How you can Help Develop Baby s Fine Motor Skills

 

Recorded Webinar Facilitating Motor Skill Development in Infants and Toddlers

Video taken from the channel: EITP Illinois


 

Developing Baby’s Fine Motor Coordination Skills

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Homemade fine motor activities (8 months to 2 years) Do it yourself!

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Develop Your Baby’s Fine Motor Skills: DIY Activity | Lovevery

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Fine Motor Development From Birth to 5

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Fine Motor Activites for BABY

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Pediatric Nursing Infants: Gross and Fine Motor Skills, Language and Age-appropriate Activities

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The most important fine motor skills children need to develop include the following: The palmar arches allow the palms to curl inward. Strengthening these helps coordinate the movement of finger. 4 ways to help your baby develop fine motor skills. Fine motor skills, like grabbing, pinching and forming words, usually develop in the first year.

Here’s how to help your baby advance their newly-discovered talent. Until she was about ten months old, Grace Power was happy to have her mother, Donna, spoon-feed her mashed-up veggies and cereal. Press a soft block between your baby’s hands for practice holding toys.

Shift your baby’s positions frequently. When an infant learns to play in a. An activity like threading is great for improving fine motor to strengthen hand muscles in order to prepare your child for movements like writing. Not only does it develop fine motor skills, but it is also a great quiet time and calming down activity.

Music – clap your hands, musical instruments, songs with hand movements (like “The Itsy Bitsy Spider”) Banging on pots and pans. Bead maze (they may not be able to move beads up and down yet, but it’ll still be great fine motor practice) Sign language – introduce Baby Sign Language or ASL to your baby early. There are lots of activities that can increase muscle strength and coordination, preparing children for more advanced skills, from writing with a pencil, using a computer mouse, or playing a musical instrument. Help your child build fine motor skills at home by providing opportunities to. Transfers objects between hands (beginning of crossing midline skills).

Grabs crayons with a fisted grasp. Can hold two small objects in one hand. Begins to show a preference for one hand over the other (beginning development of right handed vs. left handed).

Simple and engaging fine motor skills activities for babies and toddlers to help to encourage muscle strength, co-ordination and concentration The Imagination Tree Creative play and learning for kids. A natural area for building fine motor skills is at the highchair. Giving little ones, usually around nine to ten months, finger foods like O-shaped cereals, or other similar food is a great way for babies to practice their beginning pincher grasp and to build new foods into their diet at the same time.

Arts And Crafts Activities. Arts and crafts are a great way to get your child working on their fine motor skills.Here are some fun options that usually appeal to children: Coloring: Coloring books and crayons can be a great tool for improving fine motor skills.Holding the crayon, applying pressure, and staying within the lines all help increase fine motor ability.

List of related literature:

Next, infants play to explore their skills (FIGURE 19-4)—for example, playing with cubes, crawling backward down the stairs, or pushing a finger FIGURE 19-4 Developing Motor Skills by Exploring the Environment.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

You can learn about her abilities, needs, and development by observing her behavior and responses to your care, reading baby-care books, or attending parenting classes.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

Provide family caregivers with information about normal developmental activities appropriate for the infant and encourage them to provide sensory and cognitive stimulation.

“Broadribb's Introductory Pediatric Nursing” by Nancy T. Hatfield
from Broadribb’s Introductory Pediatric Nursing
by Nancy T. Hatfield
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007

Initially the adult who is nurturing the child will make eye contact, mirror actions from the baby such as poking their tongue out, talk to the baby, and comment on actions or routines being performed such as bathing, feeding, changing a nappy and so on.

“The Excellence Of Play” by Moyles, Janet
from The Excellence Of Play
by Moyles, Janet
McGraw-Hill Education (UK), 2014

Encourage parents to talk to, touch, and hold the baby; help with positioning.

“Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence E-Book: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating” by Rhea Paul, Courtenay Norbury
from Language Disorders from Infancy Through Adolescence E-Book: Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Communicating
by Rhea Paul, Courtenay Norbury
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Providing one to three key words as verbal feedback after the child has performed is recommended for motor learning.

“Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents E-Book” by Jane Case-Smith, Jane Clifford O'Brien
from Occupational Therapy for Children and Adolescents E-Book
by Jane Case-Smith, Jane Clifford O’Brien
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Simple games like Peek-a-Boo and talking to the baby, activities that foster social interaction, may be helpful, as might gentle sensory stimulation, like rocking or holding the baby.

“The Way I See it: A Personal Look at Autism and Asperger's” by Temple Grandin
from The Way I See it: A Personal Look at Autism and Asperger’s
by Temple Grandin
Future Horizons Incorporated, 2008

Teach them signs of overstimulation to help them adapt their interaction to meet the infant’s needs.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

developmental activities appropriate for the infant and encourage them to provide sensory and cognitive stimulation.

“Broadribb's Introductory Pediatric Nursing” by Nancy T. Hatfield
from Broadribb’s Introductory Pediatric Nursing
by Nancy T. Hatfield
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2003
from very early it is important that infants are provided with toys and activities that give them a chance to learn new skills and practice them.

“Parenthood in America: An Encyclopedia” by Lawrence Balter, Robert B. McCall
from Parenthood in America: An Encyclopedia
by Lawrence Balter, Robert B. McCall
ABC-CLIO, 2000

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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3 comments

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  • Cathy first off I wanna thank you for everything. You’ve been a great resource for my nursing school. I have a question did you delete your old ati videos? I actually liked those cuz they went by chapter

  • hi cathy, i didn’t make a lvl 3, but i was close. made a lvl 2 & it made a big difference in my grade, thank you for your efforts, you’re awesome!!!!

  • I love the ball with fabric. I have a 16 month old who loves balls, but not much else. Perfect for her. The tape on cookie sheets is a popular activity in our child care. We have dino and animal rescues, picking apples off a tree, and other themes that go along with our units of study. another home run video. Thanks for sharing Christina it’s always great on your channel.