Gums And Teeth Might Be Associated with Cancer Risk in Older Women

 

Gum disease can lead to this kind of cancer

Video taken from the channel: New York Daily News


 

UB study suggests connection between gum disease and cancer risk

Video taken from the channel: WIVBTV


 

Woman With Gum Disease More At Risk Of Getting Cancer, Study Says

Video taken from the channel: CBS Philly


 

Cancer and gum disease

Video taken from the channel: News4JAX


 

New Study Shows Gum Disease can DOUBLE your Risk of Lung Cancer

Video taken from the channel: Joseph R Nemeth DDS & Associates


 

Diabetes & Gum Disease are Connected!

Video taken from the channel: Joseph R Nemeth DDS & Associates


 

Gum Disease The Other Silent Killer

Video taken from the channel: Joseph R Nemeth DDS & Associates


But the greatest risk was for esophageal cancer, which was more than three times more likely in older women who had gum disease than those who didn’t. In addition, gum disease was associated with a. Gum Disease May Be Linked to Cancer Risk in Older Women TUESDAY, Aug.

1, 2017 A new study links gum disease with an increased risk of several types of cancer in postmenopausal women, even in women who never smoked. So-called periodontal disease was tied to a 14 percent higher risk of developing any type of cancer, the investigators found. But the greatest risk was for esophageal cancer, which was more than three times more likely in older women who had gum disease than those who didn’t.

In addition, gum disease was associated with a higher risk of lung cancer, gallbladder cancer, melanoma and breast cancer, the findings showed. Gum Disease May Be Linked to Cancer Risk in Older Women Esophageal, breast and lung cancer, among others, seen in postmenopausal women in large study Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. TUESDAY, Aug. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News)—A new study links gum disease with an increased risk of several types of cancer in postmenopausal women, even in women who never smoked. So-called periodontal disease was tied to a 14 percent higher risk of developing any type of cancer, the investigators found.

TUESDAY, Aug. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) A new study links gum disease with an increased risk of several types of cancer in postmenopausal women, even in women who never smoked. So-called periodontal disease was tied to a 14 percent higher risk of developing any type of cancer, the investigators found. A study published in the August issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention suggests a tie between the two, finding that older women with gum disease had a higher risk for cancers of the breast, lung, and esophagus as well as melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer. But it’s not time to sound the alarm just yet, because while the study was published in a well-regarded journal, it had.

Gum Disease Linked To Increased Cancer Risk in Older Women A recent study links an increased risk of certain types of cancer in postmenopausal women who have gum disease. The greatest risk increase – more than three times more likely – was for esophageal cancer in older women with gum disease. Women with gum disease may need to watch out for cancer New research has confirmed that periodontal disease is tied to an elevated risk of several types of cancer, such as esophageal cancer. Postmenopausal women who have a history of gum disease also have a higher risk of cancer, according to a new study of more than 65,000 women.

The study, led by UB researchers, is the first national study of its kind involving U.S. women, and the first to focus specifically on older women.

List of related literature:

Evidence is also mounting that chronic gum disease may be linked to systemic ailments, including an increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease and, in women, increased odds of delivering a low birthweight infant.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

Long-term issues with gum disease are linked to an increased cancer risk.

“Psychology: Australia and New Zealand” by Douglas A. Bernstein, Julie Ann Pooley, Lynne Cohen, Bethanie Gouldthorp, Stephen C. Provost, Jacquelyn Cranney, Louis A. Penner, Alison Clarke-Stewart, Edward J. Roy
from Psychology: Australia and New Zealand
by Douglas A. Bernstein, Julie Ann Pooley, et. al.
Cengage Learning Australia, 2017

Research also suggests gum disease can boost the risk for other serious health conditions, including heart disease, stroke, dia— betes, respiratory infections and premature birth.

“The Doctors Book of Home Remedies: Quick Fixes, Clever Techniques, and Uncommon Cures to Get You Feeling Better Fast” by Editors of Prevention
from The Doctors Book of Home Remedies: Quick Fixes, Clever Techniques, and Uncommon Cures to Get You Feeling Better Fast
by Editors of Prevention
Rodale Books, 2010

Periodontal disease (gum disease) and the increase in systemic C-reactive protein have been recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (arteriosclerosis), diabetes, and pancreatic cancer.

“Essentials of Human Diseases and Conditions” by Margaret Schell Frazier, RN, CMA, BS, Jeanette Drzymkowski, RN, BS
from Essentials of Human Diseases and Conditions
by Margaret Schell Frazier, RN, CMA, BS, Jeanette Drzymkowski, RN, BS
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

It is also possible that the varied bacteria involved in gum disease may contribute to the process of atherosclerosis.

“Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever” by Ray Kurzweil, Terry Grossman
from Transcend: Nine Steps to Living Well Forever
by Ray Kurzweil, Terry Grossman
Rodale Books, 2010

Tooth decay was also significantly associated with increased lung cancer risk.

“AACR 2018 Proceedings: Abstracts 3028-5930” by American Association for Cancer Research
from AACR 2018 Proceedings: Abstracts 3028-5930
by American Association for Cancer Research
CTI Meeting Technology, 2018

These hypotheses are not discussed further in this chapter, but they should alert the physician to the possibility that dental caries and periodontal disease are potential risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

“Infectious Diseases” by Sherwood L. Gorbach, John G. Bartlett, Neil R. Blacklow
from Infectious Diseases
by Sherwood L. Gorbach, John G. Bartlett, Neil R. Blacklow
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2004

Among adults aged 35 to 44, 48% have gingivitis, and 22 percent have destructive gum disease.

“Remington: The Science and Practice of Pharmacy” by David B. Troy, Joseph Price Remington, Paul Beringer
from Remington: The Science and Practice of Pharmacy
by David B. Troy, Joseph Price Remington, Paul Beringer
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006

But recent studies, first reported by scientists at the University of Liège in Belgium in 2002, have confirmed that periodontal disease is an important risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease.

“The Honey Prescription: The Amazing Power of Honey as Medicine” by Nathaniel Altman
from The Honey Prescription: The Amazing Power of Honey as Medicine
by Nathaniel Altman
Inner Traditions/Bear, 2010

These findings indicate not only that is there a significant percentage of the healthy population exposed to various gum products but also that these individuals immunologically react against them and produce IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated immune reactivity.

“Integrative and Functional Medical Nutrition Therapy: Principles and Practices” by Diana Noland, Jeanne A. Drisko, Leigh Wagner
from Integrative and Functional Medical Nutrition Therapy: Principles and Practices
by Diana Noland, Jeanne A. Drisko, Leigh Wagner
Springer International Publishing, 2020

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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4 comments

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  • Hello Dr.Nemeth, I need to ask you a question about the waterpik. Can I use it to rinse the front/back of my teeth including the top part of the molars? I have noticed that brushing doesn’t really remove the plaque that sits on the edges by the gumline that well. Same thing with the electric toothbrush regardless of which toothpaste I use. I feel that brushing is more abrasive and does less than the waterpik which is less abrasive and more efficient at removing plaque from your teeth. Especially plaque on the back molars. Thank you for your time and have a great day:)

  • You will find this article interesting. A bacteria that causes gingivitis is linked to Alzheimer’s. https://www.newscientist.com/article/2191814-we-may-finally-know-what-causes-alzheimers-and-how-to-stop-it/

  • I have a Root in my tooth and last year Im testing positive to diabetes. Can be this connected? I’m doing a lot of exercises a lot on my entire life.

  • My teeth are aching and will extract by itself one after the other. Having this problem a long time ago. Its true, my teeth all looks good on the outside. Now i only have 8 teeth left and the process goes on. Will anti bacterial antibiotics cure my gum problems?