Fitful Sleep Might Take Toll on Older Women’s Hearts

 

Lack of sleep and heart disease

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Fitful Sleep May Take Toll on Older Women’s Hearts Before and after menopause, less sleep linked to plaque buildup in blood vessels, study found From the WebMD Archives. THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News)—The sleep woes that many women suffer during menopause may be more than a nuisance: New research suggests a link between lost sleep and an increase in risk factors for heart disease and stroke. THURSDAY, Oct.

6, 2016 (HealthDay News) The sleep woes that many women suffer during menopause may be more than a nuisance: New research suggests a link between lost sleep and an increase in risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Fitful sleep may take toll on older women’s hearts by Kathleen Doheny, Healthday Reporter (HealthDay)—The sleep woes that many women suffer during menopause may be more than a nuisance: New. Fitful Sleep May Take Toll on Older Women’s Hearts Before and after menopause, less sleep linked to plaque buildup in blood vessels, study found Please note: This article was published more than one year ago.

The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. Fitful Sleep May Take Toll on Older Women’s Hearts Before and after menopause, less sleep linked to plaque buildup in blood vessels, study found The sleep woes that many women suffer during menopause may be more than a nuisance: New research suggests a link between lost sleep and an increase in risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Fitful Sleep May Take Toll on Older Women’s Hearts THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) The sleep woes that many women suffer during menopause may be more than a nuisance: New research suggests a link between lost sleep and an increase in risk factors for heart disease and stroke. The sleep woes that many women suffer during menopause may be more than a nuisance: New research suggests a link between lost sleep and an increase in risk factors for heart disease and stroke.

Older Women’s Hearts Impacted by Fitful Sleep New research suggests that the sleep woes experienced by women in menopause may be past just nuisance. The loss of sleep is linked to heart disease and stroke. Trusted & Validity: All our courses are developed by a team of authorized U.S. board certified and licensed medical doctors.

Stress May Take Toll on Younger Women’s Hearts. Female heart disease patients under 50 were 4 times more likely than male peers to show effects, study found.

List of related literature:

Vitiello and Prinz [158] found that CNS degenerative disorders (e.g., dementia of the Alzheimer’s type) may cause polyphasic sleep–wake patterns, which constitute a significant problem among old nursing home residents.

“Sleep Disorders Medicine: Basic Science, Technical Considerations and Clinical Aspects” by Sudhansu Chokroverty
from Sleep Disorders Medicine: Basic Science, Technical Considerations and Clinical Aspects
by Sudhansu Chokroverty
Springer New York, 2017

However, in some studies no significant association has been observed in elderly persons30 or after adjustment for known risk factors.31 In women, short and long sleep is associated with a 40% increase of risk of coronary heart disease.31,32

“Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine: Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features” by Meir H. Kryger, Thomas Roth, William C. Dement
from Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine: Expert Consult Premium Edition Enhanced Online Features
by Meir H. Kryger, Thomas Roth, William C. Dement
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Progressively shorter sleep was associated with a 45 percent increased risk of developing and/or dying from coronary heart disease within seven to twenty-five years from the start of the study.

“Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams” by Matthew Walker
from Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams
by Matthew Walker
Scribner, 2017

Another study examined the relationship between short sleep duration and incident coronary calcification in healthy middle-aged adults.

“Murray & Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine E-Book” by Robert C Mason, John F. Murray, Jay A. Nadel, Michael B. Gotway, V.Courtney Broaddus, Joel D Ernst, Talmadge E King, Jr, Stephen C. Lazarus, Arthur Slutsky
from Murray & Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine E-Book
by Robert C Mason, John F. Murray, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Although older women report more sleep disturbances than older men; studies indicate that their sleep is less disturbed than that of men (Rediehs, Reis, & Creason, 1990 [Level I]).

“Evidence-Based Geriatric Nursing Protocols for Best Practice” by Elizabeth Capezuti, PhD, RN, FAAN, DeAnne Zwicker, DrNP, APRN, BC, Mathy Mezey, EdD, RN, FAAN, Terry T. Fulmer, PhD, RN, FAAN, Deanna Gray-Miceli, DSNSc, APRN, FAANP, Malvina Kluger
from Evidence-Based Geriatric Nursing Protocols for Best Practice
by Elizabeth Capezuti, PhD, RN, FAAN, DeAnne Zwicker, DrNP, APRN, BC, et. al.
Springer Publishing Company, 2007

Nonetheless, the relationship between short sleep and elevated BMI persists in both older men and women as demonstrated in a large study that used actigraphy to assess sleep duration in more than 6,000 adults aged 67–99 years [24].

“Sleep Deprivation and Disease: Effects on the Body, Brain and Behavior” by Matt T. Bianchi
from Sleep Deprivation and Disease: Effects on the Body, Brain and Behavior
by Matt T. Bianchi
Springer New York, 2013

Another study, carried out by the National Sleep Foundation in 2003, found that older men and women who slept poorly were more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

“Belly Fat Breakthrough: Understand What It Is and Lose It Fast” by Dr. Stephen Boutcher
from Belly Fat Breakthrough: Understand What It Is and Lose It Fast
by Dr. Stephen Boutcher
Gallery Books, 2014

Impaired sleep increases the risk of falls in older women: A prospective atigraphy study.

“Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem” by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, Committee on Sleep Medicine and Research, Bruce M. Altevogt, Harvey R. Colten
from Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem
by Institute of Medicine, Board on Health Sciences Policy, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2006

It is also reported that quality of sleep decreases with age, although many middle-aged clients will report a change in sleep quality, and sleep disorders may be diagnosed during this period of the life span (Crisp & Taylor 2009).

“Tabbner's Nursing Care E-Book: Theory and Practice” by Gabby Koutoukidis, Jodie Hughson, Gabrielle Koutoukidis, Kate Stainton
from Tabbner’s Nursing Care E-Book: Theory and Practice
by Gabby Koutoukidis, Jodie Hughson, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

These authors found that increasing age and ischemic heart disease were mostly associated with long-term sleep disturbances.

“Sleep Disorders Medicine E-Book: Basic Science, Technical Considerations, and Clinical Aspects” by Sudhansu Chokroverty
from Sleep Disorders Medicine E-Book: Basic Science, Technical Considerations, and Clinical Aspects
by Sudhansu Chokroverty
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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11 comments

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  • awsome and inspirational one. Thanks for sharing your experience… Am from Chennai, India, 50 years, I have a MB on LAD (Left Anterior Descening ) artery. I did lots of weight lifting I never posed any problem, especially, last 2 years I was having lots of confusions since my resting ECG, ECHO and Stress test e verything was normal, I was continue doing weight exercise, last year it was a nightmare and then dr’s did angio they found MB…. Now I discontinued the exercises but occasionally am getting little bit discomfort. Mine is little bit of muscle bridge but the report did not show the size of the MB

  • Thank you for creating/sharing this video related to so much of it from being told by doctors from one hospital after 1st SCAD I had not had a HA, (even though paramedics agreed I had & I also had every symptom described), to feeling alone (depressed/angry) friends/family did & do not truly realise the effect it has had on me mentally as Heather said it is always there in the back of your mind. (Heather I hope you and your remaining siblings are here for many many years to come xx)

  • Heather, you brave and wonderful person, think you for being open and honest so we can learn. Keep being strong, butbthat also means you can cry. Hugs from Australia

  • Congratulations Chris, Laura, Cristina and your entire team. This film is a triumph deserving of wide distribution (and lots of big flashy awards!) Bravo to all of you for this important work.

  • I keep fighting with my doctors over my cholesterol, from research and listening to top cardiologist around the world who we leaving the cholesterol train and taking the CAC train, most doctors do not even know what a CAC score is, even though it is the most important detection of heart attacks.. cholesterol actually has very little to do with heart attacks, its a huge money maker for big pharmaceutical companies, period.

  • This is happening to me my results come back clear but I’m struggling, squeezing pressure of my chest the pain is awful it spreads to my jaw and down to my arm feels like my doctors don’t take it seriously. I don’t know what to do it’s ruining my life.

  • I was diagnosed wtih MB in Standford by Dr. Dennis Lee. Nowaday, I am having a constant presssure especially right beneath the left collar bone and some time near the sternum area. I also have develop a light headache on the back of my left brain. Sometime, tingling sensation near the cheek area. Just wonder if you have seen some of these symptoms.

    Thanks
    -Paul

  • This is Reyna, Thank you all for your kind comments. It has been a long while since I was on this page. Raising awareness about Women’s Heart Health issues is important & necessary. It’s the #1 killer of women. I shared my story to give hope to people. Before surgery, I had debilitating 24/7 chest pain. Walking short distances was a struggle, I also experienced chest pain at rest and I got to the point where I couldn’t sleep. When I would finally sleep, I would be propped up in a pillow and the chest pains were so constant & severe that I often wondered if I’d wake up the next day. No exaggeration! Prior to this I was healthy, active and very busy with my family and career. Surgery saved my life. Dr. Tremmel is the best cardiologist! Her care was golden. I am also most grateful for my surgeon, Dr. Michael Fischbein. Stanford was the best medical facility I could have gone to.

  • Hello Reyna,
    You said in your video that your episodes are “mostly gone.” Are you still having pain?
    I’m contemplating a “procedure” but it I’m having second thoughts.
    What kind of lifestyle changes did you undergo prior to deciding on surgery. So far, my doctor has only offered surgery as an option. He wants to either cut the muscle or cut the artery and lay the artery on top of the muscle.
    What did your doctor do?

  • PLEASE CALL THIS SCAD Spontaneous Coronary Heart Dissection. I had chest pains on 3 occasions, the last when the ambulance officer suggested it was gastric reflux and did I really want to go to hospital. On arrival I was having a heart attack.
    I am a survivor of 21 years, and when diagnosed, the Prof informed me that I was the 4th patient he had ever seen.
    Symptoms still plague me at times, especially when I’m stressed. They are angina: pain from the chest going into the jaw, pain that wakes me in the middle of the night. My heart will go into flip flops, and strange feelings in my chest is now an indication that I must stop immediately, sometimes shortness of breath when climbing stairs etc.
    This has not stopped me from travelling to USA and Canada, looking after 11 acres solo since I lost my husband, and swimming 3 times a week clocking up 6 kms (3.7 miles) prior to Covid-19.
    There is now an Australian Facebook page purely for SCAD victims. There is a study of SCAD at Monash University which I’m part of now. After SCAD your will grieve for your loss, BUT there is life after it. I was warned I could still have another attack.

    When your feeling down, join a SCAD Facebook page, and tell your story as often as you can to young women and not to be deterred by someone not believing you and your body.

  • Reyna it is wonderful to hear and see that you took the extra steps to make this video in hopes of educating others. You are awesome!!!!