Delays in Diagnosis Hurt Ladies Who Have Cardiovascular Disease

 

Heart Disease Risks: What Women Need to Know

Video taken from the channel: BaptistHealthSF


 

Women and Heart Disease Misdiagnosis

Video taken from the channel: Johnson & Johnson


 

Women & Heart Disease

Video taken from the channel: ScottsdaleHealthcare


 

Ask UNMC: Diagnosing heart attacks in women

Video taken from the channel: UNMCEDU


 

Heart Attacks in Women

Video taken from the channel: Ohio State Wexner Medical Center


 

Heart Disease in Women: What You Should Know

Video taken from the channel: SingHealth


 

How to Diagnose Heart Disease in Women

Video taken from the channel: Cleveland Clinic


HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) Women with heart disease aren’t treated as aggressively in the operating room as men are, and delays in diagnosis may be the reason. Delays in Diagnosis Hurt Women Who Have Heart Disease.

THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 Women with heart disease aren’t treated as aggressively in the operating room as men are, and delays in diagnosis may be the reason why, a new Canadian study suggests. “It appears that by the time women present with heart disease, they are slightly older and may be facing more comorbidities such as obesity and diabetes. Delays in Diagnosis Hurt Women Who Have Heart Disease Privacy & Trust Info THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) Women with heart disease aren’t treated as aggressively in the operating room as men are, and delays in diagnosis may be the reason why, a new Canadian study suggests.

Women with heart disease aren’t treated as aggressively in the operating room as men are, and delays in diagnosis may be the reason why, a new Canadian study suggests. “It appears that by the time women present with heart disease, they are slightly older and may be facing more comorbidities such as obesity and diabetes,” explained study senior author Dr. Fraser Ruben. Delays in Diagnosis Hurt Women Who Have Heart Disease Women with heart disease aren’t treated as aggressively in the operating room as men are, and delays in diagnosis may be the reason why, a new Canadian study suggests. Delays in Diagnosis Hurt Women Who Have Heart Disease. Study found they were less likely to receive surgeries involving multiple artery grafts. Please note: This article was published more than one year ago.

The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And “More information” links may no longer work. Coronavirus (COVID-19) THURSDAY, Sept. 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Women with heart disease aren’t treated as aggressively in the operating room as men are, and delays in diagnosis may be the reason why, a new Canadian study suggests.

Delays in Diagnosis Hurt Women Who Have Heart Disease Women with heart disease aren’t treated as aggressively in the operating room as men are, and delays in diagnosis may be the reason why, a new Canadian study suggests. Women with heart disease aren’t treated as aggressively in the operating room as men are, and delays in diagnosis may be the reason why. About 1 in 16 women age 20 and older (6.2%) have coronary heart disease, the most common type of heart disease: 4. About 1 in 16 white women (6.1%), black women (6.5%), and Hispanic women (6%) About 1 in 30 Asian women (3.2%) What are the symptoms of heart disease?

Although some women have no symptoms, others may have 5.

List of related literature:

Seventeen million Americans have known coronary artery disease (CAD); however, in more than half of everyone else in whom CAD will be diagnosed, the diagnosis will follow a bad outcome—namely, a myocardial infarction (MI) or sudden cardiac death.

“Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care E-Book: Expert Consult” by John L. Pfenninger, Grant C. Fowler
from Pfenninger and Fowler’s Procedures for Primary Care E-Book: Expert Consult
by John L. Pfenninger, Grant C. Fowler
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Doctors often attribute symptoms of heart disease to other factors in female patients, and women often don’t believe that they’re having an MI and delay getting emergency treatment, so they account for almost half of all MI deaths.

“Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016 E-Book: 5 Books in 1” by Fred F. Ferri
from Ferri’s Clinical Advisor 2016 E-Book: 5 Books in 1
by Fred F. Ferri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Seventeen million Americans have known coronary artery disease (CAD); however, in more than half of those diagnosed with CAD, the diagnosis will follow a bad outcome—namely, a myocardial infarction (MI) or sudden cardiac death.

“Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care E-Book” by Grant C. Fowler
from Pfenninger and Fowler’s Procedures for Primary Care E-Book
by Grant C. Fowler
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

Heart disease in women may not be diagnosed correctly by the conventional tests, which often are indeterminate.

“The Demography and Epidemiology of Human Health and Aging” by Jacob S. Siegel, S. Jay Olshansky
from The Demography and Epidemiology of Human Health and Aging
by Jacob S. Siegel, S. Jay Olshansky
Springer Netherlands, 2011

More specifically, consider the postmenopausal woman with a primary family history of heart disease who presents with shoulder pain that occurs 3 to 4 minutes after starting an activity and is accompanied by unexplained perspiration.

“Differential Diagnosis for Physical TherapistsE-Book” by Catherine C. Goodman, John Heick, Rolando T. Lazaro
from Differential Diagnosis for Physical TherapistsE-Book
by Catherine C. Goodman, John Heick, Rolando T. Lazaro
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

In most medical centers, women with symptoms of heart disease such as chest pain are considerably less likely than men with similar symptoms to receive tests such as a stress electrocardiogram (ECG), which determines how well the heart performs during exercise.

“The New Harvard Guide to Women's Health” by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, M.D., Terra Diane Ziporyn, Alvin & Nancy Baird Library Fund, Harvard University. Press
from The New Harvard Guide to Women’s Health
by Karen J. Carlson, Stephanie A. Eisenstat, et. al.
Harvard University Press, 2004

Thus, stress may distract physicians from diagnosing heart disease in women.

“Psychology of Gender: Fifth Edition” by Vicki S. Helgeson
from Psychology of Gender: Fifth Edition
by Vicki S. Helgeson
Taylor & Francis, 2016

The scenario is repeated on three consecutive weekends, and though the woman has never had an abnormal EKG, an astute nurse tests her heart enzymes to look for a more serious heart ailment.

“Heal Your Mind” by Mona Lisa Schulz, M.D./Ph.D., Louise Hay
from Heal Your Mind
by Mona Lisa Schulz, M.D./Ph.D., Louise Hay
Hay House, 2016

Patients with atherosclerotic risk factors who report chest pain before syncope or effort syncope or have an abnormal resting ECG suggestive of ischemic disease are prime candidates for stress testing.

“Primary Care Medicine: Office Evaluation and Management of the Adult Patient” by Allan H. Goroll, Albert G. Mulley
from Primary Care Medicine: Office Evaluation and Management of the Adult Patient
by Allan H. Goroll, Albert G. Mulley
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Women present with coronary heart disease (CHD) events on average 10 years later than men, but have a steady rise in the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) or “heart attacks” as they reach and go through menopause.

“Encyclopedia of Women's Health” by Sana Loue, Martha Sajatovic
from Encyclopedia of Women’s Health
by Sana Loue, Martha Sajatovic
Springer US, 2004

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • I’m scared to death that I have something wrong with my heart. I’m 24 and I have been having weird symptoms like when I sleep I get woken up every time by my heart beating so hard and pretty fast. I do have anxiety about it but I’m quitting. I’m just worried about my heart cause I also have a weird popping beat when I lay on my side. If anybody knows what’s wrong with me please help. I don’t know if I have strong anxiety or I have a heart problem. My lips are perfectly colored, I’m not swollen and I have no symptoms of heart failure or attack. I live a very stressful life and I’m worried it cause me to get a heart problem.

  • Can fatigue go so far as to falling asleep instantly during the day, having great difficulty waking up, at night sleeping so deep that it takes great effort to wake up, and that allarm clocks cause shock and heart palpitations? Could a heart cleft that has never closed since before birth be the cause of all the symptoms?

  • My heart feels sharpness sometime and sometime i can feel it pounding weirdly, either its bcause i was drinking coffee twice a day for 3 days, not enough sleep, or i got it from family history heart disease. But it’s hard for me to explain to my family and ask to do check up now since the Corona virus outbreak.

    -hoping its just bcause of the coffee, not bcause heart disease or corona virus

  • I have the symptoms of heart disease and my mom doesn’t believe me. My sister has heart problems but the doctor told her it was caffeine. But mine is different and I can’t sleep at all… I have literally all the symptoms right now

  • Cheers for the Video! Apologies for butting in, I would love your opinion. Have you tried Trentvorty Irreplaceable Doctor Theorem (erm, check it on google should be there)? It is a smashing one of a kind product for curing heart disease without the normal expense. Ive heard some incredible things about it and my mate after many years got excellent results with it.

  • I have shortness of breath, my feet are nearly always cold(maybe something with blood circulation) and a feeling of anxiety/“terror”in my chest, I also time to time fell my heart fluttering (I heard that’s normal but with all the other things along with it I don’t know) and my granddad died of heart problems at around age 50. Should I be considered and go to the doctor? I’m age 13 female.

  • Excellent video content! Apologies for chiming in, I would love your initial thoughts. Have you tried Trentvorty Irreplaceable Doctor Theorem (probably on Google)? It is a great exclusive product for curing heart disease without the headache. Ive heard some super things about it and my cousin after a lifetime of fighting got amazing success with it.

  • Lovely video content! Forgive me for chiming in, I would appreciate your thoughts. Have you heard about Trentvorty Irreplaceable Doctor Theorem (just google it)? It is a good one of a kind guide for curing heart disease minus the hard work. Ive heard some interesting things about it and my work buddy at last got cool success with it.

  • If your having symptoms call 911 if u wait you could die. She says to go see your primary Dr. If your having symptoms…. by the time you get an appointment you could be dead.

  • Why should the physician have all the discretion? What if the patient has done her homework and wants the cardiac ct for her CAC score? Why shouldn’t the patient’s opinions and desires be accounted for? She pays the bills ultimately. It’s her body and her health. What’s with this paternalistic ideology that doctors know best despite what informed patients have learned and that they would like a say in testing and treatment?