Domestic Violence’s Overlooked Damage Concussion And Brain Injuries

 

Brain Trauma Studied In Domestic Abuse Victims

Video taken from the channel: Associated Press


 

Domestic Violence and Brain Injury by Peggy Reisher, MSW

Video taken from the channel: Harborview Injury Prevention Research Center ((HIPRC))


 

Supporting Survivors: Domestic Violence and Traumatic Brain Injury

Video taken from the channel: Brain Injury Alliance of Iowa


 

Beating brain injury in abuse victims

Video taken from the channel: TMJ4 News


 

Story: Domestic Violence’s Overlooked Damage: Concussion And Brain Injury

Video taken from the channel: Awesome person


 

Brain Injury Common in Domestic Violence

Video taken from the channel: Ohio State News


 

Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) Caused by Intimate Partner Violence

Video taken from the channel: MassGeneralHospital


Women are at high risk for getting concussions from domestic violence. A neurologist and a social worker have paired up to try to get women the specific medical help and counseling that they need. Domestic violence is estimated to affect more than 10 million people each year. Head and neck injuries are some of the most common issues, and Zieman is uncovering how frequently traumatic brain. Hundreds of survivors of domestic violence have come through the doors of neurologist Glynnis Zieman’s Phoenix clinic in the past three years. ” Domestic Violence’s Overlooked Damage: Concussion And Brain Injury | KBIA.

“Unlike athletes, they do not have the luxury, if you will, of recovering after an injury before they are injured again.” Domestic violence is estimated to affect 10 million people each year. Head and neck injuries are some of the most common issues, and Zieman is uncovering how frequently traumatic brain injury is a part of the picture. Women are at high risk for getting concussions from domestic violence. A neurologist and a social worker have paired up to try to get women the specific medical help and counseling that they need.

Home America Domestic Violence’s Overlooked Damage: Concussion And Brain Injury. Domestic Violence’s Overlooked Damage: Concussion And Brain Injury. June 1, 2018.

Share on Facebook. It’s a health crisis cloaked in secrecy and shame, one that Zieman is uncovering through her work at the Barrow Concussion and Brain Injury Center. Domestic Violence’s Overlooked Damage: Concussion And Brain Injury Women are at high risk for getting concussions from domestic violence. A neurologist and a social worker have paired up to try to. But survivors of domestic violence may be suffering largely in silence.

About 70 percent of people seen in the emergency room for such abuse are never identified as survivors of domestic violence. It’s a health crisis cloaked in secrecy and shame, one that Zieman is uncovering through her work at the Barrow Concussion and Brain Injury Center. Survivors of domestic violence may be suffering largely in silence from the same traumatic brain injuries, memory loss and PTSD seen in veterans and athletes. (EP).

Domestic Violence’s Overlooked Damage: Concussion And Brain Injury It’s a health crisis cloaked in secrecy and shame, one that Zieman is uncovering through her work at the Barrow Concussion and Brain Injury Center in Phoenix. She runs a first-of-its-kind program dedicated to treating traumatic brain injury for survivors of domestic violence.

List of related literature:

But what the results did suggest is that domestic violence may be an important etiological factor for neurological disorder, such as structural brain disorders.

“In an Abusive State: How Neoliberalism Appropriated the Feminist Movement against Sexual Violence” by Kristin Bumiller
from In an Abusive State: How Neoliberalism Appropriated the Feminist Movement against Sexual Violence
by Kristin Bumiller
Duke University Press, 2008

Assault, including child and spousal abuse, accidents in the home or workplace, and sports injuries also contribute to traumatic brain injury.

“Ophthalmology” by Myron Yanoff, Jay S. Duker, James J. Augsburger
from Ophthalmology
by Myron Yanoff, Jay S. Duker, James J. Augsburger
Mosby Elsevier, 2009

In: Rosenthal M, Griffith ER, Kreutzer JS and Pentland B. (eds) Rehabiltiation of the Adult and Child with Traumatic Brain Injury, Philadelphia: F.A. Davis, 1999:199—215.

“Brain Injury Medicine: Principles and Practice” by Nathan Zasler, Douglas Katz, MD, Ross Zafonte, DO
from Brain Injury Medicine: Principles and Practice
by Nathan Zasler, Douglas Katz, MD, Ross Zafonte, DO
Springer Publishing Company, 2007

Additionally, brain injury may be missed if facial bruising that indicates deeper injury is not recognized.

“Elder Abuse: Research, Practice and Policy” by XinQi Dong
from Elder Abuse: Research, Practice and Policy
by XinQi Dong
Springer International Publishing, 2017

Ponsford J, Willmott C, Rothwell A, et al: Factors influencing outcome following mild traumatic brain injury in adults, J Int Neuropsychol Soc 6:568-579, 2000.

“Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation E-Book” by Randall L. Braddom
from Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation E-Book
by Randall L. Braddom
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

It’s possible that more research will find a link between domestic violence and migraine.

“The Migraine Brain: Your Breakthrough Guide to Fewer Headaches, Better Health” by Carolyn Bernstein, Elaine McArdle
from The Migraine Brain: Your Breakthrough Guide to Fewer Headaches, Better Health
by Carolyn Bernstein, Elaine McArdle
Atria Books, 2009

The clinician should suspect domestic violence if an individual has sustained injuries and does not offer a plausible explanation for them.

“Essential Skills in Family Therapy, Second Edition: From the First Interview to Termination” by JoEllen Patterson, Lee Williams, Todd M. Edwards, Claudia Grauf-Grounds, Douglas H. Sprenkle, Larry Chamow
from Essential Skills in Family Therapy, Second Edition: From the First Interview to Termination
by JoEllen Patterson, Lee Williams, et. al.
Guilford Publications, 2009

While there are no reliable estimates of the prevalence of even extreme passive trauma, most domestic violence experts estimate it occurs at least twice as frequently as active abuse.

“I Don't Want to Talk About It: Overcoming the Secret Legacy of Male Depression” by Terrence Real
from I Don’t Want to Talk About It: Overcoming the Secret Legacy of Male Depression
by Terrence Real
Scribner, 1999

Noting that the Bureau of Justice study and the CDC study may have underreported the incidence of domestic violence, Young says, “Even if we assume that four out of five such cases are missed, domestic violence would still be ranked far behind falls (27% of injuries) and automobile accidents (13%)” (p. 105).

“The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism Is Harming Our Young Men” by Christina Hoff Sommers
from The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism Is Harming Our Young Men
by Christina Hoff Sommers
Simon & Schuster, 2001

Common head injuries include skull wounds (Scalplacerations and skull fracture) and brain injuries (concussion, contusion, intracranial bleeding), typically Caused by direct blows, Car Crashes, falls from heights, assault, and Sports injuries.

“Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured” by Andrew N. Pollak, Bruce D. Browner, Carol L. Gupton, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
from Emergency Care and Transportation of the Sick and Injured
by Andrew N. Pollak, Bruce D. Browner, et. al.
Jones and Bartlett, 2002

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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4 comments

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  • I absolutely needed to see this today. I’m always so frustrated by my memory loss and inability to pay attention and problem solve!! It’s not all day every day but frequent enough… I agree more research please..

  • Does it seem to be a lot of misinformation and judgement around people AND animals living/or lived traumatic experiences? To be more specific, multiple and/or prolonged exposure to trauma. In some circles, this means to assume the recipient is, “playing” the victim or that the giver acts alone. I’m inclined to understand this attitude toward abuse/the abused; a stranglehold on the means and recovery of both partners and their surviving dependents. Head trauma in particular needs special attention and care. There is a LOT going on in our brains and its network. Visualizing what is going on in there is not typically a simple diagnostic process. There’s still a mentality of those who discount what isn’t seen on the surface. Any thoughts on this?

  • I’m glad I found this video. I was hit in the head 1-2 times per week for about three years. I used to have a great memory. Now I’m almost 30 and have to write everything or I’ll forget. I forget so many things now and always wondered if it was because of how many times I was hit in the head. I wonder what the domestic violence survivor and football players have in common with brain injuries.

  • I suffered a broken nose and orbital blowout in a single punch for not requesting permission to visit my mother.

    The next day, my partner finally decided to take me to the Emergency room, drilling me all along the way regarding the ‘soft ball accident” story he made up. He stared me down during the preliminary examination, as he was allowed to remain in the room. The surgeon noted that the injury was typical of bar fights; and the the technician was shocked to see all the damage to my skull; and possibly my brain when he did the x-rays and tried to persuade me to tell the truth, which I feared to do.

    Years later… my medical records to not reflect the truth of this incident; nor the numerous BLOWS to the head (in two of which instances, a telephone and bottle were shattered on the top of y head) causing undiagnosed, untreated blackouts, concussion etc. -which were not reported until recently when I braved the courage to admit to the world that “this “licensed but now ‘inactive’ lawyer” was weak enough to be a victim” Because my medical records do not accurately reflect my circumstances and the extent of my injuries and their cause… my last physician basically laughed at me… asserting that though “disabled” by SSA standards for 20 years now… the long terms affects that I complain of ‘are probably nothing!”

    Still I wait for acknowledgement and proper treatment, feeling hopeless until I watched a series of videos, today, including yours.

    Thank you for demonstrating that somebody out there understands and cares. You have a great understanding which must be shared. My first abuser beat me up on the morning of the Bar Exam. #FightingHopelessnessInNashville! #HELP!