from the channel: WhatsUpMoms


 

Burn Injuries in Children

Video taken from the channel: NationwideChildrens


 

What Not to Heat: Keeping Kids Safe in the Kitchen

Video taken from the channel: MUSC Health


 

Kitchen Safety: Protecting kids from scalding injuries

Video taken from the channel: LifespanHealthSystem


 

Child plays with fire, burns down family’s home

Video taken from the channel: WPRI


 

Preventing Burns and Scalds in Children

Video taken from the channel: KidsafeWA


 

Safety In The Domestic Kitchen: Preventing Burns And Scalds

Video taken from the channel: ClickView


Cooking burns are common among American children, but can be prevented with simple precautions, doctors say. “The majority of our burn patients. Unfortunately, this burn accident was not an isolated case. Cooking burns are common among American children, but can be prevented with simple precautions, doctors say. “The majority of our burn patients are children who are seriously injured in cookingor food-related injuries,” Baldea said. Kitchen Cooking Burns Are a Real Danger for Kids The majority of serious burn injuries among children occur during cookingor food-related accidents in the kitchen.

Unfortunately, this burn accident was not an isolated case. Cooking burns are common among American children, but can be prevented with simple precautions, doctors say. Kitchen Cooking Burns a Real Danger for Kids.

FRIDAY, Aug. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) The day she ended up with secondand third-degree burns on her back, 4-year-old Giuliana Maggio was just busy doing what 4-year-olds do: running around the house, playing hide-and-seek during a. Scalds were the most common injury for children in the Burn Center in 2018. One place where scalds and burns happen is the kitchen. As children grow, they like to try out their independence.

And that may mean trying to “help” mom or dad in the kitchen. So yes, cooking does pose a small risk to your kids, no matter how careful everyone is – it’s just an inherent part of being around ovens and knives. But never learning to cook is. Burn safety is a foreign concept to most young explorers. In fact, one of the most difficult lessons young children learn is that some things — such as.

Cooking fires are the number one cause of home fires and home injuries. The leading cause of fires in the kitchen is unattended cooking. How to Prevent Burns in the Kitchen Create a kid-free zone. Teach younger children to stay at least 3 feet away from your cooking space.

If you need to watch babies while cooking, place them in a highchair outside of the kid-free zone where you can see them.

List of related literature:

Although burns may be accidental in young children, certain types of burns are highly suspicious.

“Broadribb's Introductory Pediatric Nursing” by Nancy T. Hatfield
from Broadribb’s Introductory Pediatric Nursing
by Nancy T. Hatfield
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007

You should suspect possible internal injuries from chemical ingestion when you see a child who has burns, particularly around the face and mouth.

“Advanced Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured” by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
from Advanced Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured
by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2010

Most burns in children are relatively minor and do not require hospitalization.

“All-in-One Nursing Care Planning Resource: Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, and Psychiatric-Mental Health” by Pamela L. Swearingen
from All-in-One Nursing Care Planning Resource: Medical-Surgical, Pediatric, Maternity, and Psychiatric-Mental Health
by Pamela L. Swearingen
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Burns are a leading cause of accidental death in children.

“Pediatric Nursing: An Introductory Text” by Debra L. Price, Julie F. Gwin
from Pediatric Nursing: An Introductory Text
by Debra L. Price, Julie F. Gwin
Elsevier Saunders, 2008

injuries in children include scald and contact burns from cooking, space heaters, camp fires, and fireworks.

“Medical Speech-Language Pathology: A Desk Reference, Fourth Edition” by Lee Ann C. Golper, Bernice K. Klaben, Claire Kane Miller
from Medical Speech-Language Pathology: A Desk Reference, Fourth Edition
by Lee Ann C. Golper, Bernice K. Klaben, Claire Kane Miller
Plural Publishing, Incorporated, 2018

Children under 5 years of age account for nearly 45% of all severe burns and scalds and half of the accidents happen in the kitchen.

“A Textbook of Children's and Young People's Nursing E-Book” by Edward Alan Glasper, Dr Jim Richardson, James Richardson
from A Textbook of Children’s and Young People’s Nursing E-Book
by Edward Alan Glasper, Dr Jim Richardson, James Richardson
Elsevier Health Sciences UK, 2010

Electrical and chemical burns are uncommon in children and can be lethal if they are severe.128 Inflicted injury is an additional cause of thermal injury in infants and children.

“Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child E-Book” by Mary Fran Hazinski
from Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child E-Book
by Mary Fran Hazinski
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Children who accidentally burn themselves by grabbing hot objects usually have burns on the palms of the hands or irregular splash-shaped burns from pulling a pan off the stove.

“Berry & Kohn's Operating Room Technique E-Book” by Nancymarie Phillips
from Berry & Kohn’s Operating Room Technique E-Book
by Nancymarie Phillips
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Chemical burns are uncommon in children, although they can occur.

“Nurse Anesthesia E-Book” by John J. Nagelhout, Karen Plaus
from Nurse Anesthesia E-Book
by John J. Nagelhout, Karen Plaus
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Common sites of injury with accidental splash burns include the head, face, chest, and abdomen, sites that would be affected if the child pulled hot liquid off a stove or table.

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by A.K. David, S.A. Fields, D.M. Phillips, J.E. Scherger, Robert Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by A.K. David, S.A. Fields, et. al.
Springer New York, 2002

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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7 comments

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  • When I was small my parents would teach me and trust me! sometimes it was good but I was burned a lot! I think this is a good video to watch

  • That’s an awesome video!
    Here, at AV2 Media, we produce educational titles for schools and libraries. We are seeking permission to upload this video to our site. I believe it would greatly benefit student learning and your permission would be appreciated. We would like to use it as part of online supplemental resources for our title ‘Cuts and Burns’, part of our ‘In Case of Emergency’ series. Please reply to [email protected] av2books.com, and also include this code in the email ( DWMGU ).
    Thanks,
    AV2 Media Team

  • I know this was posted a year ago but I know how to cook pan cakes and cupcakes with someone’s help and I am only in grade school 1-4

  • Hi what’s up moms! I might be a kid but your hacks always help me with my brothers (where triplets) there not to best with safety and we are mostly outside in the woods so my parents are not their to help. Also it’s hard to keep the entertained so these hacks are helpful.

    P.S. you guys to such a great job

  • I learned to cook alone. Starting from 3rd grade, I would be left completely alone in the house for a few hours. I got hungry so I just began to cook. Flash forward MANY years, and I love to cook, and I am very safe. I feel like there needs to be a different approach for every kid.

  • This video is so helpful! I have 2 kids and 1 baby. Both kids (6 and 4) love to help me out, since I have a baby on my hip most of the time I can’t always watch them. I’d love for them to help me cook but, I’m always a little anxious when someone comes into the kitchen wanting to help me make dinner. My husband is at work while I cook dinner so he can’t take the baby. There’s not a lot that can be done about this situation but safety is something that had to be done! This video is so helpful! These are some really great tips! I’m definitely making some rules! Our kids safety is more important than anything!

  • The video: talks about how to keep kids safe in the kitchen

    Me: has a flashback to something wich was not metioned in the video

    me again: did not even know that vegetable peelers are actually not safe for little children until i was 9

    Why?You might ask.Well then read this��

    I used vegetable peelers since i was 3 and did not know AT ALL that it was dangerous for me (luckily i did not get hurt using it)

    Edit: btw, i was not trying to brag just wanted to share this random flashback of mine.