Gene Test Might At some point Gauge Your Cardiac Arrest Risk

 

Heart Disease: The Genetics Behind It.

Video taken from the channel: UT Health Science Center at Tyler


 

Genetic testing for risk of Heart Disease: fact or fiction? (23 Feb 2012)

Video taken from the channel: UCL Minds Lunch Hour Lectures


 

Finding genes that cause heart disease

Video taken from the channel: British Heart Foundation


 

Stanford: Genetic Testing and Advanced Care for Families With Heart Disease

Video taken from the channel: Stanford Health Care


 

Genetic testing in cardiovascular disease

Video taken from the channel: Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research


 

Heart Disease Risk & Genetic Markers

Video taken from the channel: Cleveland Clinic


 

Genes, lifestyle, and risk for heart attack

Video taken from the channel: NIH VideoCast


The so-called “polygenic risk score” analysis looks for key heart disease indicators genetic “biomarkers” along with an individual’s entire genetic blueprint, or genome. Prior research had. And a gene test might someday help predict who’s most endangered, according to a study presented this weekend at the American Heart Association’s annual meeting in. The so-called “polygenic risk score” analysis looks for key heart disease indicators genetic “biomarkers” along with an individual’s entire genetic blueprint, or genome.

Prior research had already suggested that this type of analysis could determine heart attack risk for people of European descent with no prior heart attack history. But the new analysis suggests the approach can work just as well in other populations. And a gene test might someday help predict who’s most endangered, according to a study presented this weekend at the American Heart Association’s annual meeting in Philadelphia. Researchers said they have identified a group of 14 gene variants that appear to be linked to sudden cardiac death. Perhaps, researchers say.READ: What’s Your Heart Attack Risk?A team of Canadian researchers found that by analyzing a person’s entire genome, it might Gene Test Might Someday Gauge Your Heart Attack Risk | HealthyWomen.

The so-called “polygenic risk score” analysis looks for key heart disease indicators genetic “biomarkers” along with an individual’s entire genetic blueprint, or genome. Prior research had already suggested that this type of analysis could determine heart attack risk for people of European descent with no prior heart attack history. But the new analysis suggests the approach can work just.

The so-called “polygenic risk score” analysis looks for key heart disease indicators genetic “biomarkers” along with an individual’s entire genetic blueprint, or genome. Prior research had already suggested that this type of analysis could determine heart attack risk for people of European descent with no prior heart attack history. The so-called “polygenic risk score” analysis looks for key heart disease indicators — genetic “biomarkers” — along with an individual’s entire genetic blueprint, or genome. Prior research had already suggested that this type of analysis could determine heart attack risk for people of European descent with no prior heart attack history.

Gene Test Might Someday Gauge Your Cardiac Arrest Risk. MONDAY, Nov. 18, 2019 Sudden cardiac death is terrifying because it’s exactly that one minute you’re fine and the next you’re facing death, with no warning and no prior symptoms.

Now, new research shows the secret to who’s at risk for cardiac arrest and who isn’t could lie in people’s genes. And a gene test might someday help predict who’s. Gene Test Might Someday Gauge Your Heart Attack Risk TUESDAY, June 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) Can a DNA test predict a person’s future heart health?

Perhaps, researchers say.

List of related literature:

With genetic testing of individuals in families in which cardiovascular disease is rampant, early therapeutic interventions (e.g., aggressive lipid-lowering agents and aggressive use of antihypertensives) may prevent disease.

“Mosby's Canadian Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests E-Book” by Kathleen Deska Pagana, Timothy J. Pagana, Sandra A. Pike-MacDonald
from Mosby’s Canadian Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests E-Book
by Kathleen Deska Pagana, Timothy J. Pagana, Sandra A. Pike-MacDonald
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Although a family history is helpful in identifying families at risk for CVD, genetic testing is more accurate and—if confirmed—more predictive among individuals in such a family.

“Mosby's Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests E-Book” by Kathleen Deska Pagana, Timothy J. Pagana
from Mosby’s Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests E-Book
by Kathleen Deska Pagana, Timothy J. Pagana
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Sickle cell trait in either parent or a family history of Huntington’s chorea does not increase the risk of maternal complications although genetic counselling with regard to the risk of the fetus inheriting sickle cell anaemia or Huntington’s chorea should be offered.

“Essential MCQs in Obstetrics and Gynaecology for Medical Students” by Diana Hamilton-Fairley
from Essential MCQs in Obstetrics and Gynaecology for Medical Students
by Diana Hamilton-Fairley
PasTest, 2003

The father’s increased carrier risk in this scenario derives almost entirely from the probability that he has the 2+0 genotype; this is unsurprising since the grandfather’s three-copy test result demonstrates the presence of a two-copy allele in the family.

“Molecular Pathology in Clinical Practice” by Debra G.B. Leonard
from Molecular Pathology in Clinical Practice
by Debra G.B. Leonard
Springer International Publishing, 2016

III/B 47,58 Measure TSH receptor antibody titer in late pregnancy (6 mo); if high, there is a risk of neonatal thyrotoxicosis.

“High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult” by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, Carl P. Weiner, Bernard Gonik
from High Risk Pregnancy E-Book: Management Options Expert Consult
by David K. James, Philip J. Steer, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Screening can be done by assessing activated protein C resistance using a second-generation coagulation assay, followed by genotyping for the FVL mutation if the resistance is found in a pregnant or nonpregnant woman.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Joshua Copel, Robert M Silver
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

If genetic testing is not available or the mutation that is responsible has not been identified, all direct relatives should be tested first with basic anamnesis and a basal ECG.

“Electrophysiological Disorders of the Heart E-Book” by Sanjeev Saksena, A. John Camm
from Electrophysiological Disorders of the Heart E-Book
by Sanjeev Saksena, A. John Camm
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

The laboratory can then test for specific mutations based on this information and will be able to identify β-thalassemia in 90% ofcases.

“Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book” by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, Henry L Galan, Eric R. M. Jauniaux, Mark B Landon, Joe Leigh Simpson, Deborah A Driscoll
from Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies E-Book
by Steven G. Gabbe, Jennifer R. Niebyl, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

For this reason, determining a genetic risk score may ultimately prove to be most useful in infants and children (whose parents may not be old enough to have developed coronary artery disease) for the purpose of determining lifetime cardiovascular risk and engaging in more stringent primordial prevention practices.

“Preventive Cardiology: A Companion to Braunwald's Heart Disease E-Book” by Roger Blumenthal, JoAnne Foody, Nathan D. Wong
from Preventive Cardiology: A Companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease E-Book
by Roger Blumenthal, JoAnne Foody, Nathan D. Wong
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

There are insufficient data regarding malformation risk in humans, but a major teratogenic potential appears unlikely.

“Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation: Treatment Options and Risk Assessment” by Christof Schaefer, Paul W.J. Peters, Richard K Miller
from Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation: Treatment Options and Risk Assessment
by Christof Schaefer, Paul W.J. Peters, Richard K Miller
Elsevier Science, 2014

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
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3 comments

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  • Thank you NIH for sharing this informative video! �� For anyone who’s interested, Dr.Sekar’s researches are available at: http://www.kathiresanlab.org/ ��

  • This was a great presentation. Thank you NIH for posting it. The most interesting part for me was learning that high HDL cholesterol, while correlated with reduced risk of heart attack, is NOT itself causal. It is what is called a non-causal marker. Triglyerides, specifically low triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL), are really what is important for reducing heart attack risk. That part of the presentation starts about 41 minutes in.

  • When you make a career out of judging other people’s habits and trying to dictate how they should live that is truly the pinnacle of psychosis in fact,live and let live you club of psychopaths!!!