For that Babies from the Opioid Crisis, the very best Care Might Be Mother s Recovery

 

Ep. 5: The Tiniest Victims of the Opioid Crisis Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Video taken from the channel: UA College of Medicine Phoenix


 

Program sets drug-dependent babies, moms on path to recovery

Video taken from the channel: WPRI


 

How to Help Opiate Exposed Babies | Barry Halpern | TEDxColumbus

Video taken from the channel: TEDx Talks


 

Stigma and OUD What pediatricians need to know in caring for mothers and infants

Video taken from the channel: aaptv


 

Opioid Epidemic: Helping Moms and Babies on their Journey to Better Health

Video taken from the channel: Dartmouth-Hitchcock


 

For Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, Best Care May Be Mom’s Recovery

Video taken from the channel: podnews


 

What Happens to Compassion During an Opioid Crisis?

Video taken from the channel: The Schwartz Center for Compassionate Healthcare


The Foster Care System Is Flooded With Children Of The Opioid Epidemic Merhar says what her team found was a call to action. “Most of these. Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a nonprofit news service covering health issues. For The Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, The Best Care May Be Mom’s Recovery Research is just beginning to point toward the answers. 05/31/2018 11:05 am ET.

For The Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, The Best Care May Be Mom’s Recovery. By Sarah Jane Tribble, Kaiser Health News. May 10, 2018 2:15:16.

For The Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, The Best Care May Be Mom’s Recovery. By Sarah Jane and her babies were born with neonatal abstinence syndrome, which. For the babies of the opioid crisis, the best care may be mom’s recovery The halls at UNC Horizons day care are quiet at 5 p.m. The halls at UNC Horizons day care are quiet at 5 p.m. For Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, Best Care May Be Mom’s Recovery. On average, a baby is born in withdrawal from opioids every 15 minutes in the U.S., according to recent research.

For the Babies of the Opioid Crisis, the Best Care May Be Mom’s Recovery Children exposed to opioids during pregnancy have certain early and late challenges, and helping their Moms may be the best medicine for them and helping with the consequences of neonatal abstinence syndrome. For the babies of the opioid crisis, the best care may be mom’s recovery. Sarah Jane Tribble, Kaiser Health News Williammee, 25, has struggled with addiction since she was a 19-year-old college student. She injected opioids during both of her pregnancies, and her babies were born with neonatal abstinence syndrome, which includes. For Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, Best Care May Be Mom’s Recovery. By editor • May 8, 2018. the little girl was born with neonatal abstinence syndrome — a condition that includes opioid.

For Babies Of The Opioid Crisis, Best Care May Be Mom’s Recovery | WBUR News Early findings on infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome are reassuring, and doctors are optimistic that normal.

List of related literature:

When caregivers know in advance that a mother is taking opiates or other drugs, they can anticipate neonatal withdrawal and plan care accordingly.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

The long-term consequences of prenatal opioid dependence are poorly understood, but it may be best to maintain the mother on methadone and treat the infant with opioids rather than withdraw the mother before parturition.

“Brody's Human Pharmacology E-Book” by Lynn Wecker, Lynn Crespo, George Dunaway, Carl Faingold, Stephanie Watts
from Brody’s Human Pharmacology E-Book
by Lynn Wecker, Lynn Crespo, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Infants exposed to opiates in utero, may, with full breastfeeding and continued treatment of the mother with opioid replacement therapy develop milder withdrawal symptoms than a non-breastfed infant.

“Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation: Treatment Options and Risk Assessment” by Christof Schaefer, Paul W.J. Peters, Richard K Miller
from Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation: Treatment Options and Risk Assessment
by Christof Schaefer, Paul W.J. Peters, Richard K Miller
Elsevier Science, 2014

Unless the mother is enrolled in a methadone rehabilitation program, she seldom risks calling attention to her habit by seeking prenatal care.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Ascertaining a patient’s in utero exposures is equally important for mothers in addiction recovery programs as the mother may have continued use of prescribed opioids (e.g., methadone) in addition to other legal substances, such as tobacco cigarettes, even though she may no longer use illegal drugs.

“Pediatric Swallowing and Feeding: Assessment and Management, Third Edition” by Joan C. Arvedson, Linda Brodsky, Maureen A. Lefton-Greif
from Pediatric Swallowing and Feeding: Assessment and Management, Third Edition
by Joan C. Arvedson, Linda Brodsky, Maureen A. Lefton-Greif
Plural Publishing, Incorporated, 2019

Mothers on methadone maintenance or other treatments for opioid dependence who are receiving proper care and counseling through substance abuse treatment programs should be encouraged to breastfeed with close follow-up (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2012).

“Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician” by Marsha Walker
from Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician
by Marsha Walker
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Even babies born to mothers in opioid addiction treatment are likely to suffer these issues because treatment options for the mother are still opioids.

“Introduction to Health Care Management” by Sharon B. Buchbinder, Nancy H. Shanks, Bobbie J Kite
from Introduction to Health Care Management
by Sharon B. Buchbinder, Nancy H. Shanks, Bobbie J Kite
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Nonetheless, converging evidence suggests that infants who are born to opioid-dependent mothers are characterized by two major features: poorer intrauterine growth and an increased risk of the withdrawal syndrome NAS.309,538-540,551,576-589

“Volpe's Neurology of the Newborn E-Book” by Joseph J. Volpe, Terrie E Inder, Basil T. Darras, Linda S. de Vries, Adre J du Plessis, Jeffrey Neil, Jeffrey M Perlman
from Volpe’s Neurology of the Newborn E-Book
by Joseph J. Volpe, Terrie E Inder, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Neonates whose mothers are addicted can experience opioid withdrawal, as will be discussed later.

“Psychiatry” by Allan Tasman, Jerald Kay, Jeffrey A. Lieberman, Michael B. First, Mario Maj
from Psychiatry
by Allan Tasman, Jerald Kay, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

Symptoms of opioid withdrawal may further complicate the newborn’s prospects if their mother is herself experiencing postnatal complications along with the mental and physical discomforts of opioid withdrawal.

“Social Work Perspectives on Human Behavior” by Margarete Parrish
from Social Work Perspectives on Human Behavior
by Margarete Parrish
McGraw-Hill Education, 2014

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]e.edu
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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