Evaluating Hormone Therapy

 

Study of Palbociclib after CDK & Endocrine Therapy in ER+/HER2Metastatic Breast Cancer

Video taken from the channel: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute


 

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Video taken from the channel: NASEM Health and Medicine Division


 

Revisiting Hormone Replacement Therapy

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Gender Health: Gender Affirming Hormone Therapy | UCLA Health

Video taken from the channel: UCLA Health


 

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21 Jan 2020 Your Health. Medically Reviewed. There are two big things that continue to cause confusion over the value of hormone therapy. One is the lingering effect of 2002 communications from Women’s Health Initiative study, which got some things wrong and overstated other things.

Evaluating Hormone Therapy There are two big things that continue to cause confusion over the value of hormone therapy. One is the lingering effect of 2002 communications from Women’s Health Initiative study, which got some things wrong and overstated other things. The evaluation might assess: Your gender identity and dysphoria The impact of your gender identity at work, school, home and social environments, including issues related to Mood or other mental health concerns Sexual health concerns Risk-taking behaviors, including substance use and use of. Hormone Evaluation and Replacement Therapy Neurohormones And The Brain. Communication between the brain and hormones goes both ways.

The brain sends out signals Thyroid: The Mood And Energy Regulator. The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located in your lower neck that Estrogen: The. As you age, certain hormones naturally fluctuate, decreasing body functions and sometimes causing uncomfortable symptoms.

While some hormones decrease, some increase and others stay the same. Monitoring your hormones is important if you are menopausal or are undergoing hormone replacement therapy or supplementation. The more serious health concerns for women undergoing hormone therapy (HT) include: Hormone therapy (HT) increases the risk of vein clots in the legs ( deep vein thrombosis ) and blood clots in the lungs (pulmonary embolus) by about 2 or 3 fold. After a complete medical evaluation, labs such as blood or saliva are done to diagnose a hormonal imbalance or as a follow up to treatment. We use only bioidentical hormonal therapy such as natural estrogen, progesterone and testosterone.

There have been hundreds of studies to prove the safety of bioidentical hormone therapy. Bioidentical is always the preferred choice because bioidentical hormones fit the hormone receptors in your body better than synthetics. The slight chemical differences in synthetic hormones mean they are not always absorbed properly, which can lead to side effects including cancer. Hormone therapy (HT) is prescribed during or after menopausal transition to replace the decline in estrogen and progesterone levels.

While some studies indicate that estrogen and progesterone depletion in postmenopausal women might carry a significant risk. Hormone therapy is most often used to treat breast and prostate cancers, where its role is well established through numerous clinical trials. Meanwhile, research is ongoing to study the potential use of hormonal therapy in treating other cancer types.

Hormone therapy can be given in a few way.

List of related literature:

For affirmed females, cross-sex hormone therapy with both estrogen and a second agent, either a GnRH analogue or an antiandrogen such as spironolactone (Guidelines for the primary and gender-affirming care of transgender and gender nonbinary people, 2016), will be used.

“Burns' Pediatric Primary Care E-Book” by Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks, Nancy Barber Starr, Margaret A. Brady, Nan M. Gaylord, Martha Driessnack, Karen Duderstadt
from Burns’ Pediatric Primary Care E-Book
by Dawn Lee Garzon Maaks, Nancy Barber Starr, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

An increasing number of physicians are recommending compounded natural hormone replacement therapy, including bio-identical estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, pregnenolone, and DHEA depending upon the needs of the individual.

“Cracking the Metabolic Code: The Nine Keys to Peak Health” by James B. Lavalle, Stacy Lundin Yale
from Cracking the Metabolic Code: The Nine Keys to Peak Health
by James B. Lavalle, Stacy Lundin Yale
Basic Health Publications, Incorporated, 2004

The primary care provider should also inquire about “herbal hormones”—phytoestrogens or androgen-like compounds sold as dietary supplements such as red clover, black cohosh, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

“The Fenway Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Health” by Harvey J. Makadon, MD, Kenneth H. Mayer, MD, Jennifer Potter, MD, Hilary Goldhammer, MS
from The Fenway Guide to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Health
by Harvey J. Makadon, MD, Kenneth H. Mayer, MD, et. al.
ACP Press,

If your practitioner isn’t well versed in hormone replacement therapy, they can direct you to someone who is.

“Boundless: Upgrade Your Brain, Optimize Your Body & Defy Aging” by Ben Greenfield
from Boundless: Upgrade Your Brain, Optimize Your Body & Defy Aging
by Ben Greenfield
Victory Belt Publishing, 2020

Hormone therapy encompasses treatment with estrogens, estrogens and progestins, combined estrogen and testosterone, testosterone alone, tibolone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S).

“Cancer and Sexual Health” by John P Mulhall, Luca Incrocci, Irwin Goldstein, Ray Rosen
from Cancer and Sexual Health
by John P Mulhall, Luca Incrocci, et. al.
Humana Press, 2011

Hormone therapy may be necessary to suppress original sex characteristics (i.e., with luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists, CPA, estrogens, and testosterone).

“Massachusetts General Hospital Handbook of General Hospital Psychiatry E-Book” by Theodore A. Stern, Gregory L. Fricchione, Jerrold F. Rosenbaum
from Massachusetts General Hospital Handbook of General Hospital Psychiatry E-Book
by Theodore A. Stern, Gregory L. Fricchione, Jerrold F. Rosenbaum
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

MtF Hormone Therapy The hormone regimen for MtF persons generally consists of estrogen and anti-androgen therapies (Table 9.1), with the goal of achieving estrogen levels of 100–200 pg/mL and testosterone levels <50 ng/dl.

“The Equal Curriculum: The Student and Educator Guide to LGBTQ Health” by James R. Lehman, Kristine Diaz, Henry Ng, Elizabeth M. Petty, Meena Thatikunta, Kristen Eckstrand
from The Equal Curriculum: The Student and Educator Guide to LGBTQ Health
by James R. Lehman, Kristine Diaz, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2019

Androgens are male hormones, and hormone therapy is also called androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or androgen suppression therapy (AST).

“Diseases and Disorders” by Marshall Cavendish Corporation
from Diseases and Disorders
by Marshall Cavendish Corporation
Marshall Cavendish, 2007

Gooren and Delemarre-van de Waal (1996) and CohenKettenis and van Goozen (1998) recommended that one option with gender-dysphoric adolescents is to prescribe puberty-blocking luteinizing hormone-release agonists (e.g., depot leuprolide or triptorelin) that make it easier to pass as the opposite sex.

“Rutter's Child and Adolescent Psychiatry” by Sir Michael J. Rutter, Sir Dorothy Bishop, Sir Daniel Pine, Sir Stephen Scott, Sir Jim S. Stevenson, Sir Eric A. Taylor, Sir Anita Thapar
from Rutter’s Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
by Sir Michael J. Rutter, Sir Dorothy Bishop, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

For postmenopausal women who have responded to several lines of hormonal therapy (SERMs, SERD, AIs, progestins, and perhaps androgens), estrogen therapy is a viable therapeutic alternative.

“Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8” by Waun Ki Hong, Robert C. Bast Jr, American Association for Cancer Research, William Hait, Donald W. Kufe, James F. Holland, Emil Frei Iii
from Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8
by Waun Ki Hong, Robert C. Bast Jr, et. al.
People’s Medical Publishing House, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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