Children in Physically Active Classrooms Perform Better Educationally

 

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According to a new consensus statement published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, children perform better academically when they have access to physical activity at school. A new review suggests that children who are active in sports or physical activity perform better at school. Researchers say physical activity may enhance children. In fact, many studies are now showing that children who are physically active also perform better in the classroom.

Over the past decade, the positives of physical education are helping students and teachers to feel good about taking a break from the usual classroom environment and get moving. The Challenge: Children who are physically active and fit tend to perform better in the classroom, but many schools allow little to no time for students to be active. Make an impact: Policies that support daily physical education and regular activity breaks during the school day can help increase physical activity, improve academic performance and improve classroom behavior among students. Students who get extra physical activity may pay more attention in school and do better in subjects like reading and math, a research review suggests. The study team analyzed data from 26.

More Physical Activity May Mean Improved Student Scores There is myriad research that proves that students need adequate amounts of physical activity throughout the school day—not only does it prevent obesity and obesity-related issues, but students also perform better academically. “And that translates into the classroom, where children who are physically active may adhere better to classroom rules and get along better with teachers and classmates. So academic performance may. A physically active individual is more likely to be happy and healthy, which makes them a better student in the classroom.

They often feel proud and happy about themselves and are good towards their fellow students. 5. Physical education makes an individual flexible and happ. The Elementary School Journal) found that students who are inattentive, withdrawn, and disengaged in the classroom have poorer academic performance when compared to engaged students. Teachers rated the classroom behavior of 1,013 fourth-grade.

A recent report from the Institute of Medicine asserts that “children who are more active show greater attention, have faster cognitive processing speed, and perform better on standardized academic.

List of related literature:

This study was designed to decrease cardiovascular risk factors in children through interventions implemented in the classroom, during physical education class, and in the cafeteria via the school food service.

“Nutrition in Public Health: A Handbook for Developing Programs and Services” by Sari Edelstein, Barbara Bruemmer
from Nutrition in Public Health: A Handbook for Developing Programs and Services
by Sari Edelstein, Barbara Bruemmer
Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2006

Plenty of activities that students perform in physical education class take place at moderate intensity levels.

“Introduction to Teaching Physical Education: Principles and Strategies” by Jane M. Shimon
from Introduction to Teaching Physical Education: Principles and Strategies
by Jane M. Shimon
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2019

Hence, multiple recess periods in open spaces of shorter duration may be better than longer recess periods for enhancing young children’s moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

“Handbook of Early Childhood Special Education” by Brian Reichow, Brian A. Boyd, Erin E. Barton, Samuel L. Odom
from Handbook of Early Childhood Special Education
by Brian Reichow, Brian A. Boyd, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2016

Regular breaks that include physical activity actually increase children’s attention to more desk-bound, cognitively demanding tasks (Pellegrini & Bjorklund, 1997; Pellegrini & Bohn, 2005).

“Child Development and Education” by Teresa M. McDevitt, Jeanne Ellis Ormrod, Glenn Cupit, Margaret Chandler, Valarie Aloa
from Child Development and Education
by Teresa M. McDevitt, Jeanne Ellis Ormrod, et. al.
Pearson Higher Education AU, 2012

The more involved that families become, the greater the chance is that students will incorporate regular physical activity into their lives.

“Physical Education for Lifelong Fitness: The Physical Best Teacher's Guide” by Physical Best (Program), Suzan F. Ayers, National Association for Sport and Physical Education, Mary Jo Sariscsany
from Physical Education for Lifelong Fitness: The Physical Best Teacher’s Guide
by Physical Best (Program), Suzan F. Ayers, et. al.
Human Kinetics, 2011

A study by Chen et al. [11] indicated that school children who had greater frequency of participation in PE lessons were more likely to spend greater time in MVPA, even after school hours.

“Enhancing Health and Sports Performance by Design: Proceedings of the 2019 Movement, Health & Exercise (MoHE) and International Sports Science Conference (ISSC)” by Mohd Hasnun Arif Hassan, Ahmad Munir Che Muhamed, Nur Fahriza Mohd Ali, Denise Koh Choon Lian, Kok Lian Yee, Nik Shanita Safii, Sarina Md Yusof, Nor Farah Mohamad Fauzi
from Enhancing Health and Sports Performance by Design: Proceedings of the 2019 Movement, Health & Exercise (MoHE) and International Sports Science Conference (ISSC)
by Mohd Hasnun Arif Hassan, Ahmad Munir Che Muhamed, et. al.
Springer Singapore, 2020

Likewise, activities such as physical education, lunch, recess, music, morning circle, and other less structured activities may increase the chances that a student with ASD will engage in a difficult behavior unless these activities are structured in some fashion.

“Learners on the Autism Spectrum: Preparing Highly Qualified Educators” by Kari Dunn Buron, Pamela J. Wolfberg, Carol Gray
from Learners on the Autism Spectrum: Preparing Highly Qualified Educators
by Kari Dunn Buron, Pamela J. Wolfberg, Carol Gray
Autism Asperger Publishing Company, 2008

Early in the year, physical education lessons can teach students activities they can engage in at recess.

“Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children” by Robert P. Pangrazi, Aaron Beighle
from Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children
by Robert P. Pangrazi, Aaron Beighle
Human Kinetics, 2019

In the old-model physical education, children in the lower grades are likely to be playing games and relays.

“The Ultimate Athlete” by George Leonard
from The Ultimate Athlete
by George Leonard
North Atlantic Books, 2000

The challenge of ensuring that children from these disadvantaged groups develop physical literacy will only be met when parents and caregivers demand that schools, preschools, day care centers, community recreation centers, and sport organizations make physical literacy a priority.

“Long-Term Athlete Development” by Istvan Balyi, Richard Way, Colin Higgs
from Long-Term Athlete Development
by Istvan Balyi, Richard Way, Colin Higgs
Human Kinetics, Incorporated, 2013

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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