Diabetes and Cardiac Arrest Risk What is the Connection

 

The Diabetes-Cardiovascular Connection

Video taken from the channel: Alliance for Patient Access


 

Heart disease & the connection to type 1 diabetes Dr. Gourgari’s interview w/ WUSA9

Video taken from the channel: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital


 

What is the connection between diabetes and heart disease?

Video taken from the channel: UnityPoint Health Cedar Rapids


 

Heart Disease and Diabetes

Video taken from the channel: Diabetes.co.uk


 

Diabetics at higher risk for heart disease

Video taken from the channel: AdvocateHealthCare


 

What Is The Connection Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease? Dr. Kahlon

Video taken from the channel: Banner Health


 

Diabetes & Your Heart

Video taken from the channel: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


Yes, there is a connection between diabetes and heart attack and stroke risk. And this connection is something you need to be aware of and discuss with your health care provider. About 68 percent of people age 65 and older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease, and 16 percent die of stroke. In fact, adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults. The risk of heart disease increases the longer you have diabetes.

Monitoring blood sugar is an important part of properly managing diabetes. Check levels with a. Diabetes increases your risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), diabetic cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. CHD is usually caused by a buildup of cholesterol on the walls of the arteries that supply your heart with blood. With time, this narrows or clogs your.

In some people with type 1 diabetes, blood glucose swings that can cause repeated injury to the heart can, in turn, cause the body’s own immune system to attack the heart, much as it attacks the. having diabetes significantly increases your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. In the intervening years, scientists have learned more about how the two deadly diseases interact. But the magnitude of the problem has expanded as well. Currently, two-thirds of people with diabetes eventually die of heart disease or stroke.

In general, the risk of heart disease death and stroke are more than twice as high in people with diabetes. While all people with diabetes have an increased chance of developing heart disease, the. Having diabetes means that you are more likely to develop heart disease and have a greater chance of a heart attack or a stroke. People with diabetes are also more likely to have certain conditions, or risk factors, that increase the chances of having heart disease or stroke, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke.

That’s because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure (hypertension). People with diabetes are twice as likely to have heart disease as their peers without diabetes. Also, when you have diabetes for a number of years you are more at risk for heart disease. Diabetes is definitely a risk factor for heart disease.

People with diabetes develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. Heart disease that leads to heart attack or stroke is the leading cause of.

List of related literature:

Diabetes—In 2001, the Physicians’ Health Study reported that the presence of diabetes increases the risk of a heart attack every bit as much as a history of previous coronary artery disease.

“The Harvard Medical School Guide to Men's Health” by Harvey Bruce Simon, Harvard Medical School
from The Harvard Medical School Guide to Men’s Health
by Harvey Bruce Simon, Harvard Medical School
Free Press, 2002

As a symptom of underlying heart disease, heart failure is closely associated with the major risk factors for coronary heart disease: smoking, high cholesterol levels, hypertension (persistent high blood pressure), diabetes and abnormal blood sugar levels, and obesity.

“Consumer Health USA” by Alan M. Rees
from Consumer Health USA
by Alan M. Rees
Oryx Press, 1997

Insulin resistance leads to type 2 diabetes and induces atherosclerosis, which leads to coronary artery disease.

“Clayton's Basic Pharmacology for Nurses” by Michelle Willihnganz, Samuel L Gurevitz, Bruce D Clayton
from Clayton’s Basic Pharmacology for Nurses
by Michelle Willihnganz, Samuel L Gurevitz, Bruce D Clayton
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Multiple studies show that insulin resistance doubles the risk of heart attack as early as fifteen years before diabetes is diagnosed, along with risk of stroke.

“There Is a Cure for Diabetes: The Tree of Life 21-Day+ Program” by Gabriel Cousens, David Rainoshek
from There Is a Cure for Diabetes: The Tree of Life 21-Day+ Program
by Gabriel Cousens, David Rainoshek
North Atlantic Books, 2007

The latter study clearly indicated that the relation between diabetes and CHF was not only caused by traditional risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), but also involved other mechanisms [4].

“Textbook of Diabetes” by Richard I. G. Holt, Clive Cockram, Allan Flyvbjerg, Barry J. Goldstein
from Textbook of Diabetes
by Richard I. G. Holt, Clive Cockram, et. al.
Wiley, 2011

Diabetes increases the risk for coronary artery disease with angina (chest pain) and atherosclerosis (narrowing of the arteries).

“Kinn's The Medical Assistant E-Book: An Applied Learning Approach” by Brigitte Niedzwiecki, Julie Pepper, P. Ann Weaver
from Kinn’s The Medical Assistant E-Book: An Applied Learning Approach
by Brigitte Niedzwiecki, Julie Pepper, P. Ann Weaver
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Although coronary artery disease remains a significant risk factor for heart failure, it has been shown that the relationship between diabetes and heart failure is independent of the presence of atherosclerosis.

“Netter's Cardiology E-Book” by George Stouffer, Marschall S. Runge, Cam Patterson, Joseph S. Rossi
from Netter’s Cardiology E-Book
by George Stouffer, Marschall S. Runge, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

When hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia are all present, the risk for atherosclerotic coronary artery disease is increased almost 20-fold, suggesting that these factors interact in a synergistic manner to increase the risk of developing atherosclerosis.

“Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology E-Book” by John E. Hall
from Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology E-Book
by John E. Hall
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

A common complication of diabetes is the accelerated atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries, which interferes with normal blood flow and increases the risk of heart attacks and strokes [165].

“Principles of Gender-specific Medicine” by Marianne J. Legato, John P. Bilezikian
from Principles of Gender-specific Medicine
by Marianne J. Legato, John P. Bilezikian
Elsevier Academic Press, 2004

Diabetes and heart failure are strongly linked, and not just through comorbidities such as hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease because diabetes alone may cause left ventricular dysfunction.

“Cardiology E-Book” by Michael H. Crawford, John P. DiMarco, Walter J. Paulus
from Cardiology E-Book
by Michael H. Crawford, John P. DiMarco, Walter J. Paulus
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2009

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • Heart Disease an Diabetes is what my Father had,He died young an these two Disease run in the family.Thank you for sharing this.I appreciate the video about this.
    Edith Schmidt N.J.