Could This Prevent Newborn Mix-ups in the Hospital

 

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Hospital apologises for baby mix-up

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How A Baby Mix-Up Could Have Been Prevented

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A new study found incorporating THIS information could help prevent newborn mix-ups. MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) Using more specific names for newborns may reduce hospital mix-ups by roughly a third, a new study suggests. Hospitals all follow some kind of protocol designed to prevent mix-ups and keep both parents and newborns safe. Most units follow a system that uses identification bands that match the mother and the newborn, as well as one support partner. Hospital officials said that Abbott Northwestern Hospital gives matching wristbands to every newborn and his mother to prevent mix-ups. “While hospital procedures require staff to match codes on the infant’s and mother’s identification bands in order to prevent incidents like this, it appears these procedures were not followed in this case,” the hospital said.

An easy way to prevent dangerous newborn mixups When hospital patients receive medication, monitoring or other treatment meant for someone else, the results can be harmful or even fatal for either patient the one who received the treatment in error as well as the one who did not get the treatment that he or she needed. An easy way to prevent dangerous newborn mixups. Jul 7, 2020 | Articles.

When hospital patients receive medication, monitoring or other treatment meant for someone else, the results can be harmful or even fatal for either patient – the one who received the treatment in error as well as the one who did not get the treatment that he or she needed. Newborns can be. Identification Techniques for Preventing Infant Mix-Ups.

Infant mix-ups in hospitals could happen any day. Steve Kaufer from Inter/Action Associates, a Las Vegas security consulting firm, estimates that 1 out of every 1,000 infants is switched in hospitals. The firm interviewed more than 400 maternity ward employees across the U.S. for a study on baby. The newborn footprints, along with a mother’s fingerprints, became part of the hospital’s records as a requirement by states to help prevent mix-ups in hospital nurseries. “What they found in the 1980s is less than 5 percent of the newborn footprints could be used for identification,” Yarnell said. “So the law changed.”.

Officials at St. Joseph Hospital, which sent a newborn home with the wrong parents last Sunday, disclosed Friday three other incidents of infants being mixed up, including one in which a. All hospitals have identification systems to prevent mix-ups. I also believe current practice in most hospitals is to keep newborns in the same room as the mother most of the time instead of in a nursery. There are fewer transfers back and forth—so fewer opportunities for mix-ups.

256 views · Answer requested by. Hospital: In one incident, newborn was breast-fed by wrong mother. None was incorrectly discharged.

3 Other Baby Mix-Ups Disclosed at St. Joseph however, didn’t prevent two mix-ups.

List of related literature:

Many institutions also use a color-coded badge to identify which health care workers are allowed to transport the baby from the mother’s room to the newborn nursery and back.

“Comprehensive Neonatal Nursing Care: Fifth Edition” by Carole Kenner, PhD, NNP, FAAN, Judy Wright Lott, DSN, RN, BC-NNP, FAAN
from Comprehensive Neonatal Nursing Care: Fifth Edition
by Carole Kenner, PhD, NNP, FAAN, Judy Wright Lott, DSN, RN, BC-NNP, FAAN
Springer Publishing Company, 2013

Hospital routines should minimize unnecessary separation of newborns from their parents.

“Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant” by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
from Fanaroff and Martin’s Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant
by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Infections, in particular sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis, can generally be prevented through good antenatal care, hygienic care during birth, care of the cord after birth and early exclusive breastfeeding.

“Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book” by Brian A. Magowan, Philip Owen, Andrew Thomson
from Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology E-Book
by Brian A. Magowan, Philip Owen, Andrew Thomson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Having a hospitalized baby is always stressful for parents, and there are additional challenges when the baby breastfeeds.

“Counseling the Nursing Mother” by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
from Counseling the Nursing Mother
by Judith Lauwers, Anna Swisher
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2015

Issues such as the amount of skin-to-skin contact, wrapping the baby, rooming in (where baby stays with you instead of going to the nursery), as well as the use of vitamin K, silver nitrate, and the hepatitis B vaccine, are all things that may come up with the pediatrician or with your OB or midwife.

“Birth Without Fear: The Judgment-Free Guide to Taking Charge of Your Pregnancy, Birth, and Postpartum” by January Harshe
from Birth Without Fear: The Judgment-Free Guide to Taking Charge of Your Pregnancy, Birth, and Postpartum
by January Harshe
Hachette Books, 2019

Nurses and parents can prevent infant abductions by always being alert for suspicious behavior and stopping anyone who might be taking a baby.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

Mothers are also advised not to leave the infant alone in the crib while they shower or use the bathroom; rather, they should ask a health care worker to watch the infant if a family member is not present in the room.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Different hospitals will have different policies on providing milk for newborns.

“Your No Guilt Pregnancy Plan: A revolutionary guide to pregnancy, birth and the weeks that follow” by Rebecca Schiller
from Your No Guilt Pregnancy Plan: A revolutionary guide to pregnancy, birth and the weeks that follow
by Rebecca Schiller
Penguin Books Limited, 2018

If at all possible, the nurses should clean the child as much as possible and partially cover the child with a colorful blanket so that tubes and incisions are not all immediately visible.

“Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child E-Book” by Mary Fran Hazinski
from Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child E-Book
by Mary Fran Hazinski
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

* Not remove the identification bands on the newborn until he is discharged from the hospital and to alert the nurses if an identification band falls off or becomes illegible for any reason.

“Broadribb's Introductory Pediatric Nursing” by Nancy T. Hatfield
from Broadribb’s Introductory Pediatric Nursing
by Nancy T. Hatfield
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2007

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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