Coping With Your Body

 

Living with type 1 diabetes, a day in the life of Tom

Video taken from the channel: IntDiabetesFed


 

Emily MichelLiving with Type 1 Diabetes

Video taken from the channel: Dayton Children’s Hospital


 

Playing Sports: Teens Living With Type 1 Diabetes

Video taken from the channel: T1 Everyday Magic


 

Living Alone with Type 1 Diabetes

Video taken from the channel: JDRF


 

THINGS I WISH EVERYONE KNEW ABOUT TYPE 1 DIABETES // living with a chronic disease

Video taken from the channel: Michelle Lord


 

Living with Type 1 diabetes | Erin’s Story | Diabetes UK

Video taken from the channel: Diabetes UK


 

Health: Living With: Type 1 Diabetes | The New York Times

Video taken from the channel: The New York Times


When you’re living with Type 1 diabetes, you stop producing insulin. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream and doesn’t get to your cells, a condition known as high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. If you didn’t know, a little background: According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, in type 1 diabetes, which usually is diagnosed in children and young. It’s having to put on a fake smile every time you have to explain to someone that type 1 and type 2 diabetes are NOT the same thing. It’s not being able to go a single work out without stressing if you’re going to go too low, drop too fast or go high.

Living with something like this requires a great amount of motivation, positive mindset and a healthy living. Struggling with diabetes or any disease in fact is not easy and it breaks you at many. I have had type 1 diabetes for 50 years.

Fifty years. At the time I was diagnosed, way back in 1968, I was told that I shouldn’t expect to live past the age of 35 years. Now, as I approach 58 with all my toes intact, I welcome the opportunity to look back at the decades, the changing technologies, and the many clinicians who have crossed my patient path. It is not uncommon for people with type 1 diabetes to have reservations about living alone.

Usually the main concerns for people with type 1 diabetes living on their own are over what happens if short term complications, such as severe hypos or ketoacidosis, occur. The following guide has been put together to help ease these concerns. Dr. Tony O’Sullivan, a GP living with Type 1 says “It’s a very personal challenge for the person with diabetes, as well as a technical challenge for the healthcare professional. Living With Diabetes Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism the way our bodies use digested food for growth and energy.

There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational. Brian Herrick, JDRF’s communications manager, has lived with Type 1 diabetes since he was 3 years old and says he hopes to one day not have to explain to people​ what Type 1. Anyone can develop Type 1 diabetes. No, it isn’t a lifestyle disease, and no, it’s not infectious. One day, your pancreas can simply just stop producing insulin.

It can hit you at any age; it can affect both sexes and any race. Diabetes does not discriminate. In Australia, Type 1 diabetes accounts for around 10% of all diagnosed diabetic cases.

List of related literature:

About 40% of the patients who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes will require insulin therapy and will benefit from tight control of their blood glucose levels.

“Clinical Engineering Handbook” by Joseph Dyro
from Clinical Engineering Handbook
by Joseph Dyro
Elsevier Science, 2004

But every person living with diabetes – and anyone living with someone living with diabetes – will find Gretchen Becker’s wonderful book an invaluable complement to those other sources of information.

“The First Year: Type 2 Diabetes: A Patient-Expert Guide for the Newly Diagnosed” by Gretchen Becker
from The First Year: Type 2 Diabetes: A Patient-Expert Guide for the Newly Diagnosed
by Gretchen Becker
Little, Brown Book Group, 2012

Most people with diabetes have type 2.

“Essential Concepts for Healthy Living” by Sandra Alters, Wendy Schiff
from Essential Concepts for Healthy Living
by Sandra Alters, Wendy Schiff
Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2005

Twenty years from the onset of diabetes, over 90% of people with type 1, and over 60% of people with type 2, will have diabetic retinopathy.

“Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics E-Book” by Roger Walker, Cate Whittlesea
from Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics E-Book
by Roger Walker, Cate Whittlesea
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

It’s not just type 1 and type 2 anymore; many other forms of diabetes have been designated: gestational diabetes, LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood), MODY (Maturity Onset Diabetes of Youth), neonatal diabetes, and secondary diabetes.

“Think Like a Pancreas: A Practical Guide to Managing Diabetes with Insulin-Completely Revised and Updated” by Gary Scheiner
from Think Like a Pancreas: A Practical Guide to Managing Diabetes with Insulin-Completely Revised and Updated
by Gary Scheiner
Hachette Books, 2012

Even when type 2 diabetes is untreated, there is usually enough insulin present to control lipid mobilization and prevent ketoacidosis when the patient is otherwise well.

“Irwin and Rippe's Intensive Care Medicine” by Richard S. Irwin, James M. Rippe
from Irwin and Rippe’s Intensive Care Medicine
by Richard S. Irwin, James M. Rippe
Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2008

In the absence of proteinuria, Danish patients with type 1 diabetes have a nearly normal life expectancy.337 The FinnDiane study and the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study extended these findings to show a graded association between the severity of kidney disease and mortality.

“Brenner and Rector's The Kidney E-Book” by Alan S. L. Yu, Glenn M. Chertow, Valerie Luyckx, Philip A. Marsden, Karl Skorecki, Maarten W. Taal
from Brenner and Rector’s The Kidney E-Book
by Alan S. L. Yu, Glenn M. Chertow, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

I hope this book will explain to anyone with type 2 diabetes how it may be possible to return to full health.

“Life Without Diabetes: The definitive guide to understanding and reversing your type 2 diabetes” by Professor Roy Taylor
from Life Without Diabetes: The definitive guide to understanding and reversing your type 2 diabetes
by Professor Roy Taylor
Short Books, 2019

In the past, few type 2 diabetic patients had a chance to live long enough to develop nephropathy.38 Currently, with better treatment of hypertension and of coronary heart disease, an increasing proportion of type 2 diabetic patients survive and thus are exposed to the risk for development of DN and ESRD.

“Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology E-Book” by Richard J. Johnson, John Feehally, Jurgen Floege
from Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology E-Book
by Richard J. Johnson, John Feehally, Jurgen Floege
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

While it is true that most of those with type 2 can stay alive without injecting insulin, many patients who suffer from type 2, or so-called NIDDM, do inject insulin to preserve their health.

“Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide to Achieving Normal Blood Sugars” by Richard K. Bernstein
from Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide to Achieving Normal Blood Sugars
by Richard K. Bernstein
Little, Brown, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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6 comments

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  • This is Wilford Brimley. I have sugar Diabeetis. Don’t forget to check your sugars as often as you should and use your testin’ supplies. 

  • getting ready to go out and having to make sure you have your diabetes supplies “bag” and it is very important for education about the pancreas and what it does. I’ve been asked a few times by people “what is a pancreas and what does it do? ” if people at least new about the anatomy of the pancreas and how it works.

  • I’m t1 diabetic and I also have asthma. I can’t follow my boxing dreams and I’m often suicidal. I’m 16 and I don’t see myself living to 25. I imagine suicide will happen and I can’t stop it. My life’s a mess.

  • I was diagnosed with type 1 yesterday the same day my dad was diagnosed with coeliac (which is really bizarre)…but looking at how well Dominique is managing hers, makes me feel a bit better.

  • Good on ya Dominique! Well done with managing your disease! I hope the treatment you are testing works. Congrats on being tough and willing to be confident with your treatment! Keep up the good fight!

  • It’s really fun to draw on your omnipod. I change my pod and then I let my friend draw on it. She’s a really good artist so it’s amazing and different every time. It makes having to wearing the pump a little fun. It’s like wearing a canvas