How Puzzles and Games May Help Your Aging Brain

 

Keeping your Brain Young

Video taken from the channel: Lee Health


 

Brain Puzzles and Games: Brain Wash walkthrough levels 1 to 100 (with Apple Pencil)

Video taken from the channel: Appysmarts


 

Keeping an Aging Brain Sharp

Video taken from the channel: CBS News


 

The Aging Brain

Video taken from the channel: AdvocateHealthCare


 

What Do Puzzles do to Your Brain? A Neurology Expert Explains

Video taken from the channel: Brut America


 

Memory and the Aging Brain

Video taken from the channel: NIH VideoCast


 

Understanding the Aging Brain — Professional Caregiver Webinar

Video taken from the channel: Caregiver Stress


Researchers looked at the “use it or lose it” theory on brain health. The concept holds that mentally engaging activities from reading to crosswords to board games may help the brain resist dementia later in life. How puzzles, games might help your aging brain by Amy Norton, Healthday Reporter (HealthDay)—Those Sunday crossword puzzles may not prevent the aging brain from slowing down—but they might protect. MONDAY, Dec.

10, 2018 (HealthDay News) Those Sunday crossword puzzles may not prevent the aging brain from slowing down but they might protect it in a different way, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at the “use it or lose it” theory on brain health. The concept holds that mentally engaging activities from reading to crosswords to board games may help the brain resist dementia later in life.

In this study, older adults who said they enjoyed those pastimes were no less likely to show signs of mental decline over time, versus other older folks. Those Sunday crossword puzzles may not prevent the aging brain from slowing down — but they might protect it in a different way, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at the “use it or lose it” theory on brain health.

How Puzzles, Games Might Help Your Aging Brain August 8, 2019 | News & Information Those Sunday crossword puzzles may not prevent the aging brain from slowing down — but they might protect it in a different way, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at the “use it or lose it” theory on brain health. MONDAY, Dec. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Those Sunday crossword puzzles may not prevent the aging brain from slowing down — but they might protect it in a different way, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at the “use it or lose it” theory on brain health. Staying active helps preserve your brain power. Those Sunday crossword puzzles may not prevent the ageing brain from slowing down – but they might protect it in a different way, a new study. How puzzles and games might help your ageing brain Those Sunday crossword puzzles may not prevent the ageing brain from slowing down – but they might protect it in a different way, a new study suggests. Researchers looked at the “use it or lose it” theory on brain health. The concept holds that mentally engaging activities – from.

Working on Puzzles Can Help Your Brain Feel ‘10 Years Younger’ Researchers say activities such as crossword puzzles maintain brain health in people ages 50 and older. Here are some other tips to.

List of related literature:

On the other hand, Scanlon et al. (2006, 2007a, b) found evidence of improvement in working memory, visual attention, and executive function among study participants who played Lumosity1 brain games (Lumos Labs, Inc., 2012) 20 min per day for 5 weeks.

“Game Analytics: Maximizing the Value of Player Data” by Magy Seif El-Nasr, Anders Drachen, Alessandro Canossa
from Game Analytics: Maximizing the Value of Player Data
by Magy Seif El-Nasr, Anders Drachen, Alessandro Canossa
Springer London, 2013

Overall, there is not strong evidence that brain-training games such as Lumosity are effective for young, healthy learners.

“Human Intelligence: An Introduction” by Robert J. Sternberg
from Human Intelligence: An Introduction
by Robert J. Sternberg
Cambridge University Press, 2019

Studies show that playing video games can have a positive effect on older adults’ well-being (Gerling & Masuch, 2011) and that video games involving memory and mathematical logic strengthen cognitive functions (Naqvi et al., 2013).

“Ageing and Digital Technology: Designing and Evaluating Emerging Technologies for Older Adults” by Barbara Barbosa Neves, Frank Vetere
from Ageing and Digital Technology: Designing and Evaluating Emerging Technologies for Older Adults
by Barbara Barbosa Neves, Frank Vetere
Springer Singapore, 2019

Brain training with video games enhances visuospatial working memory in older adults.

“Video Game Influences on Aggression, Cognition, and Attention” by Christopher J. Ferguson
from Video Game Influences on Aggression, Cognition, and Attention
by Christopher J. Ferguson
Springer International Publishing, 2018

Games that offer increasingly harder cognitive challenges—more accurate and challenging judgments and reactions at higher speeds, fully focused attention, increasing spans of working memory—drive positive brain changes.

“Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence” by Daniel Goleman
from Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence
by Daniel Goleman
Bloomsbury Publishing, 2013

There is continuing research that brain exercises (like Sudoku) can help “age-proof” your brain and help keep it functioning at peak capacity.

“Beyond Training: Mastering Endurance, Health & Life” by Ben Greenfield
from Beyond Training: Mastering Endurance, Health & Life
by Ben Greenfield
Victory Belt Publishing, 2017

Brain weight and volume decline linearly with age in the average population.66 Beginning at age 20, brain weight declines,66 the cortex thins,67 and the number of glial cells changes depending on type.

“Functional Movement Development Across the Life Span E-Book” by Donna J. Cech, Suzanne Tink Martin
from Functional Movement Development Across the Life Span E-Book
by Donna J. Cech, Suzanne Tink Martin
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Exercising, eat ing a healthy diet, solving puzzles, and staying intellectually active may slow or compensate for minor losses of cognitive prowess as people age (Whitbourne, 1996), although researchers haven’t established the effectiveness of “Brain Age” and similar products.

“50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior” by Scott O. Lilienfeld, Steven Jay Lynn, John Ruscio, Barry L. Beyerstein
from 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions about Human Behavior
by Scott O. Lilienfeld, Steven Jay Lynn, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

Attempting to play a new musical instrument changes the brain, as does playing board games, doing crossword or sudoku puzzles, or taking a college course, no matter how old we are.

“How Your Mind Can Heal Your Body: 10th Anniversary Edition” by David R. Hamilton, PHD
from How Your Mind Can Heal Your Body: 10th Anniversary Edition
by David R. Hamilton, PHD
Hay House, 2010

But before you run out and buy software or puzzle books for your aging brain, a simpler answer is close at hand—novelty.

“Inside the Investor's Brain: The Power of Mind Over Money” by Richard L. Peterson
from Inside the Investor’s Brain: The Power of Mind Over Money
by Richard L. Peterson
Wiley, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Hi,
    Please also consider making a gameplay walkthrough for this sci-fi brain teaser:
    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=defaulttm.gravity

    It’s not being released yet and is still in private beta.