For Rural Patients, Opioid Centers Frequently Too Much Away

 

Responding to the Opioid Epidemic (Part 2 of 3)

Video taken from the channel: American Planning Association


 

Webinar — Buprenorphine and Methadone in Pregnancy 12/20/2017

Video taken from the channel: California Health Care Foundation


 

Opioid Use Disorder Treatment: Current Challenges and Future Advances

Video taken from the channel: Michigan Medicine


 

Medication First: Integration of Opioid Use Disorder Treatment Across the Healthcare System

Video taken from the channel: TheIRETAchannel


 

Telemedicine for Rural Opioid Crisis: Videoconferencing for Training Doctors on Opioid Addiction

Video taken from the channel: HEC Science & Technology


 

How one group of doctors drastically decreased opioid prescriptions

Video taken from the channel: PBS NewsHour


 

Dr. Andrew Kolodny: The Prescription Opioid Addiction Crisis (9/22/2016)

Video taken from the channel: California Health Care Foundation


For Rural Patients, Opioid Treatment Centers Often Too Far Away. TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 Methadone is often used in the fight against opioid addiction, but long travel times in rural areas may be hampering efforts to get more people treated, a new study finds. If methadone for opioid addiction was available in primary care clinics, more people would have better access to treatment.

For Rural Patients, Opioid Treatment Centers Often Too Far Away. Oct. 1, 2019. Oct. 1, 2019, at 12:00 p.m.

More. For Rural Patients, Opioid Treatment Centers Often Too Far Away. centers. In. For Rural Patients, Opioid Treatment Centers Often Too Far Away Privacy & Trust Info TUESDAY, Oct. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) Methadone is often used in the fight against opioid addiction, but long travel times in rural areas may be hampering efforts to get more people treated, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers looked at drive times to OTPs in rural and urban counties in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia and West Virginia. These states are among those hardest hit by the opioid epidemic. Drive time is important because methadone treatment requires six visits a week to an OTP, the study authors noted. The scholars found that on average, methadone patients would need to drive about 37 minutes to the nearest opioid treatment program – though travel times ranged as high as 49 minutes in the most rural areas. Strategies for Addressing Opioid Use Disorder in Rural Areas The opioid epidemic has disproportionately affected rural communities.

To tackle this crisis, care models are gaining political buy-in. The CDC analyzed patient opioid prescription data from Athenahealth and found that the percentage of patients prescribed an opioid was higher in rural. Key Rural Resources The Rural Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders Toolkit presents resources, models, and program examples to guide the development and implementation of successful substance abuse prevention and treatment programs for rural communities. In the sections below, you’ll find program models from this toolkit that can be used to address specific aspects of opioid. clinicians treating patients with chronic pain (excluding those patients under active cancer treatment, palliative care, and end-of-life care).

Overall, the CDC Guideline was intended to ensure patients have chronic pain treatment while reducing the risk of opioid use disorder, overdose, and death. 8. The recommendations in the Guideline are. More Kids, Teens Landing in ERs After Opioid Overdoses; For Rural Patients, Opioid Treatment Centers Often Too Far Away; Purdue Pharma to Settle Opioid Crisis Lawsuits, May Pay Up to $12 Billion; 1 more.

Opioid Prescriptions to Teens, Young Adults Still Common; Questions and Answers.

List of related literature:

Many patients are willing to travel long distances to receive primary medical care but not to access pharmacy services.

“Managed Care Pharmacy Practice” by Robert Navarro
from Managed Care Pharmacy Practice
by Robert Navarro
Aspen Publishers, 1999

A few patients who reside in states or communities without opioid agonist clinics or in rural areas invest considerable effort in traveling to other states or cities to obtain treatment; most who cannot afford the time or cost simply must forgo it (28).

“Principles of Addiction Medicine” by Richard K. Ries, Shannon C. Miller, David A. Fiellin
from Principles of Addiction Medicine
by Richard K. Ries, Shannon C. Miller, David A. Fiellin
Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Over the following days, the provider works with the nurse and family over the phone to titrate the opioids to adequately control pain.

“Evidence-Based Practice of Palliative Medicine E-Book” by Nathan E Goldstein, R. Sean Morrison
from Evidence-Based Practice of Palliative Medicine E-Book
by Nathan E Goldstein, R. Sean Morrison
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Rather than try to capture the local patient volume for every service, then, rural providers should select the services they will perform while in other services distinguishing themselves through the quality of their relationships with excellent providers, modifying facilities and staff accordingly.

“Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-based Competition on Results” by Michael E. Porter, Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg
from Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-based Competition on Results
by Michael E. Porter, Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg
Harvard Business Review Press, 2006

Many areas of the country have limited numbers of opioid treatment facilities or facilities that lack the capacity to meet demand (see Figure 4-9).

“Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use” by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Committee on Pain Management and Regulatory Strategies to Address Prescription Opioid Abuse, Jonathan K. Phillips, Morgan A. Ford, Richard J. Bonnie
from Pain Management and the Opioid Epidemic: Balancing Societal and Individual Benefits and Risks of Prescription Opioid Use
by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2017

At this stage of the epidemic, the majority of opioid usage has shifted to rural and suburban areas where people are increasingly isolated and using opioids alone.

“Proceedings of the Future Technologies Conference (FTC) 2018: Volume 2” by Kohei Arai, Rahul Bhatia, Supriya Kapoor
from Proceedings of the Future Technologies Conference (FTC) 2018: Volume 2
by Kohei Arai, Rahul Bhatia, Supriya Kapoor
Springer International Publishing, 2018

Patients visiting ERs for opioid refills are at particularly high risk of comorbid substance abuse.

“Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences” by Robert B. Daroff, Michael J. Aminoff
from Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences
by Robert B. Daroff, Michael J. Aminoff
Elsevier Science, 2014

The administration of opioids by this route is often limited to areas where there are high staff to patient ratios.

“Nursing the Surgical Patient” by Rosemary Pudner
from Nursing the Surgical Patient
by Rosemary Pudner
Elsevier, 2005

Perhaps two or more rural-based clinics could temporarily pool their resources within a locally centered clinic or to accommodate a larger volume of patients.

“Physician Practice Management: Essential Operational and Financial Knowledge” by Lawrence F. Wolper
from Physician Practice Management: Essential Operational and Financial Knowledge
by Lawrence F. Wolper
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2012

Distances between resources and clientele are also frequently reported as obstacles for those seeking access: “The patient may often drive 1 hour or more to receive treatment at an outpatient clinic….

“The Lighthouse Handbook on Vision Impairment and Vision Rehabilitation: Two-volume Set” by Barbara Silverstone, Mary Ann Lang, Bruce Rosenthal, Eleanor E. Faye
from The Lighthouse Handbook on Vision Impairment and Vision Rehabilitation: Two-volume Set
by Barbara Silverstone, Mary Ann Lang, et. al.
Oxford University Press, USA, 2000

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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