Coping With Bladder Cancer

 

Bladder Cancer Treatment Options

Video taken from the channel: Mayo Clinic


 

Bladder Cancer Survivor Plays On: A Musician’s Life After Treatment

Video taken from the channel: Michigan Medicine


 

Diagnosed with bladder cancer at 42

Video taken from the channel: CBS News


 

Conversations: Healthy Eating After Bladder Cancer Treatment

Video taken from the channel: Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network


 

Bladder Cancer | John’s Story

Video taken from the channel: Johns Hopkins Medicine


 

Living the Best Life Possible with Metastatic Bladder Cancer

Video taken from the channel: American Association for Cancer Research


 

Living with bladder cancer: Dave’s story

Video taken from the channel: Roche


Living With Bladder Cancer Terminal Cancer and Covid-19 Posted on March 24, 2020 by SM Dougan Terminal cancer and Covid-19 are a terrifying combination. Living as a Bladder Cancer Survivor Follow-up care. After treatment, your doctors will still want to watch you closely. People who’ve had bladder cancer Ask your doctor for a survivorship care plan.

Talk. Living with a stoma (urostomy) Get tips on how to cope practically and emotionally after a urostomy, bladder reconstruction or surgery to remove early bladder cancer. Looking after your urostomy After having a urostomy, you pass urine. Find helpful information about how to live well for those living with bladder cancer from Cancer.com, a cancer information resource hub. Other bladder cancer patient experiences may help you in your own bladder cancer journey.

Learn more about a real bladder cancer. Active Living with Bladder Cancer Staying Active with Bladder Cancer. Staying Active is Easier than You Think.

Staying active is important, but it is even more important when facing bladder cancer. Staying or becoming active during bladder cancer. From diagnosis through treatment and beyond, living with bladder cancer can be challenging for patients, as well as their loved ones and caregivers. Fortunately, there are many strategies and resources available that can help patients and their loved ones live with bladder cancer.

For bladder cancer, if the cancer has spread to the regional lymph nodes, the 5-year survival rate is 36.3 percent. If it has spread to a more distant site, the 5-year survival rate is 4.6. SOURCES: Mayo Clinic: “Bladder cancer,” “Bladder removal surgery,” “Adapting to life after colostomy, ileostomy or urostomy.” Cancer Research UK: “Living with bladder reconstruction.”. Bladder cancer, like other cancers, is measured in stages.The stages describe how far your cancer has spread.

This key piece of information will help you and your doctor choose the best. Wherever you are on the patient pathway—having just been diagnosed with bladder cancer, embarking on treatment for it, or undergoing monitoring for recurrence—you are likely experiencing some anxiety and sense of unease. To give you some peace of mind, here are tips to guide you through your bladder cancer journey.

List of related literature:

Fewer than 15% of patients with invasive bladder cancer survive 2 years if left untreated and, for patients with localized disease who are surgical candidates, most deaths from bladder cancer occur within 3 years after cystectomy.”

“Textbook of Bladder Cancer” by Seth P. Lerner, Mark Schoenberg, Cora Sternberg
from Textbook of Bladder Cancer
by Seth P. Lerner, Mark Schoenberg, Cora Sternberg
Taylor & Francis, 2006

Overall, 5­yr survival for patients with muscle­invasive bladder cancer is 50–70%.

“Davidson's Essentials of Medicine” by J. Alastair Innes, BSc PhD FRCP Ed
from Davidson’s Essentials of Medicine
by J. Alastair Innes, BSc PhD FRCP Ed
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

If approximately 70% of patients with newly diagnosed bladder cancer will present with superficial bladder tumors, most of them will eventually have recurrent cancer, and 10 to 20% will progress to muscleinvasive or metastatic disease.

“MEDINFO 2007: Proceedings of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics” by K.A. Kuhn, J.R. Warren, T.-Y. Leong
from MEDINFO 2007: Proceedings of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics
by K.A. Kuhn, J.R. Warren, T.-Y. Leong
IOS Press, 2007

Family members also share prognosis of bladder cancer, either good or poor survival.80–82 First degree relatives of patients with bladder cancer have a twofold increased risk of bladder cancer but high-risk bladder cancer families are extremely rare.

“Oxford Textbook of Urological Surgery” by Freddie C. Hamdy, Ian Eardley
from Oxford Textbook of Urological Surgery
by Freddie C. Hamdy, Ian Eardley
Oxford University Press, 2017

However, prognosis for patients with invasive bladder cancer is more highly correlated with cancer severity than with patient age (44.45).

“Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.” by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
from Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.
by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, 2010

The treatment and prognosis of bladder cancer depend upon its stage, grade, and the risk that the cancer will recur.

“The Basics of Cancer Immunotherapy” by Haidong Dong, Svetomir N. Markovic
from The Basics of Cancer Immunotherapy
by Haidong Dong, Svetomir N. Markovic
Springer International Publishing, 2018

Once the cancer spreads beyond the transitional cell layer, it is highly invasive and can spread beyond the bladder.

“Medical-Surgical Nursing: Patient-Centered Collaborative Care, Single Volume” by Donna D. Ignatavicius, M. Linda Workman, PhD, RN, FAAN
from Medical-Surgical Nursing: Patient-Centered Collaborative Care, Single Volume
by Donna D. Ignatavicius, M. Linda Workman, PhD, RN, FAAN
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

In general, the patient with bladder cancer can be told that one-third of affected individuals can be expected to do extremely well and enjoy long-term survival.

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, W. E. Jacott, M. G. Rosen, Robert B. Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, et. al.
Springer New York, 2013

Patients with non-muscle-invasive, lowgrade papillary bladder cancer are at low risk of progression to invasive disease, although the risk of recurrence may be as high as 70-80%.

“Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8” by Waun Ki Hong, Robert C. Bast Jr, American Association for Cancer Research, William Hait, Donald W. Kufe, James F. Holland, Emil Frei Iii
from Holland-Frei Cancer Medicine 8
by Waun Ki Hong, Robert C. Bast Jr, et. al.
People’s Medical Publishing House, 2010

In general, the patient with bladder cancer can be told that one-third of affected individuals can be expected to do extremely well and enjoy a long-term survival.

“Family Medicine: Principles and Practice” by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, W. E. Jacott, M. G. Rosen, Robert B. Taylor
from Family Medicine: Principles and Practice
by J. L. Buckingham, E. P. Donatelle, et. al.
Springer New York, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • My mum had to undergo Cystectomy removal of bladder with the stoma bag. She is also a CKD patient wherein only one dysfunctional kidney is the filter. Kudos to her strength and spirit, it’s been 7 months now and she’s in the pink of health. Touchwood. God bless her abundantly

  • My mo has a urinary bladder cancer stage 4 and we dont know what to do im scared every time i see her in pain i hoping she can overcome it������