Enhance the Smoking Age, Save Lives

 

Prevent Cancer by Starting Young: Raise Tobacco-Use Age to 21

Video taken from the channel: Texas Medical Association


 

Vainieri Huttle: Raising NJ’s tobacco age will save lives

Video taken from the channel: New Jersey Assembly Democrats


 

Raising Smoking Age, Public Health Funding Highlight Feb. Univ. of Health Briefing

Video taken from the channel: Texas Medical Association


 

Tobacco 21 – Up the Age

Video taken from the channel: American Lung Association


 

Tobacco 21: Reduce Youth Tobacco Use & Save Lives

Video taken from the channel: American Lung Association


 

Raise Smoking Age to 21, Cancer Center Physician Urges

Video taken from the channel: Texas Medical Association


 

Raising age to buy cigarettes may save lives

Video taken from the channel: KGUN9


“Raising the minimum smoking and vaping age to 21 will protect our kids and save lives.” The measure was supported by many tobacco and e-cigarette companies. Raising the age to buy tobacco nationwide will likely save lives By raising the age to buy tobacco products, the federal government is replicating what a. Nearly 90 percent of smokers started before age 18, so raising the legal age of purchase is meant to keep young people from trying it in the first place. Given that older peers often provide. Raise smoking, vaping age to 21 and save lives Originally published February 13, 2018 at 2:56 pm Updated February 13, 2018 at 3:07 pm Michael Osbun / Op-Art.

Ban tobacco sales until age 21. It’s a bipartisan way to reduce addiction and death. Raise the smoking age to 21 and save lives. There’s bipartisan support for a. THURSDAY, March 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) Raising the legal age to buy tobacco products from 18 to 21 would save hundreds of thousands of lives and substantially reduce the number of smokers in the United States, a new report finds.

Such a change would result in 249,000 fewer premature deaths amo. The best way to combat this crisis is to raise the legal smoking age to 21, as the Legislature is considering with SHB 1458. Attorney General Bob Ferguson requested the bill, and science supports. The report estimates that if the age to buy tobacco products was raised to 21 nationwide it would mean a 12 percent decrease in adult smokers and an estimated 223,000 fewer premature deaths.

These results include an saving an estimated 50,000 people from lung cancer deaths. The age 21 MLDA saves lives and improves health. 3. Fewer motor vehicle crashes.

States that increased the legal drinking age to 21 saw a 16% median decline in motor vehicle crashes. 6; Decreased drinking. After all states adopted an age 21 MLDA, drinking during the previous month among persons aged 18 to 20 years declined from 59% in 1985 to.

Raising the legal age to buy cigarettes to 21 would slash the smoking rate and save hundreds of thousands of lives by the end of the century, a.

List of related literature:

Levy, Cummings and Hyland (2000), using a simulation model, projected that even if 100 percent of smoking initiation by all youth under 18 years of age was prevented, it would still take decades to reduce smoking prevalence by 50 percent if cessation rates remained at current levels.

“Ending the Tobacco Problem: A Blueprint for the Nation” by Institute of Medicine, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, Committee on Reducing Tobacco Use: Strategies, Barriers, and Consequences, Robert B. Wallace, Kathleen Stratton, Richard J. Bonnie
from Ending the Tobacco Problem: A Blueprint for the Nation
by Institute of Medicine, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice, et. al.
National Academies Press, 2007

They do, however, find some evidence on the responsiveness to price among youths conditional on being a smoker.

“The Oxford Handbook of Health Economics” by Sherry Glied, Peter C. Smith
from The Oxford Handbook of Health Economics
by Sherry Glied, Peter C. Smith
OUP Oxford, 2011

Smoking substantially raises one’s risk of developing cancer, various cardiovascular diseases, and various respiratory diseases, and so it has the potential to reduce life expectancy by several years.

“The Demography and Epidemiology of Human Health and Aging” by Jacob S. Siegel, S. Jay Olshansky
from The Demography and Epidemiology of Human Health and Aging
by Jacob S. Siegel, S. Jay Olshansky
Springer Netherlands, 2011

Health promotion measures such as campaigns to stop maternal smoking are aimed at primary prevention.

“Adult Nursing Practice: Using Evidence in Care” by Ian Bullock, Jill Macleod Clark, Joanne Rycroft-Malone
from Adult Nursing Practice: Using Evidence in Care
by Ian Bullock, Jill Macleod Clark, Joanne Rycroft-Malone
OUP Oxford, 2012

If we can make even modest gains in our science and practice of smoking cessation, we can prevent millions of premature deaths and help preserve billions of years of life.

“The Handbook of Health Behavior Change, Third Edition” by Sally A. Shumaker, PhD, Judith K. Ockene, PhD, MEd, MA, Kristin A. Riekert, PhD
from The Handbook of Health Behavior Change, Third Edition
by Sally A. Shumaker, PhD, Judith K. Ockene, PhD, MEd, MA, Kristin A. Riekert, PhD
Springer Publishing Company, 2008

In fact, smok­ers who continue to smoke as older adults continue to increase their risk of morbidity and mortality.

“Health Promotion and Aging: Practical Applications for Health Professionals” by David Haber, PhD
from Health Promotion and Aging: Practical Applications for Health Professionals
by David Haber, PhD
Springer Publishing Company, 2013

Likewise, studies have documented a direct increase in perinatal morbidity mortality as smoking level increases.

“Women's Health Care in Advanced Practice Nursing” by Catherine Ingram Fogel, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Nancy Fugate Woods, PhD, RN, FAAN
from Women’s Health Care in Advanced Practice Nursing
by Catherine Ingram Fogel, PhD, RNC, FAAN, Nancy Fugate Woods, PhD, RN, FAAN
Springer Publishing Company, 2008

Therefore, it would save money for all of us as taxpayers if we could convince older persons to quit smoking and thus use fewer services paid for by Medicare, right?

“Research for Advanced Practice Nurses: From Evidence to Practice” by Magdalena A Mateo, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dr. Karin T Kirchhoff, PhD, RN
from Research for Advanced Practice Nurses: From Evidence to Practice
by Magdalena A Mateo, PhD, RN, FAAN, Dr. Karin T Kirchhoff, PhD, RN
Springer Publishing Company, 2009

Although this report demonstrates decreased prevalence (30% prevalence in 2002 and decreasing rates among youth aged 12 to 17 years),1 smoking continues to be the most important modifiable risk factor associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice” by Robert Resnik, MD, Robert K. Creasy, MD, Jay D. Iams, MD, Charles J. Lockwood, MD, MHCM, Thomas Moore, MD, Michael F Greene, MD
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice
by Robert Resnik, MD, Robert K. Creasy, MD, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2013

This resulted in 5.6 million years of potential life lost (CDC 2008).8 Moreover, smoking tends to be concentrated among the less well-off.

“Government Paternalism: Nanny State Or Helpful Friend?” by Julian Le Grand, Bill New
from Government Paternalism: Nanny State Or Helpful Friend?
by Julian Le Grand, Bill New
Princeton University Press, 2015

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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