Cancer Of The Breast Vaccine Shows Promise at the begining of Trial

 

Clinical Trials for Breast Cancer Vaccine MedStar Health Cancer Network

Video taken from the channel: MedStar Health


 

Focusing on You: Vaccine Trial for Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Video taken from the channel: University of Miami Health System


 

Breast Cancer Vaccines

Video taken from the channel: Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation


 

Breast cancer vaccine clinical trial making progress

Video taken from the channel: WPTV News FL Palm Beaches and Treasure Coast


 

Breast cancer vaccine trial

Video taken from the channel: UW Medicine


 

CBS Evening News Experimental breast cancer vaccine shows promise

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Experimental breast cancer vaccine shows promise

Video taken from the channel: CBS


December 3, 2014 / 9:59 AM / HealthDay An experimental vaccine designed to stop breast cancer in its tracks appeared to be safe in a preliminary trial. Fourteen women with breast cancer. TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) An experimental vaccine designed to stop breast cancer in its tracks appeared to be safe in a preliminary trial.

Fourteen women with breast cancer. By Bailey Vogt The Washington Times Friday, October 11, 2019 A vaccine undergoing clinical trials has shown success in eliminating cancer cells from the body of a breast cancer survivor. A new cancer vaccine has given researchers hope after it removed cancer cells in a patient with breast cancer.

Dr. Saranya Chumsri, an oncologist at the Mayo Clinic, said the vaccine is “supposed to stimulate a patient’s own immune response so that the immune cells like t-cells would go in and attack the cancer.”. TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) An experimental vaccine designed to stop breast cancer in its tracks appeared to be safe in a preliminary trial. Fourteen women with breast cancer that had spread were injected with a vaccine that targets a specific protein, known as mammaglobin-A, that is found in high amounts in breast tumors.

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) An experimental vaccine designed to stop breast cancer in its tracks appeared to be safe in a preliminary trial. Fourteen women with breast cancer that had spread were injected with a vaccine that targets a specific protein, known as mammaglobin-A, that is found in high amounts in breast tumors. Doctors say a new vaccine undergoing clinical trials at the Mayo Clinic has effectively removed cancer cells, providing new hope for cancer survivors.

– A vaccine developed by Duke Cancer Institute researchers has shown early promise in targeting the HER2 protein that fuels a deadly form of breast cancer. In a phase 1 clinical trial that enrolled 22 women with recurrent cancers that overexpress the HER2 protein, the vaccine demonstrated an ability to halt tumor growth and improve survival for a subset of patients. Mayo Clinic investigator, Keith L. Knutson, Ph.D. in an interview today. Knutson said the research is in its early phases, and it will be at least three years before a phase 3 trial of Mayo. A vaccine undergoing testing at the Mayo Clinic has reportedly removed cancer cells in a breast cancer patient.

Florida resident Lee Mercker became the first patient to participate in a clinical.

List of related literature:

Finally, attention should be given to more recent vaccine recommendations for adolescents and young adults to protect against human papillomavirus, meningococcus, and pertussis.

“Transplantation of the Liver E-Book” by Ronald W. Busuttil, Goran B. Klintmalm
from Transplantation of the Liver E-Book
by Ronald W. Busuttil, Goran B. Klintmalm
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2014

Final report of the phase I/II clinical trial of the E75 (nelipepimut-S) vaccine with booster inoculations to prevent disease recurrence in high-risk breast cancer patients.

“Abeloff's Clinical Oncology E-Book” by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, James H Doroshow, Michael B. Kastan, Joel E. Tepper
from Abeloff’s Clinical Oncology E-Book
by John E. Niederhuber, James O. Armitage, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2019

So after all of these trials, what have we learned and what is the significance with regard to the current pursuit of a vaccine?

“Vaccines for Biodefense and Emerging and Neglected Diseases” by Alan D.T. Barrett, Lawrence R. Stanberry
from Vaccines for Biodefense and Emerging and Neglected Diseases
by Alan D.T. Barrett, Lawrence R. Stanberry
Elsevier Science, 2009

“Our long-term goal in the next 5–10 years is to use this vaccine for prevention in women at high risk for breast cancer,” Vonderheide said.

“Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.” by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
from Journal of the National Cancer Institute: JNCI.
by National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, 2010

Whereas mAb appropriately continue to be evaluated via traditional clinical trial paradigms, vaccine approaches historically have been associated with few serious adverse effects.

“Measuring Immunity: Basic Science and Clinical Practice” by Michael T. Lotze, Angus W. Thomson
from Measuring Immunity: Basic Science and Clinical Practice
by Michael T. Lotze, Angus W. Thomson
Elsevier Science, 2011

Another phase I trial was also initiated in patients with metastatic breast cancer without evidence of disease or with stable disease on hormone therapy.180 Again, vaccination was able to stimulate the production of IgM antibodies in a majority of patients.

“Comprehensive Natural Products II: Chemistry and Biology” by Lewis Mander, Hung-Wen Liu
from Comprehensive Natural Products II: Chemistry and Biology
by Lewis Mander, Hung-Wen Liu
Elsevier Science, 2010

A phase III trial of this vaccine was recently completed as well.

“Schiff's Diseases of the Liver” by Eugene R. Schiff, Willis C. Maddrey, Michael F. Sorrell
from Schiff’s Diseases of the Liver
by Eugene R. Schiff, Willis C. Maddrey, Michael F. Sorrell
Wiley, 2011

The principal investigators of the newer adjuvant trials will probably not publish their preliminary results as early as the investigators in the original breast cancer and osteogenicsarcoma protocols.

“Cancer Treatment Reports” by National Institutes of Health (U.S.), National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Cancer Institute (U.S.). Division of Cancer Treatment
from Cancer Treatment Reports
by National Institutes of Health (U.S.), National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Cancer Institute (U.S.). Division of Cancer Treatment
U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, 1980

Promising results have been reported from a small randomized clinical trial of active immunization with a vaccine targeting ErbB2 protein in 171 patients with early breast cancer: the vaccine significantly reduced the risk of recurrence without causing serious toxic effects.

“Management of Breast Diseases” by Ismail Jatoi, Manfred Kaufmann
from Management of Breast Diseases
by Ismail Jatoi, Manfred Kaufmann
Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2010

This issue came to a head in 1993, when the National Cancer Institute in the USA assessed the available randomized trial evidence on breast cancer screening in women under age 50, concluded that the benefits were uncertain, and changed its previous recommendation which supported screening in this age group.

“Critical Appraisal of Epidemiological Studies and Clinical Trials” by J. Mark Elwood
from Critical Appraisal of Epidemiological Studies and Clinical Trials
by J. Mark Elwood
Oxford University Press, 2007

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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  • @TheMysticCore It may, but the chances of that are slim if they do it over a spaced time period. That way the body adapts to the change progressively.