Genetic Risks for Seating Disorder For You, Alcoholism Might Be Connected

 

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Genetic Risks for Eating Disorders, Alcoholism May Be Connected Privacy & Trust Info WEDNESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) Alcoholism and certain types of eating disorders share common genetic risk factors, according to a new study. Researchers looked at nearly 6,000 adult fraternal and identical twins in Australia. Genetic Risks for Eating Disorders, Alcoholism May Be Connected Twin study found ties between alcohol dependence and binge eating or purging Please note: This article was published more than one year ago.

The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. Genetic Risks for Eating Disorders, Alcoholism May Be Connected HealthyWomen Twin study found ties between alcohol dependence and binge eating or purging. WEDNESDAY, Aug.

21 (HealthDay News) Alcoholism and certain types of eating disorders share common genetic risk factors, according to a new study. Common genetic factors may be behind both alcoholism and specific symptoms of eating disorders — particularly the binge eating and purging habits of bulimia nervosa, according to new research. Alcohol use disorder (AUD) often seems to run in families, and we may hear about scientific studies of an “alcoholism gene.”. Genetics certainly influence our likelihood of developing AUD, but the story isn’t so simple. Research shows that genes are responsible for about half of the risk for AUD.

Therefore, genes alone do not determine whether someone will develop AUD. Statistically, a family history of alcoholism is linked to an increased risk of genetic predisposition to alcoholism, depending on how close the relatives are to each other. Children who have one parent who struggles with alcohol use disorder have a 3-4 times increased risk of becoming an alcoholic themselves. Genetic risk factors for eating disorders: an update and insights into pathophysiology Show all authors for example etanercept, have been used in other psychiatric disorders and may, Mazurek, U. Preliminary study of the expression of genes connected with the orexigenic and anorexigenic system using microarray technique in anorexia. Genetic connections between substance abuse and eating disorders have also been confirmed in numerous research studies, suggesting that there are at least some inherent factors that may be common to these behaviors.

Strong inherent factors may also contribute to the strong comorbidity eating disorders share with many other mental health. “During puberty, there is an increased risk for developing an eating disorder,” said Klump. “Up to 50 percent of this risk can be attributed to genetic factors that emerge during puberty.” Klump’s research looked at more than 500 female 14-year-old twins who were examined using sophisticated statistical modeling techniques. Eating disorders (EDs) occur in approximately 0.5–3.0% of the population, with more affected females than males (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000).The female-to-male ratio of ED diagnoses in nonclinical populations has been estimated at 10:1 ().However, recent research indicates a ratio of 4:1 for anorexia nervosa (AN; Woodside et al., 2001).

List of related literature:

Research evidence in support of a common genetic predisposition to both eating disorders and alcohol use disorders include higher rates of eating disorders in adult children of alcoholics (e.g., Jonas and Gold 1988) and high rates of family history of alcohol abuse in bulimic patients (Bulik 1987).

“Handbook of Behavior, Food and Nutrition” by Victor R. Preedy, Ronald Ross Watson, Colin R. Martin
from Handbook of Behavior, Food and Nutrition
by Victor R. Preedy, Ronald Ross Watson, Colin R. Martin
Springer New York, 2011

It seems likely that whatever its genetic basis, inherited vulnerability for alcoholism can be moderated by experiential factors (cf.

“Psychological Theories of Drinking and Alcoholism” by Kenneth E. Leonard, Howard T. Blane
from Psychological Theories of Drinking and Alcoholism
by Kenneth E. Leonard, Howard T. Blane
Guilford Publications, 1999

Further, genetic processes only account for about 50% of the risk for alcohol-use disorders.

“Interventions for Addiction: Comprehensive Addictive Behaviors and Disorders, Volume 3” by Peter M. Miller
from Interventions for Addiction: Comprehensive Addictive Behaviors and Disorders, Volume 3
by Peter M. Miller
Elsevier Science, 2013

Current evidence indicates that genetic risk for developing alcoholism is: A. Mediated by a single gene.

“Brody's Human Pharmacology E-Book” by Lynn Wecker, Lynn Crespo, George Dunaway, Carl Faingold, Stephanie Watts
from Brody’s Human Pharmacology E-Book
by Lynn Wecker, Lynn Crespo, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

These include the extent of genetic predisposition to FAS, the risk of binge drinking, the role of moderate and social drinking, and the safe level of alcohol in pregnancy.

“Medical Genetics E-Book” by Lynn B. Jorde, John C. Carey, Michael J. Bamshad
from Medical Genetics E-Book
by Lynn B. Jorde, John C. Carey, Michael J. Bamshad
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

This strong family transmission patterns for Type II alcoholism has implicated genetic factors as making a substantial contribution to this form of the disease (Cloninger et al. 1981).

“Handbook of Crime Correlates” by Lee Ellis, Kevin M. Beaver, John Wright
from Handbook of Crime Correlates
by Lee Ellis, Kevin M. Beaver, John Wright
Elsevier Science, 2009

It has also been proposed that this extreme variability in clinical liver disease between individuals would indicate the existence of other important environmental (alcohol, viral infection) or genetic disease modifiers affecting many other parts of the pathophysiological cascade.

“Textbook of Hepatology: From Basic Science to Clinical Practice” by Juan Rodés, Jean-Pierre Benhamou, Andres Blei, Juerg Reichen, Mario Rizzetto, Jean-Francois Dufour, Scott L. Friedman, Pere Ginès, Dominique-Charles Valla, Fabien Zoulim, Neil McIntyre
from Textbook of Hepatology: From Basic Science to Clinical Practice
by Juan Rodés, Jean-Pierre Benhamou, et. al.
Wiley, 2008

Therefore, both alcoholism and alcoholic cirrhosis are probably the results of genetic-environmental interactions.

“Diet and Health: Implications for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk” by National Research Council, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Commission on Life Sciences, Committee on Diet and Health
from Diet and Health: Implications for Reducing Chronic Disease Risk
by National Research Council, Division on Earth and Life Studies, et. al.
National Academies Press, 1989

It appears likely that it is the accumulation of both genetic and psychosocial risk factors that increases the risk for alcohol abuse and dependence.

“Reducing Risks for Mental Disorders: Frontiers for Preventive Intervention Research” by Institute of Medicine, Committee on Prevention of Mental Disorders, Robert J. Haggerty, Patricia J. Mrazek
from Reducing Risks for Mental Disorders: Frontiers for Preventive Intervention Research
by Institute of Medicine, Committee on Prevention of Mental Disorders, et. al.
National Academies Press, 1994

Twin and adoption studies have resolved the issue: they show that genetic factors play a key role in the vulnerability to alcoholism (McGue, 1999).

“Psychology: From Inquiry to Understanding” by Scott Lilienfeld, Steven Jay Lynn, Laura Namy, Nancy Woolf, Graham Jamieson, Anthony Marks, Virginia Slaughter
from Psychology: From Inquiry to Understanding
by Scott Lilienfeld, Steven Jay Lynn, et. al.
Pearson Higher Education AU, 2014

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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16 comments

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  • I think I have an eating disorder but I don’t know, I restrict a lot, I haven’t eaten in 2 and a half days, sometimes I binge and then purge but I’m overweight so I don’t know if it counts, I’ve also been told that guys can’t get an eating disorder

  • This is my video!! I’m so glad you addressed this. My ED starting out as restrictive/purge through exercise, but the last 4 or so years it has shifted completely to bulimia, which then merged with my addiction to alcohol. I got into a destructive drinking-binging-purging pattern, and so in essence my alcoholism and ED became one and the same. And having been in treatment for both, I can tell you that alcoholism is a very very common component of EDs, but is rarely addressed as thoroughly as it should be in ED treatment programs, because both things have to be addressed simultaneously for true recovery to be possible. I was lucky to find a PHP with an addictions group and a team who was adamant that I take steps to address my alcoholism as part of my overall treatment there. Thanks to whoever brought up this topic!

  • You do realise if you search up eating disorders the symptoms are eating too little and being sick after eating can people stop saying overweight is a part of eating disorder.I do realise that no one in the comment section are talking about being overweight but when you see people talking about eating disorder they always talk about being overweight that’s got nothing to do with eating disorder

  • I am the poster child for this behavior. When I left treatment the last time for my bulimia (that center was particularly horrific and put so much weight on me in a few short weeks), I started drinking to cope with the anxiety over my new body. That was 8 years ago, and the drinking is now my biggest problem. The two are definitely linked and impulsivity and anxiety are majors parts of both.

  • i was watching an old video of yours talking about suicide hotline. i’ve been wanting to call one but i’m in Asia but im a english speaker does suicide hotlines work international? like can i call an American hotline in asia?

  • could you make a video about depression and drug addiction? an artist called lil peep died a few days ago of a drug overdose and ive seen so many people saying drug addiction isnt an illness and that he deserved it im so sad he was an angel

  • Hi Kati, just in case you read this. I have an eating disorder and my friends don’t really know how bad it is. And I constantly see them eat even less than me. And if I see them running around half a day without even getting hungry, it really hurts because it is so easy for them to not eat, while I’m starving myself without being able to stop. Is this normal? And should I tell them how I feel? I really don’t wanna be a burdon and tell them what to do just because of my habits.

  • Hey Kati, what do you think of mental illness merch? For example there was a necklace that said, “social anxiety intensifies,” or a candy box that says, “obsessive candy disorder.” Do you think it trivialises mental illnesses, or do you think that this could be a fun way to just inform people you know about your health, or the candy box could also be intended to be a self care box if you have OCD (although it did actually have candy in it, but it would be a pretty good way to reuse it)?

  • One thing I have to add is that there is medicine for anorexia. It’s called FOOD = unrestricted eating. This disorder has to do a lot with malnutrition
    So eating without limits and rules, without compensation and without judgment will jumpstart the recovery process followed by retraining our minds (belief systems/fears) with truth and right actions

  • Great info as usual katie�� I do have a QUESTION though. My therapist says that I will be ending therapy soon because I’m doing better. But I feel like we’re breaking up. How do I deal with therapy comin to an end?

  • Hey Kati is it possible for you to turn your positive coping/distraction techniques into distraction for the wrong reasons ie drawing to distract from doing what your meant to be doing

  • also if they drink until they throw up that can be a what causes the bulimia as well especially if they had that before they were drinking

    thank you so much for this awesomely ha bisky vid i love this so much i never really thought to much about this even though there are some peoples in my family who over drink or even have alcoholism (one person in my family is stopping or at least i hope they do) i am not blood related to any of the alcoholics they are still technically part of my family though

  • I never had thought of this!! Thank you for always teaching us new things! Quick question I don’t feel like my bulimia is taken seriously. What can I do to get it taken seriously?! Thank you! ��

  • How can I contact you privately as I would like to contact you but don’t necessarily want to share it to the whole world. I love your videos so much and even when videoed relate to me can be very interesting and teaches me about how others are struggling.

  • I used to use alcohol without eating and then I’d become really sick and it felt really good because it felt like purging but I didn’t even eat

  • Hey Kati, I have a friend who thinks they are connected to some greater power so they have supernatural powers and psychic abilities. I think this a coping mechanism, but I’m not sure. What should I do? Should I support these beliefs or openly question them? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks