Could Infant Common colds, Other Infections Raise Your Body Risk

 

The Genetic Basis of Type 1 Diabetes | Stephen Rich, PhD

Video taken from the channel: Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH)


 

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Autoimmunity to hypocretin and molecular mimicry to flu in type 1 narcolepsy Emmanuel Mignot

Video taken from the channel: The Physiological Society


 

Infancy gene signature helps predict type 1 diabetes progression

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TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) Colds and other infections in the first six months of life may boost the odds of a child developing type 1 diabetes. TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) Colds and other infections in the first six months of life may boost the odds of a child developing type 1 diabetes by nearly 20 percent, new research suggests. The suspicion that infections play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes isn’t new.

Experts have long suspected that viral infections may trigger the disease. Could Infant Colds, Other Infections Raise Type 1 Diabetes Risk? Colds and other infections in the first six months of life may boost the odds of a child developing type 1 diabetes by nearly 20 percent, new research suggests. (HealthDay)— Colds and other infections in the first six months of life may boost the odds of a child developing type 1 diabetes by nearly 20 percent, new research suggests. TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) Colds and other infections in the first six months of life may boost the odds of a child developing type 1 diabetes by nearly 20 percent, new research suggests.

The suspicion that infections play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Colds and other infections in the first six months of life may boost the odds of a child developing type 1 diabetes by nearly 20 percent, new research suggests. The suspicion that infections play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes isn’t new. Experts have long suspected that viral infections may trigger the disease.

Feb. 3, 2011 A common cold virus could trigger type 1 diabetes in at-risk children, a new research review suggests. The finding could help explain a dramatic rise in diabetes incidence.

When the data for viral infections was correlated with islet antibodies, the researchers found that enterovirus infections were detected more often in children who formed islet antibodies—in other words, those children who went on to develop type 1 diabetes. Signs of Diabetes in Toddlers, Babies & Infants. Type 1 diabetes is a serious autoimmune disease in which the pancreas stops producing insulin—which is essential to getting energy from food.

It strikes suddenly—and has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle. Colds and other infections in the first six months of life may boost the odds of a child developing type 1 diabetes by nearly 20 percent, new research suggests.

List of related literature:

Recent studies have suggested, however, that infants who have been breastfed may have a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus in later life and this observation could be linked with immune mechanisms known to be associated with this condition.

“Oxford Textbook of Medicine” by D. A. Warrell, Timothy M. Cox, John D. Firth
from Oxford Textbook of Medicine
by D. A. Warrell, Timothy M. Cox, John D. Firth
Oxford University Press, 2005

More than two-thirds of infected infants have no symptoms apparent at birth, but sequelae may develop years later, such as diabetes mellitus.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Lisa Keenan-Lindsay, David Wilson, Cheryl A. Sams
from Maternal Child Nursing Care in Canada E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2016

Already, it is known that risk for serious infections of various kinds increases significantly with poor diabetes control, but appreciation of more complex relationships between infection and type 2 diabetes is now emerging as well.

“Encyclopedia of Epidemiology” by Sarah Boslaugh, Louise-Anne McNutt
from Encyclopedia of Epidemiology
by Sarah Boslaugh, Louise-Anne McNutt
SAGE Publications, 2008

Both CMV infection and post-LT diabetes are factors that are potentially modifiable.

“Sherlock's Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System” by James S. Dooley, Anna S. F. Lok, Jenny Heathcote
from Sherlock’s Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System
by James S. Dooley, Anna S. F. Lok, Jenny Heathcote
Wiley, 2011

Children with chronic heart or lung conditions, diabetes, chronic renal disease, or immune deficiency are at higher risk than other children for more severe influenza infection.

“Maternity and Pediatric Nursing” by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
from Maternity and Pediatric Nursing
by Susan Scott Ricci, Terri Kyle
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009

Childhood diabetes has been shown to have epidemic dynamics, which are probably related to viral infection such as Coxsackie, mumps, or rubella.

“The Lighthouse Handbook on Vision Impairment and Vision Rehabilitation: Two-volume Set” by Barbara Silverstone, Mary Ann Lang, Bruce Rosenthal, Eleanor E. Faye
from The Lighthouse Handbook on Vision Impairment and Vision Rehabilitation: Two-volume Set
by Barbara Silverstone, Mary Ann Lang, et. al.
Oxford University Press, USA, 2000

There is interest in a possible link between Type 1 diabetes and B1 infection.

“Communicable Disease Control and Health Protection Handbook” by Jeremy Hawker, Norman Begg, Iain Blair, Ralf Reintjes, Julius Weinberg, Karl Ekdahl
from Communicable Disease Control and Health Protection Handbook
by Jeremy Hawker, Norman Begg, et. al.
Wiley, 2012

Enterovirus infection as a risk factor for beta-cell autoimmunity in a prospectively observed birth cohort: the Finnish Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study.

“Williams Textbook of Endocrinology E-Book” by Shlomo Melmed, Kenneth S. Polonsky, P. Reed Larsen, Henry M. Kronenberg
from Williams Textbook of Endocrinology E-Book
by Shlomo Melmed, Kenneth S. Polonsky, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Children with type 1 diabetes usually present with a several day history of typical symptoms, such as frequent urination, excessive thirst, and weight loss, which appear when about 80% of the pancreatic β cells are already destroyed.

“Regenerative Medicine Applications in Organ Transplantation” by Giuseppe Orlando
from Regenerative Medicine Applications in Organ Transplantation
by Giuseppe Orlando
Elsevier Science, 2013

While some viral infections may increase the risk of type 1 diabetes, infectious agents may also play a protective role against diabetes.

“Principles of Diabetes Mellitus” by Leonid Poretsky
from Principles of Diabetes Mellitus
by Leonid Poretsky
Springer US, 2010

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • 12.5 percent of Type 1 Diabetics have Thyroid issues…. so let me guess…. if i divide t1 diabetics male to female i can assume

    20-25% of t1d females have autoimmune thyroid issues and….

    5% of T1d males have autoimmune thyroid issues

    only cause it’s more common in females….

    and it doesn’t bother if T1 diabetics have to end up taking thyroid pills for the rest of their life.

    because…….

    they’re already taking insulin for the rest of their lives…..