How to deal with Grief Throughout the Holidays

 

Dealing with grief during the holidays

Video taken from the channel: CBC News: The National


 

Dealing With Grief During The Holidays

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Grief During the Holidays

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3 Tips on How To Cope With Grief During The Holidays

Video taken from the channel: Rebels For Joy


 

Tips on how to handle grief over the holidays

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How to Handle Grief During the Holiday Season

Video taken from the channel: Courtney Clark


 

Grief and Loss: Dealing w Death Anniversaries, Birthdays, Holidays 3 Min Therapy w:Dr Christina Hib

Video taken from the channel: Dr. Christina Hibbert


How to Handle the Grief of Separation Schedule brief visits. If you aren’t up for hosting the whole family for Thanksgiving or attending a big New Year’s Eve Set the table the way you want. Cooking a lavish meal with all the trimmings is a lot of effort, but you can still have Stay in touch. Organizing a holiday coat drive or joining an organization important to your deceased loved one, volunteering can help you better cope with your grief during and after the holiday season.

Research shows that giving your time to a good cause can reduce the risk of depression, lower stress and reignite a sense of purpose, among other benefits. If you have lost a loved one during the holiday season, and years later are still struggling with it, may I suggest that you haven’t fully grieved. You haven’t fully grieved the loss of the individual.

Or what the individual brought to your life during Christmas. You may have been harboring anger toward God, and not let it out. Let it all out. How to handle grief during the holidays.

While everyone has a different timeline for grieving and grieves in different ways, it is possible to cope during the holidays. With this in mind, perhaps you may even enjoy the time, though certainly in a different way than before. First, keep in mind it is difficult to make grief disappear during celebrations.

1. Acknowledge that the holidays will be different and they will be tough. 2. Decide which traditions you want to keep. 3. Decide which traditions you want to change. 4. Create a new tradition in memory of your loved one.

5. Decide where you want to spend the holidays – you may want to switch up. Write a love letter Smile a smile for them Light a red candle Tell someone about them. Organizing a holiday coat drive or joining an organization important to your deceased loved one, volunteering can help you better cope with your grief during and after the holiday season. Research shows that giving your time to a good cause can reduce the risk of depression, lower stress and reignite a sense of purpose, among other benefits.

Remember your friend or family member who has passed. Remember your loved one who is grieving. New losses are not easily forgettable.

As the years go by, life moves on; and, often, people move on too. If you were not personally connected to the grief, it may not occur to you how difficult this holiday season will be for the rest of their lives. Robert says if you start to notice dramatic changes in behavior — such as regressive behavior or acting out at home or school — you should consider taking your child to see a counselor.

The Amelia Center is a tremendous resource to help young people move through their grief during the holidays and beyond. Sanders led the recent class, “Holiday Hurt: Coping with Grief during the Holidays,” as part of ongoing class offerings at Teer House through Duke Medicine’s Department of Clinical Education and Professional Development. The class provided a place for those grieving to receive support at a time when the world seems intent on feeling merry.

List of related literature:

There is no right or wrong way to handle the holidays in grief.

“On Grief and Grieving: Finding the Meaning of Grief Through the Five Stages of Loss” by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, David Kessler
from On Grief and Grieving: Finding the Meaning of Grief Through the Five Stages of Loss
by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, David Kessler
Scribner, 2005

Let the mother and family know that they are heard and understood as they are trying to make sense of the loss and the emotions of grief.

“Study Guide for Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book” by Barbara L Yoost, Lynne R Crawford, Patricia Castaldi
from Study Guide for Fundamentals of Nursing E-Book
by Barbara L Yoost, Lynne R Crawford, Patricia Castaldi
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

• Encourage follow-up grief counseling and support groups.

“Sheehy’s Manual of Emergency Care E-Book” by ENA, Belinda B Hammond, Polly Gerber Zimmermann
from Sheehy’s Manual of Emergency Care E-Book
by ENA, Belinda B Hammond, Polly Gerber Zimmermann
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Talk to the family together, so that they can grieve together.

“Brunner & Suddarth's Canadian Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing” by Mohamed El Hussein, Joseph Osuji
from Brunner & Suddarth’s Canadian Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing
by Mohamed El Hussein, Joseph Osuji
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2019

There is no right way to cope with mourning.

“Everywoman: A Gynaecological Guide for Life” by Derek Llewellyn-Jones
from Everywoman: A Gynaecological Guide for Life
by Derek Llewellyn-Jones
Penguin Books Limited, 1998

• Encourage the family to follow comforting grief rituals such as interacting with nature, lighting votive candles, saying a prayer, or whatever ritual brings spiritual comfort in dealing with the loss.

“Nursing Diagnosis Handbook E-Book: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care” by Betty J. Ackley, Gail B. Ladwig
from Nursing Diagnosis Handbook E-Book: An Evidence-Based Guide to Planning Care
by Betty J. Ackley, Gail B. Ladwig
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Holidays may also reactivate grieving behaviors, especially those that bring together family and friends and recall memories of joy and happiness.

“Merenstein & Gardner's Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care E-Book: An Interprofessional Approach” by Sandra Lee Gardner, Brian S. Carter, Mary I Enzman-Hines, Susan Niermeyer
from Merenstein & Gardner’s Handbook of Neonatal Intensive Care E-Book: An Interprofessional Approach
by Sandra Lee Gardner, Brian S. Carter, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2020

• Talk to the family together so that they can grieve together and hear the information given together.

“Brunner & Suddarth's Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing” by Janice L. Hinkle, Kerry H. Cheever
from Brunner & Suddarth’s Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing
by Janice L. Hinkle, Kerry H. Cheever
Wolters Kluwer Health, 2013

I had dreaded Christmas for precisely this reason, knowing it would literally take days to get over such a dose of family exposure.

“Get Me Out of Here: My Recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder” by Rachel Reiland
from Get Me Out of Here: My Recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder
by Rachel Reiland
Hazelden Publishing, 2009

Remind yourself that the grieving person is going through something really hard that has nothing to do with you, even if it makes your brunch count uneven.

“The Hot Young Widows Club: Lessons on Survival from the Front Lines of Grief” by Nora McInerny
from The Hot Young Widows Club: Lessons on Survival from the Front Lines of Grief
by Nora McInerny
Simon & Schuster/ TED, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I try to celebrate my son’s anniversary of his death by transplanting dandelions in my one of my gardens every year, since when he was alive he used to always bring me bunches of dandelions always telling me ” These are for you momma “

  • What does it mean when someone dies on one year anniversary of someone else that they didn’t know? Someone who died of smoking at old age and someone who overdoeses on opiates? Is it just coincidence? And opiates overdoes is never intentional! Sorry about your sister but it’s possible she didn’t die intentionally.

  • I lost my sister unexpectedly 8 months ago its my first holiday season without my older sister Christmas was her favorite holiday everyone is forcing me to be somebody I’m not ready to be in your videos help me realize that it’s OK thank you Nicole your videos are a big help

  • Hope this article helps too, love to you all
    https://www.jw.org/en/publications/magazines/awake-no3-2018-nov-dec/coping-with-grief-do-today/

  • I like your honest approach.Sharing your own anger with your sister is comforting.  I plan to share this on my blog. Thank you for the work you do. I greatly appreciate the resources you provide. Simmer Dougherty AGoodMourning.com

  • IN THIS WEEK’S VIDEO:
    Please note, this video is extra long this week coming in at a whopping 8-minutes! But since depression and grief come in many shapes and sizes, I wanted to add as many tips as I could to help as many people as I could.

    Maybe this video isn’t for you this week, and I am grateful if it isn’t, but remember that someone you love could use this. So be sure to share this video with those who could use some help during this time because that is truly what this season is all about

    CHECK OUT OUR OTHER VIDEOS:

    ► How To Defeat Depression Once And For All! https://youtu.be/wn_Al5uYW9c
    ► 3 Tips On How To Stop Feeling Hurt https://youtu.be/QdT74svl-Bc
    ► It’s Ok to Not Be Ok. 4 Tips to Help You to Feel Better https://youtu.be/60MLsykbqB0

    ★★★ BEST IDEAS ★★★

    ( 1:05) Tip #1 Set realistic expectations with yourself. It’s OKAY to feel happy one minute and sad the next!

    ( 1:48) Tip #2 Try to avoid canceling. Connection is key!

    ( 2:49) Tip #3 Focus some time & energy on giving to those who have less than you do.

    ( 3:52) Tip #4 Create a new tradition or ritual that accommodates this new situation.

    ( 5:15) Tip #5 Stay off or limit your social media time!

    ( 6:10) Tip #6 Stop apologizing for your grief!

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  • Thanks! This was a real blessing. Today I was driving and realised I had an intense need to talk about my father who passed away earlier this year. Dr. Merry C Lin helped validate this as well as some other things as I grieve the loss of my father.