Individuals With ‘Obesity Genes’ May Gain Most Out Of Eating Healthily

 

Is obesity genetic?

Video taken from the channel: Griffith University


 

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Are Poor Genetics Making You Fat? Negative Genetic Nutrition and Diet Factors Which Lead To Obesity

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Feast, famine, and the genetics of obesity: you can’t have it both ways

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Do you overeat? Your genes may be to blame

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Gene that lets you eat as much as you want holds promise against obesity

Video taken from the channel: Flinders University


WEDNESDAY, Jan. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) Though healthy eating is good for everyone, those who have genes that put them at high risk for obesity might benefit the most. A new study suggests that even those who carry an inherited predisposition to pack on excess pounds are not destined to become obese. Those With ‘Obesity Genes’ May Gain Most From Healthy Eating.

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 10, 2018 Though healthy eating is good for everyone, those who have genes that put them at high risk for obesity might benefit the most. A new study suggests that even those who carry an inherited predisposition to pack on excess pounds are not destined to become obese. WEDNESDAY, Jan. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) Though healthy eating is good for everyone, those who have genes that put them at high risk for obesity might benefit the most.

A new study suggests that even those who carry an inherited predisposition to pack on excess pounds are not destined to become obese. Those With ‘Obesity Genes’ May Gain Most From Healthy Eating. Feb 02, 2018.

Though healthy eating is good for everyone, those who have genes that put them at high risk for obesity might benefit the most. A new study suggests that even those who carry an inherited predisposition to pack on excess pounds are not destined to become obese. Those With ‘Obesity Genes’ May Gain Most From Healthy Eating WEDNESDAY, Jan.

10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Though healthy eating is good for everyone, those who have genes that put them at high risk for obesity might benefit the most. WEDNESDAY, Jan. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Though healthy eating is good for everyone, those who have genes that put them at high risk for obesity might benefit the most. A new study suggests that even those who carry an inherited predisposition to pack on excess pounds are not destined to become obese. Though healthy eating is good for everyone, those who have genes that put them at high risk for obesity might benefit the most.

A new study suggests that even those who carry an inherited predisposition to pack on excess pounds are not destined to become obese. In fact, researchers say it can be avoided over time by adopting a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables and unencumbered by. Though healthy eating is good for everyone, those who have genes that put them at high risk for obesity might benefit the most.

A new study suggests that even those who carry an inherited predisposition to pack on excess pounds are not destined to become obese. NYT Syndicate Though healthy eating is good for everyone, those who have genes that put them at high risk for obesity might benefit the most. A new study suggests that even those who carry an inherited predisposition to pack on excess pounds are not destined to become obese. WEDNESDAY, Jan.

10, 2018 (HealthDay News) Though healthy eating is good for everyone, those who have genes that put them at high risk for obesity might benefit the most. A.

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Indeed, genomic researchers have identified hundreds of genes likely to play roles in obesity development but have not so far identified genetic causes of common obesity.62 Inherited genes clearly do influence a person’s tendency to gain weight or stay lean.

“Nutrition: Concepts and Controversies, MyPlate Update” by Frances Sizer, Ellie Whitney
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So, for example, if you look at obesity, 33 percent of this disease is attributed to environmental influences; and 67 percent is attributed to inherited markers on particular genes that can increase risk but don’t necessarily cause obesity per se.

“The End of Illness” by David B. Agus
from The End of Illness
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In common obesity, mutation in a single gene contributes only a small degree of risk; development of the susceptibility to becoming obese is strongly dependent on the interaction with environmental triggers.

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It also may be that various genes contribute a small increase in risk or that rare abnormalities in many genes create a predisposition to weight gain and obesity.

“An Invitation to Health” by Dianne Hales
from An Invitation to Health
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Some studies have shown a relationship between genetics and risk for excess weight gain (Fesinmeyer, North, Ritchie, et al, 2013; Hebebrand and Hinney, 2009); however, genetic factors do not act alone, existing and interacting with environmental and behavioral factors to predict obesity risk.

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from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
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Some studies have reported that the risk allele that confers a predisposition to obesity may play a role in the control of food intake and food choice, suggesting a link to a hyperphagic phenotype or a preference for energy-rich foods.

“Handbook of Anthropometry: Physical Measures of Human Form in Health and Disease” by Victor R. Preedy
from Handbook of Anthropometry: Physical Measures of Human Form in Health and Disease
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But today we know that we can decelerate the action of the genes that cause obesity and diabetes, triggering dramatic weight loss that’s not based on fewer calories, but on a healthy, sustainable, longterm diet plan.

“Zero Belly Diet: Lose Up to 16 lbs. in 14 Days!” by David Zinczenko
from Zero Belly Diet: Lose Up to 16 lbs. in 14 Days!
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Random House Publishing Group, 2014

This has led to speculation that adiposity genes are present at a higher frequency among heavy or obese parents, and that such genes are passed along to their offspring, increasing the genetic risk for obesity in this segment of the population.

“Eating Disorders and Obesity: A Comprehensive Handbook” by Christopher G. Fairburn, Kelly D. Brownell
from Eating Disorders and Obesity: A Comprehensive Handbook
by Christopher G. Fairburn, Kelly D. Brownell
Guilford Publications, 2002

A growing body of evidence suggests that some forms of obesity may result from biochemical defects rather than just consumption of excess calories.167,326 After a 40-year search, scientists originally found three genes linked to obesity (ob, neuropeptide Y[Npy], and the Beacon gene).

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Obesity develops as a consequence of genetic-environmental interactions, such that genetically prone individuals who lead a sedentary lifestyle and consume larger amounts of dietary calories are at higher risk.

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from Andreoli and Carpenter’s Cecil Essentials of Medicine E-Book
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Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • doctor 90 to google beach 1865.1870,1980,1900,10,20 30 40 NO FAT PEOPLE around the world in( pictures )/ the ice refrigerator came out for sales for homes 1940 & 1945 you SEE fat people in industrialized nation./ 2 Africa serengeti has 3 month of dried season & starvation,you see the ribs on animal & dried land EVERY animal suffer,(every year )
    yet they don’t have the starvation gene? why? because is a bullshit propaganda millions of years VS Human 1 to 2 million year = not true