Caregiving Needs Be used as Finish of Existence Gets near

 

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Reliance On Caregivers Doubles Near End Of Life

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Caregiving needs double as end of life nears (HealthDay)—Reliance on caregivers doubles as people near death, and half of those caregivers—typically unpaid family members—report having no time for. TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) Reliance on caregivers doubles as people near death, and half of those caregivers typically unpaid family members report having no time for themselves, a new study indicates.

The research used a nationally representative sample of about 2,400 older adults in the United States. Caregiving Needs Double as End of Life Nears. TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 Reliance on caregivers doubles as people near death, and half of those caregivers typically unpaid family members report having no time for themselves, a new study indicates.

The research used a nationally representative sample of about 2,400 older adults in the United States. Those near the end of life received 61 hours of help per week compared to 35 hours of help per week for older adults who weren’t at the end of life. More than one-third of the end-of-life caregivers reported physical difficulty related to their duties. Just over half reported having no time for themselves. These figures were 21 percent and 40 percent, respectively, for.

Those near the end of life received 61 hours of help per week compared to 35 hours of help per week for older adults who weren’t at the end of life. More than one-third of the end-of-life caregivers reported physical difficulty related to their duties. Just over half reported having no time for themselves. These figures were 21 percent and 40 percent, respectively, for. Caregiving Needs Double as End of Life Nears Reliance on caregivers doubles as people near death, and half of those caregivers—typically unpaid family members—report having no time for themselves, a new study indicates.

Caregiving Needs Double as End of Life Nears. August 24, 2017 | News & Information. Reliance on caregivers doubles as people near death, and half of those who are tasked with caregiving — typically unpaid family members — report having no time for themselves, a new study indicates.

Caregiving Needs Double as End of Life Nears. Reliance on caregivers doubles as people near death, and half of those caregivers—typically unpaid family members—report having no time for themselves, a new study indicates. The research used a nationally representative sample of about 2,400 older adults in the United States.

TUESDAY, Aug. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) Reliance on caregivers doubles as people near death, and half of those caregivers typically unpaid family members report having no time for themselves, a new study indicates. The research used a nationally representative sample of about 2,400 older adults in the United States. Visit the post for more.

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List of related literature:

Although caregiving provides opportunities for adult children and elderly parents to grow closer, the positive psychological outcomes for both are often overshadowed by the demands of too little time to serve the needs of everyone—including the caretaker herself.

“Gender Roles: A Sociological Perspective” by Linda L. Lindsey
from Gender Roles: A Sociological Perspective
by Linda L. Lindsey
Taylor & Francis, 2015

Yet caregiving has been a constant in human experience.

“The Psychology of Working: A New Perspective for Career Development, Counseling, and Public Policy” by David Blustein
from The Psychology of Working: A New Perspective for Career Development, Counseling, and Public Policy
by David Blustein
Taylor & Francis, 2013

More and more families are faced with long-distance caregiving.

“Gerontologic Nursing E-Book” by Sue E. Meiner, Jennifer J. Yeager
from Gerontologic Nursing E-Book
by Sue E. Meiner, Jennifer J. Yeager
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

So caregiving often begins with a crisis and decisions about caregiving are usually made by default.

“Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities” by Jill Yamasaki, Patricia Geist-Martin, Barbara F. Sharf
from Storied Health and Illness: Communicating Personal, Cultural, and Political Complexities
by Jill Yamasaki, Patricia Geist-Martin, Barbara F. Sharf
Waveland Press, 2016

Caregiving requires time, energy, skills, and emotional investments.

“Managing Diversity in Today's Workplace: Strategies for Employees and Employers [4 volumes]” by Michele A. Paludi
from Managing Diversity in Today’s Workplace: Strategies for Employees and Employers [4 volumes]
by Michele A. Paludi
ABC-CLIO, 2012

Caregiving can include a variety of services (Figure 7.2).

“What Retirees Want: A Holistic View of Life's Third Age” by Ken Dychtwald, Robert Morison
from What Retirees Want: A Holistic View of Life’s Third Age
by Ken Dychtwald, Robert Morison
Wiley, 2020

Nonetheless, a system that marginalizes caregivers hurts anyone with caregiving responsibilities that includes not only parents but children.

“Unbending Gender: Why Family and Work Conflict and What To Do About It” by Joan Williams
from Unbending Gender: Why Family and Work Conflict and What To Do About It
by Joan Williams
Oxford University Press, 2001

There is further evidence to suggest that when caregiving needs are most intensive or prolonged it is mothers who will be on the front line.

“Encyclopedia of Disability” by Gary L Albrecht, Sharon L. Snyder, Thomson Gale (Firm), Jerome Bickenbach, David T. Mitchell, Sage Publications, Walton O. Schalick, III
from Encyclopedia of Disability
by Gary L Albrecht, Sharon L. Snyder, et. al.
SAGE Publications, 2006

There is also a significant need for respite care to prevent situations where they are overcome by the stress of caregiving.

“Community Health and Wellness: Principles of primary health care” by Jill Clendon, Ailsa Munns
from Community Health and Wellness: Principles of primary health care
by Jill Clendon, Ailsa Munns
Elsevier Health Sciences APAC, 2018

Thus, for migrant lone mothers a double imperative seems to apply: they can either work full time if the income from work is sufficient to pay for external (expensive) care and sustain the household’s costs, or they can live on social assistance if their prospects of finding gainful employment are gloomy.

“Lone Parenthood in the Life Course” by Laura Bernardi, Dimitri Mortelmans
from Lone Parenthood in the Life Course
by Laura Bernardi, Dimitri Mortelmans
Springer International Publishing, 2017

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
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  • My Nana has Alzheimer’s and it’s getting worse, she can’t remember our names, gets us confused, confuses time and good goodness she repeats and repeats over and over and over. In addition to that she’s complaining about everything as she is repeating, drives me crazy but I remain respectful and just go with it. If I say well no it was this not that, she then will start yelling at me and I am very sick of it! She has changed so much I don’t even know her anymore (tears) I tell myself everyday she can’t help it, it helps for most of the year. Yesterday I finally asked her why does it always have to be a battle with you, always the back n forth? I never speak to her like that I just could not take it anymore, I feel terrible especially since I slammed the door as I left her home. I never speak to her like that and in all the years with my grandmother I have never slammed a door at her home. I just wanna cry today.

  • I have never considered myself to be a victim….but I am am A VICTIM. pretty close to suicidal….talk to my therapist regularly.

  • The scope of my question is so narrow, it might qualify as tangential. Regarding constipation and poor dentition, since I puree my dad’s food in a blender, does it still have all the fiber? If I blenderize vegetables, for example, does he get the benefit of the fiber?

  • My Dad was diagnosed with late stage Alzheimer’s disease last November, and was just places in hospice care as of yesterday. The Memory Care facility where he’s staying says they’re saddened by how quickly the disease process has been progressing. It’s been particularly hard during the pandemic lockdowns. Thank you for this video! It helps me understand what my Dad has been going through, and what to expect as the hospice process begins. It’s an extremely heartbreaking disease.

  • It’s important to know about Delirium, as well. Each episode of Delirium
    can cause the Dementia to progress. Research how to prevent UTIs by using multi-pronged ‘best practice’ care.

  • Yes! Caregiving has made me a better person. I’m the sandwich generation, caring for both a small child and an aging parent. This role has made me step back and appreciate every single little moment of joy. And oftentimes I have to work hard to create these moments, but they are worth it. My daughter and I created the Give Back project where we document a monthly service project to help others in similar situations. This month, we are writing thank you letters. I’m thanking my hospice team, my daughter is thanking her grandmother. Next month, we will collect Baby Dolls and Blankets and deliver them to dementia patients to give them comfort. Anyone interested in donating should visit my channel!

  • A particularly beautiful music video about dementia from the incredible Irish artist, Laura Mulcahy. Really worth looking and listening.
    https://youtu.be/2rK4mQrJN24

  • My mother got to age 80 before dementia actually set in but it progressed quickly. for months we battled w her we thought she was going insane. we couldtn even control her. doctors couldnt either then we discovered thru a doctor a med called Citalopram. omg it was like turning off a faucet and so far so good. we have had to increase the dosage but it flattened her out and didnt change her persona and we are thrilled. its not expensive either and worksgreat.i understand it works by clearing the sticky substance that builds up in the brain w elder ly ppl so they can think straight. yea.. for us caregivers taking care of mom forever..

  • Thank you, Dr. Tan. Lots of helpful information here. My wife has mid-stage FTD so I need to be mentally prepared for what’s to come.

  • Garlic may doas much for your brain as it can do for your body by helping to protect you from age-related diseases like Alzheimer’s disease and dementia…. In addition, garlic has been found to improve many brain functions, such as memory, learning and mood. See Pubmed!!!!!!!!!!

    Also, The latest studies on turmeric show that curcumin can cross the blood-brain barrier and has the potential to help clear these plaques. Again, see PUBMED!!!!!

    Also, based on results in labtests, [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol and [6]-shogaol were found to be able to penetrate the BBB via passive diffusion, suggesting them to contribute to the positive effects of ginger extracts in the central nervous system.

    @t
    @t

    Lets get practical. Do this: Take a 3cm piece of aged spicy ginger root. blend it together in your favourite smoothy. Drink it immediately. Analize how you feel in your brain.

    Now, take that same 3cm piece of ginger root and slowely chew it up. keep the juice in you mouth for as long as possible allowing the ginger chemicals to be absorped sublingually into your blood stream. These chemicals will reach your brain withing a minute! If you can stand the spicyness, you’ll feel an incredible sensation in your brain. Now this is the power of Sublingual Absorption! The power of Natural Antifungals and phytochemicals crossing the BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER.

    You’re welcome!

  • Dimentia has completely took my grandma to an insane state and to the point where she is such a nuisance she wakes up in the middle of the night screaming about nonsense and I cannot sleep, she treats my mom like a personal servant and takes everything to the extreme she has peed 2 times on our carpets then denied it I just want her to pass quickly and so I can take the rest of my teenagehood back

  • I wouldn’t wish this most horrific disease on Satan himself…my Mom has vascular dementia…truly horrific!! When he talks about latter stage dementia..my Mom does all that, just us kids take care of her..thank God for internet..still doesn’t make it easier to deal with but at least gives me an understanding of what is happening…she refuses all meds so…Blessings to all who are going thru this including the patient!!

  • This is not helpful Dr., you’re lecturing. Those who are living with this person know a lot but knowing is not enough. We need ways to deal with this intractable, horrifying disease.

  • Very helpful. My 57 year old wife has both MS and advanced dementia, exhibiting many of the symptoms outlined in the presentation. I was already planning to meet her neuro this week to discuss palliative care. Steve Jones (Manchester, England)

  • Thank you so much…this video helped answer some of my questions. My mama is in the last stages and it is the hardest thing I have ever dealt with. Thank you again.

  • Blessed be and thank you so much. I recently brought my mom into my house and she had cjd, crutchfield Jacob’s disease and it has been the hardest cruelest, saddest thing I have ever had to do. Any information is well appreciated. Thank you. Peace.

  • Heads Up Display Goggles Tuned To Biometric And AI Computation Should Lead To Progression,Tune It With Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Re Enforcing Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Not To Mention Neutropics And We May Overwrite The Influence Of Dead Cells

  • I have a new 73 yo male.He is in great shape,did construction,hunted,baked pizza…..now he wanders up,down….2minutes and away he goes.All day,all night.
    He is an absolute gentleman. Great family.This is a great start for me.You are interesting,and engaging.Thank you.

  • GOODNESS! DONT JUST ACCEPT DIS EASES!! FIGHT THEM WITH ALL THAT’S AVAILABLE TRY THIS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0fEGww5nsA

  • My father was diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia in 2013 now since last 10 days he is ICU fighting for life being in last stage of dementia, going through this video gave me all those memories of progression of my father’s disease, I know he dont have much time but I am happy I made his life easier to bear the pain and now I want to devote all my remaining life to aware people about dementia mostly in the countries where medical facilities are on initial stages

  • Great video.. i hiked to raise funds and awareness about Alzheimer’s.. here is a trailer of that V-Log… it was done purely to help those suffering from this…

    https://youtu.be/v6ZPG4iZD1U

  • Each stage brings its own unique set of challenges. This article provides details on what to expect through each and how you can help: https://superiorseniorhomecare.com/7-stages-of-dementia-how-to-prepare-for-parents-with-it/

  • I’m a support worker who has many dreary days and nights. Never heard of job crafting but it makes sense. Hood ideas in this talk.

  • Thank you. I needed this. My friend didnt ate yesterday. I was only able to feed him half a bowl of cereal last night. I hope today everything will be normal.

  • Its the most horrible disease my mother is going through it when there is nothing that you can do about it no matter what help you get all i can say is why? this is for my mum i love you all our family do please god help as much as possible my mums name is elsie scott born 1942 from liverpool uk mum i love you always YNWA6 ����������

  • ( 1:15) When you’re 19 yrs old, white and so privileged in life you think you can jump on to a commuter train but end up getting nearly killed… as bad as all that is, I think the worst part is having to end up on a HuffPost video lol.

  • guys i know some of your audience is more interested in fredos emotions and the concerns chief warren has about the epstein error, however i also suggest taking another run around the omar project, to see if theres not a literal ocean full of irregularities that cant be covered up then proudly paraded as progress. as far as the consequences for the guilty criminal lieleak garbage and their less than impressive agendas, that wont need your approval excuses or explanation. so lets take the matters you can best mismanage according to what the clinton scam expectations are, and see what we can eliminate.

  • Helping your parents or your pets or people who cant help themselves gives you a fulfilment beyond any drugs or money or anything else in this world its the only way to true happiness.

  • Dementia is among the most twisted of ways to exit life. Caregivers are also victims. I hate dementia with every cell in my being.

  • OMGoodness about all 5 family members with dementia! I thought caring for Rose was tough! Five?? I co-authored The Inspired Caregiver for the health of the caregiver. It is a book to read a bit at a time and inhale a positive affirmation or repeat the Inspired Caregiver pledge. It is amazing how Phyllis shares about the neighbor stealing the car (type 1 sociopaths are everywhere waiting to take advantage of others)… I hear a book in Phyllis’ story! This was wonderful! Thank you, Phyllis!