Just When Was an Opioid Safe to consider

 

Mayo Clinic Minute: When are opioids OK to take?

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Responsible Use of Opioids

Video taken from the channel: Psych Hub Education


 

Opioid Use and Drug Safety during COVID-19

Video taken from the channel: National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA/NIH)


 

Opioid tapering protocol

Video taken from the channel: Portico Network


 

Is it ever safe to take Opioids?

Video taken from the channel: All Health TV


 

Managing Surgical Pain: Non-opioid Options and Safe Opioid Use

Video taken from the channel: WellSpan Health


 

How to Take Opioids Safely After Surgery

Video taken from the channel: Fox Chase Cancer Center


But an opioid painkiller, such as oxycodone (Oxycontin, Percocet) or hydrocodone (Vicoprofen) can sometimes be the best option for treating pain in the short term, particularly right after surgery. When are opioids safe to take? Opioids are commonly used to control acute, intense pain.

Meditation, yoga, and acupuncture may help control pain when tapering off opioids. Published: March, 2015. Although these powerful pain relievers can be addictive, opioids are. How to use opioids safely. The best time to plan for safe use and disposal of opioids is before you start these medications.

By Mayo Clinic Staff. If you are taking opioids or talking with your doctor about this treatment option, now is the time to plan for safe use and disposal of these medications. Practicing caution can mean the difference between life and death for you, your loved ones and even your. Prescription opioids used for pain relief are generally safe when taken for a short time and as prescribed by your health care provider. However, people who take opioids are at risk for opioid dependence, addiction, and overdose.

These risks increase when opioids are misused. But an opioid painkiller, such as oxycodone (Oxycontin, Percocet) or hydrocodone (Vicoprofen) can sometimes be the best option for treating pain in the short term, particularly right after surgery or during a severe pain flare-up, pain experts say. The following resources promote the responsible and effective use of these medications in the treatment of pain. Proper Use of Opioids. Improving Opioid Prescribing Opioid prescribers can play a key role in stopping the opioid overdose epidemic.

Assessing risk and addressing harms of opioid use can save lives. Opioid medications also play an important role in treating cancer-related pain and, rarely, chronic, noncancer pain when other treatments haven’t worked. If you’ve taken opioids for less than two weeks, you should be able to simply stop these medications as.

If you’ve just had surgery or a severe injury, or if you have chronic pain, your doctor may prescribe you opioids to lessen your discomfort. Pain. According to the National Institutes of Health, studies have shown that properly managed medical use of opioid analgesic compounds (taken exactly as prescribed) is safe, can manage pain. Short-acting opioids work fast and relieve pain for about 3 to 6 hours.

They are often used for acute or breakthrough pain. Long-acting opioids usually last at least 8 hours. You can take them less often and they may be used for chronic pain.

List of related literature:

With regard to the risks associated with the use of prescription opioids, it has been shown that once patients have been taking opioids longer than 90 days, the risk that they will continue to take them chronically and develop a substance use disorder increases (Krashin et al., 2016).

“Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use” by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Committee on Pain Management and Regulatory Strategies to Address Prescription Opioid Abuse, Jonathan K. Phillips, Morgan A. Ford, Richard J. Bonnie
from Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use
by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2017

Patients who have been addicted to short-acting opioids, such as heroin and meperidine, must wait at least 7 days after last opioid dose before starting drug.

“Nursing2020 Drug Handbook” by Lippincott
from Nursing2020 Drug Handbook
by Lippincott
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2019

This can be problematic, as approximately one in four patients prescribed opioids for the first time will continue receiving prescriptions in the long term (at least 90 days) (Hooten et al., 2015), which may increase the risk of opioid dependence and misuse.

“Neuromodulation: Comprehensive Textbook of Principles, Technologies, and Therapies” by Elliot Krames, P. Hunter Peckham, Ali R. Rezai
from Neuromodulation: Comprehensive Textbook of Principles, Technologies, and Therapies
by Elliot Krames, P. Hunter Peckham, Ali R. Rezai
Elsevier Science, 2018

Clients are at the highest risk for opioid-induced respiratory depression during the first 24 hours of therapy, when the dose is increased, or the opioid has been changed to a different opioid (Lucas, Vlahos, & Ledgerwood, 2007; Benyamin et al, 2008; Pasero, 2009b; ASA, 2009).

“Nursing Diagnosis Handbook E-Book: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care” by Betty J. Ackley, Gail B. Ladwig
from Nursing Diagnosis Handbook E-Book: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care
by Betty J. Ackley, Gail B. Ladwig
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

However, opioid-tolerant clients are at similar risk for this side effect when they are admitted to the hospital for surgery or experience any other acute pain condition and are given opioid doses in addition to their usual dose (Pasero et al, 2011b).

“Nursing Diagnosis Handbook: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care” by Betty J. Ackley, MSN, EdS, RN, Gail B. Ladwig, MSN, RN
from Nursing Diagnosis Handbook: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care
by Betty J. Ackley, MSN, EdS, RN, Gail B. Ladwig, MSN, RN
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

Patients may experience different side effects with different opioids, and rotating to another opioid may be reasonable if the patient is not tolerating the first opioid.269 Adjuvant agents such as NSAIDs should be administered on a regularly scheduled basis to

“Bonica's Management of Pain” by Jane C. Ballantyne, Scott M. Fishman, James P. Rathmell
from Bonica’s Management of Pain
by Jane C. Ballantyne, Scott M. Fishman, James P. Rathmell
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2018

Patients may experience different side effects with different opioids, and rotating to another opioid may be reasonable if the patient is not tolerating the first opioid.168 Adjuvant drugs such as NSAIDs should be administered on a regularly scheduled basis to optimize analgesic efficacy and possibly provide an

“Miller's Anesthesia, 2-Volume Set E-Book” by Michael A. Gropper, Ronald D. Miller, Lars I. Eriksson, Lee A Fleisher, Jeanine P. Wiener-Kronish, Neal H Cohen, Kate Leslie
from Miller’s Anesthesia, 2-Volume Set E-Book
by Michael A. Gropper, Ronald D. Miller, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Due to the individualized nature of metabolism of different formulations of opioid pain medications, as a general rule it is safe to start with 75% of the total dose of the previous opioid when transitioning between opioids and titrate the dose up as necessary.

“Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology” by John P. Greer, Daniel A. Arber, Bertil E. Glader, Alan F. List, Robert M. Means, George M. Rodgers
from Wintrobe’s Clinical Hematology
by John P. Greer, Daniel A. Arber, et. al.
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2018

When opioids are administered only in the postoperative period less than 1% of patients will develop problems of addiction (D’arcy 2007).

“Alexander's Nursing Practice E-Book: Hospital and Home The Adult” by Chris Brooker, Maggie Nicol, Margaret F. Alexander
from Alexander’s Nursing Practice E-Book: Hospital and Home The Adult
by Chris Brooker, Maggie Nicol, Margaret F. Alexander
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Because it is an opioid antagonist, patients who have received opioids must wait at least 1 week before it is initiated and it should not be used in patients who may require pain management with opioids.

“Primary Care E-Book: A Collaborative Practice” by Terry Mahan Buttaro, Patricia Polgar-Bailey, Joanne Sandberg-Cook, JoAnn Trybulski
from Primary Care E-Book: A Collaborative Practice
by Terry Mahan Buttaro, Patricia Polgar-Bailey, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Lovely Video clip! Excuse me for the intrusion, I would love your opinion. Have you heard the talk about Saankramer Life Card System (probably on Google)? It is an awesome one off guide for learning how to stop drinking without the hard work. Ive heard some awesome things about it and my good mate called Gray after a lifetime of fighting got astronomical results with it.

  • I just want to take a moment to thank you, for pointing out this pandemic,l. Thank YOU, MS. AMERICA!!!! I love that you’re speaking up on this. I’m sure you are saving so many people!
    This affects more people than you may think.
    This is an opioid PANDEMIC, it happened WAY before Covid-19, affects so many family members, and there needs to be more attention to the addiction that comes from it.

  • ive been chemically dependent for 20 years and in recovery for four years..ive attended group four times a week allso have three councillors i see on a one to one basis. from watching dr.Nora Volkow on addiction:a disease of free will gave me a beter understanding of my condition in 20 mins than countles hours spent with profesionals in my area… thanks Nora. its chainged my life..im a big fan! x