Is really a Short Gap Between Pregnancies Associated with a Greater Autism Risk

 

Close birth spacing may put a second-born child at higher risk for autism, suggests a preliminary st

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Conde-Agudelo and his team reviewed seven large studies reporting a link between short birth spacing and autism. The investigators found that children born to women with less than 12 months between. However, the study doesn’t prove that either long or short intervals between pregnancies actually cause autism, just that there seems to be an association.

The study was published online April. The mechanism by which closely spaced pregnancies may boost autism risk remains unclear, but the authors offered two possible explanations: Autistic behaviors might be more noticeable when there’s an older sibling close in age for comparison; or a biological factor, such as maternal depletion of nutrients like folate, important for brain development could. 08 Apr 2016 Pregnancy & Postpartum. Medically Reviewed. THURSDAY, April 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) Spacing pregnancies in close succession may increase the risk of autism in children, a large new research review suggests.

Examining existing research involving more than 1.1 million children, scientists also found that longer pregnancy spacing in excess of five years may be linked. THURSDAY, April 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) Spacing pregnancies in close succession may increase the risk of autism in children, a large new research review suggests. Examining existing research involving more than 1.1 million children, scientists also found that longer pregnancy spacing in excess of five years may be linked to raised odds of the.

Conde-Agudelo and his team reviewed seven large studies reporting a link between short birth spacing and autism. The investigators found that children born to women with less than 12 months between pregnancies were nearly twice as likely to develop autism as children born to women with three years or longer between pregnancies. Mums who fall pregnant shortly after giving birth are 50% more likely to have an autistic child, a new study published in the journal Autism Research has revealed.

The study, conducted by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, showed a clear correlation between short birth spacing and autism. Lead author Dr. Laura Schieve used data from the Study to Explore Early Development, a multi-site case-control study with rigorous case-finding and case-classification methods. Though the study doesn’t directly prove that short and long interpregnancy intervals cause autism, the correlation doesn’t seem to be arbitrary either, according to study leader Dr.

Keely Cheslack. The investigators found that children born to women with less than 12 months between pregnancies were nearly twice as likely to develop autism as children born to women with three years or longer between pregnancies.

List of related literature:

This information may be particularly important to women who have had previous children with autism, since the probability of having a child with autism who has an autistic sibling is much higher.

“The Neuroscience of Autism Spectrum Disorders” by Joseph D. Buxbaum, Patrick R. Hof
from The Neuroscience of Autism Spectrum Disorders
by Joseph D. Buxbaum, Patrick R. Hof
Elsevier Science, 2012

Overall, however, the risk of having another child with autism is only about 5%.

“Emery's Elements of Medical Genetics E-Book” by Peter D Turnpenny, Sian Ellard
from Emery’s Elements of Medical Genetics E-Book
by Peter D Turnpenny, Sian Ellard
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

The increased incidence of ASD in DZ twins relative to siblings suggests that maternal factors may influence the risk for developing autism.

“Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences” by Robert B. Daroff, Michael J. Aminoff
from Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences
by Robert B. Daroff, Michael J. Aminoff
Elsevier Science, 2014

Low birth weight (defined as less than 2,500 g) was not associated with an increased risk of autism.

“Child Neuropsychology: Assessment and Interventions for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 2nd Edition” by Margaret Semrud-Clikeman, Phyllis Anne Teeter Ellison
from Child Neuropsychology: Assessment and Interventions for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, 2nd Edition
by Margaret Semrud-Clikeman, Phyllis Anne Teeter Ellison
Springer US, 2009

There is now a vast amount of data on factors during pregnancy and infancy that can compromise brain health and raise the risk of autism, ADHD, or developmental delays.

“Brain Health From Birth: Nurturing Brain Development During Pregnancy and the First Year” by Rebecca Fett
from Brain Health From Birth: Nurturing Brain Development During Pregnancy and the First Year
by Rebecca Fett
Franklin Fox Publishing LLC, 2019

With multifactorial disorders in general, and with neural tube defects in particular, a couple who has had one affected child has an increased risk of about 3% for having another similarly affected child.

“Hacker & Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology E-Book” by Neville F. Hacker, Joseph C. Gambone, Calvin J. Hobel
from Hacker & Moore’s Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology E-Book
by Neville F. Hacker, Joseph C. Gambone, Calvin J. Hobel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

The risk for parents who have had one child with autism for having a second is 2% to 10%.

“Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics E-Book” by William B. Carey, Allen C. Crocker, Ellen Roy Elias, Heidi M. Feldman, William L. Coleman
from Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics E-Book
by William B. Carey, Allen C. Crocker, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Specifically, parents who have one child with autism have a percent to 5 percent risk of having another child with autism, which is significantly greater than in the general population (Cook, 001).

“21st Century Psychology: A Reference Handbook” by Stephen F. Davis, William Buskist, Erin Brooke Rasmussen, Steven Randall Lawyer
from 21st Century Psychology: A Reference Handbook
by Stephen F. Davis, William Buskist, et. al.
SAGE Publications, 2008

The risk of a newborn being autistic is higher in families that already have an autistic child, and the intensity of autistic symptoms is more pronounced in families with more than one autistic child.

“The Environmental and Genetic Causes of Autism” by James Lyons-Weiler
from The Environmental and Genetic Causes of Autism
by James Lyons-Weiler
Skyhorse, 2016

The risk of another affected child being born to a couple who have had one trisomic Down’s syndrome child is increased over the normal risk, but the increase does not show a simple relation to maternal age.

“Practical Genetic Counselling” by Peter Harper
from Practical Genetic Counselling
by Peter Harper
CRC Press, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Since scientist don’t really have a well defined outline as to what autism is, but is more like a spectrum of behavioral disorders how can we trust this studies? Plus, correlation does not equal causation.