Connecticut Toddler Latest U.S. Situation of ‘Superbug’

 

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The latest case, a 2-year-old Connecticut girl, was diagnosed in June after she returned from a trip to the Caribbean, said senior researcher Maroya Spalding Walters, a CDC epidemiologist. The latest case, a 2-year-old Connecticut girl, was diagnosed in June after she returned from a trip to the Caribbean, said senior researcher Maroya Spalding Walters, a CDC epidemiologist. “The girl had an illness that caused diarrhea, which began in mid-June while she was traveling overseas. A fourth U.S. person has been diagnosed with bacteria resistant to a last resort antibiotic, but researchers are expressing relief that so far these superbug precursors.

All of the patients had E. coli with a gene called mcr-1, which makes the bacteria resistant to the antibiotic colistin, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The latest case, a 2-year-old Connecticut girl, was diagnosed in June after she returned from a trip to the Caribbean, said senior researcher Maroya Spalding Walters, a CDC epidemiologist. The latest case, a 2-year-old Connecticut girl, was diagnosed in June after she returned from a trip to the Caribbean, said senior researcher Maroya Spalding Walters, a CDC epidemiologist. “The girl had an illness that caused diarrhea, which began in mid-June while she was traveling overseas. On Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said another superbug popped up in a 2-year-old girl in Connecticut.

She got sick in June and was found to have a strain of E. coli bacteria with the antibiotic-resistance gene known as mcr-1, making her the fourth human case in the United States identified so far. On Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the superbug popped up in a 2-year-old girl in Connecticut. She got sick in June and was found to have a strain of E. Newest superbug found in a Connecticut toddler. LS.

By Lena H any of the four U.S. human cases, Kallen said. in May 2015 from a hospital patient in New York after researchers. On Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said another superbug popped up in a 2-year-old girl in Connecticut. She got sick in June and was found to have a strain of E. Newest Superbug Found In A Connecticut Toddler.

By any of the four U.S. human cases, Kallen said. in May 2015 from a hospital patient in New.

List of related literature:

One case report involved a 2-month-old infant in Japan (who also had evidence of penicillin-resistant pneumococcus) [4], and the second case report involved 3and 4-month-old infants in the United States, one of whom had extension of the abscess into the mediastinum accompanied by venous thrombosis [5].

“Infectious Diseases of the Fetus and Newborn E-Book” by Jack S. Remington, Christopher B. Wilson, Victor Nizet, Jerome O. Klein, Yvonne Maldonado
from Infectious Diseases of the Fetus and Newborn E-Book
by Jack S. Remington, Christopher B. Wilson, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

These investigators found that 8 of 9 infants with systemic infection, but only 1 of 60 uninfected infants, had elevated serum TNFα.

“Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant” by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
from Fanaroff and Martin’s Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine: Diseases of the Fetus and Infant
by Richard J. Martin, Avroy A. Fanaroff, Michele C. Walsh
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Neurodevelopment and cognition in children after enterovirus 71 infection.

“Health Care for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities across the Lifespan” by I. Leslie Rubin, Joav Merrick, Donald E. Greydanus, Dilip R. Patel
from Health Care for People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities across the Lifespan
by I. Leslie Rubin, Joav Merrick, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2016

This child most likely had acquired T. gondii infection recently and the blow to the head was coincidental and unrelated to the onset of symptoms.

“Toxoplasmosis of Animals and Humans” by J. P. Dubey
from Toxoplasmosis of Animals and Humans
by J. P. Dubey
CRC Press, 2016

Overwhelming infections in the immunocompromised child constitute an emergency situation.

“Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book” by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
from Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children E-Book
by Marilyn J. Hockenberry, David Wilson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Antiviral therapy has reduced themortality to 55%ininfants with disseminated infection and to 15% in infants with encephalitis, and it has increased the proportion of survivors who function normally at 1 year of age (108).

“Infectious Diseases” by Sherwood L. Gorbach, John G. Bartlett, Neil R. Blacklow
from Infectious Diseases
by Sherwood L. Gorbach, John G. Bartlett, Neil R. Blacklow
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2004

I now suspect that this child was infected with a Group B Coxsackie virus and had aseptic meningitis with pleurodynia and myalgia.

“Polio” by Thomas M. Daniel, Frederick C. Robbins
from Polio
by Thomas M. Daniel, Frederick C. Robbins
University of Rochester Press, 1999

Tuberculosis treatment should be started immediately and the child’s antiretroviral therapy altered as necessary.

“Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases E-Book” by Sarah S. Long, Larry K. Pickering, Charles G. Prober
from Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases E-Book
by Sarah S. Long, Larry K. Pickering, Charles G. Prober
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2012

Such a baby, though infected, usually escapes clinical disease.

“Ananthanarayan and Paniker's Textbook of Microbiology” by R. Ananthanarayan, C.K. Jayaram Paniker
from Ananthanarayan and Paniker’s Textbook of Microbiology
by R. Ananthanarayan, C.K. Jayaram Paniker
Orient Longman, 2006

Infants with gonococcal ophthalmia should be hospitalized and evaluated for disseminated infection.

“Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book” by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, Thomas Moore, Michael F Greene, Joshua Copel, Robert M Silver
from Creasy and Resnik’s Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice E-Book
by Robert Resnik, Charles J. Lockwood, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • The last drug resistant diseases they CREATED were completely vulnerable to plain old TUMERIC. Turmeric almost instantly kills MERSA and all the others. But instead of using turmeric, they prescribe MORE dangerous drugs because there is no money in prescribing turmeric.

  • There are also superbugs coming across the borders due to people coming from places like China and Bangladesh, with their overcrowding probs. Not surprisingly found most commonly in states/cities of “sanctuary”.