Can Smartphones Lead to Mental Healthcare

 

Why Constant Smartphone Use Is Bad For Your Health

Video taken from the channel: Tech Insider


 

Smartphone Technology Helps Mental Health Patients

Video taken from the channel: VOA News


 

2019 WMIF | Mental Health, Smartphone Apps and the Promise of AI

Video taken from the channel: World Medical Innovation Forum


 

How digital technology can be used to improve mental health services for patients and staff

Video taken from the channel: NHS England and NHS Improvement


 

My smartphone can do…what? mHealth and the future of Mental Health Care

Video taken from the channel: UW PBSCI


 

Can Smartphones Solve the Mental Health Crisis? | Tom Insel | TEDxVeniceBeach

Video taken from the channel: TEDx Talks


 

Could smartphones spot teen depression?

Video taken from the channel: Associated Press


Many researchers and policy makers are hopeful that smartphones will play a key role in mental health treatment in the future. They are seen as a way to reach many of the people who currently do. Smartphones offer one promising avenue for deployment of mental health resources and services, given their increasing worldwide ubiquity, ability to collect and monitor information relevant to mental illnesses, and feasibility to augment treatments as well as to offer adjunctive interventions. Alongside concerns expressed in the media, some experts believe that technology has a role in the rising rates of mental health problems. However, there is also evidence to suggest your smartphone could actually be good for your mental health.

An unanticipated problem was encountered, check back soon and try again. Smartphones may not be bad for teens’ mental health after all. Source: Photo by Mr.Autthaporn Pradidpong on Unsplash The study surveyed more than 2,000 adolescents, and then more closely followed.

Now, new research suggests that when children at risk of mental health problems spend a lot of time on smartphones or other digital technology, they’re more at. Smartphones, Tablets Cause Mental Health Issues in Kids as Young as Two by DailyHealthPost EditorialJuly 4, 2019 Our smartphones —we’d feel lost without them. They serve many purposes; sometimes they are a quick way to distract fussy or “bored” children and keep them occupied. That’s why reports that smartphones are causing mental health problems among adolescents have caught my attention.

If true, this link would be a major breakthrough in clinical practice. Parents, clinicians, and educators would have an easily identifiable target for addressing mental health problems among teens. Smartphones can play an important role in helping the 77 million American adults with poor health literacy achieve better health.

The health care industry can’t expect consumers to take on. Resolution 60.29 of the World Health Assembly commented that Health Technologies are “indispensable for effective and efficient prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of diseases.” 2 The smartphone can play a central role in making this resolution a reality and is becoming more accessible for millions around the world. A role for mental health nursing in the physical health care of consumers with severe mental illness. as a professional group at the crossroads of mental and physical health, have an important role to play in lifting standards of physical care.

The authors propose that nurses can improve the quality of physical care for people with a severe.

List of related literature:

Although the rate of smartphone ownership is rising rapidly in the United States, not all patients will own a mobile device that is compatible with the ability to download mental health apps.

“Technology and Adolescent Mental Health” by Megan A. Moreno, Ana Radovic
from Technology and Adolescent Mental Health
by Megan A. Moreno, Ana Radovic
Springer International Publishing, 2018

However, there is a concern that this use of technology will reduce the level of face-to-face support that a person with mental health issues may receive.176 There is relatively little that can be done to compel a patient in the community to act in a particular way, outside the powers of detention under the MHA 1983.

“Medical Law and Ethics” by Jonathan Herring
from Medical Law and Ethics
by Jonathan Herring
Oxford University Press, 2016

However, there is a concern that this use of technology will reduce the level of face-to-face support that a person with mental health issues may receive.148 There is relatively little that can be done to compel a patient in the community to act in a particular way, outside the powers of detention under the MHA 1983.

“Medical Law and Ethics” by Jonathan Herring
from Medical Law and Ethics
by Jonathan Herring
Oxford University Press, 2020

With Monarca, mental health patients self-report on their mood, sleep, activity and medication adherence on a daily basis, using a mobile phone.

“Introduction to Nursing Informatics” by Kathryn J. Hannah, Pamela Hussey, Margaret A. Kennedy, Marion J. Ball
from Introduction to Nursing Informatics
by Kathryn J. Hannah, Pamela Hussey, et. al.
Springer London, 2014

GPs may also be involved in the mental health care of people with SMI in the UK, although the majority, at least two-thirds, will be receiving care from mental health services [8].

“New Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry” by John R. Geddes, Nancy C. Andreasen, Guy M. Goodwin
from New Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry
by John R. Geddes, Nancy C. Andreasen, Guy M. Goodwin
Oxford University Press, 2020

Patients could also gain mobile access to social support systems as discussed in the previous section.

“Interventions for Addiction: Comprehensive Addictive Behaviors and Disorders, Volume 3” by Peter M. Miller
from Interventions for Addiction: Comprehensive Addictive Behaviors and Disorders, Volume 3
by Peter M. Miller
Elsevier Science, 2013

Professionals in healthcare settings (e.g., nurses, physicians, social workers, psychologists, discharge planners) can play important roles in detecting vulnerabilities and intervening suspected EA cases due to their regular interactions with older patients.

“Elder Abuse: Research, Practice and Policy” by XinQi Dong
from Elder Abuse: Research, Practice and Policy
by XinQi Dong
Springer International Publishing, 2017

Beyond that, individual patient and therapist needs as well as short-term issues must be considered in determining an appropriate telephone policy.

“Cognitive-behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder” by Marsha Linehan
from Cognitive-behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder
by Marsha Linehan
Guilford Publications, 1993

The implementation study by Nadort et al., (2009), which investigated the costeffectiveness of ST in regular mental healthcare, explicitly considered extra phone support in a comparison.

“The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Schema Therapy: Theory, Research, and Practice” by Michiel van Vreeswijk, Jenny Broersen, Marjon Nadort
from The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Schema Therapy: Theory, Research, and Practice
by Michiel van Vreeswijk, Jenny Broersen, Marjon Nadort
Wiley, 2015

For example, some therapists always answer their cell phones while others use an answering service; some allow patients to contact them at home on weekends while others do not.

“Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: A Clinical Manual” by Deborah L. Cabaniss, Sabrina Cherry, Carolyn J. Douglas, Anna R. Schwartz
from Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: A Clinical Manual
by Deborah L. Cabaniss, Sabrina Cherry, et. al.
Wiley, 2016

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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5 comments

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  • There is no need to see notification of social media again and again because we can see at a particular time in a day. and there is no loss of your money or any other thing if you will not see. everyone should have to fix time to see this and follow this habit. if you are facing problem following this, then you have to start telling to yourself that there is no loss no profit to see again and again, this is not so important than your eating, your study, your sleeping etc. if you will ask anyone that why you checks your phone again and again, then he or she will not have any hard reason. so it is proved that this is only a habit and can be cure with telling yourself on your own. telling self that this is redundant to check many times a day. if you feel that it is important to you, then feeling just after that ask with yourself how it is important, i am sure no hard reason will come.

  • Check out this blog it will really give you the idea to control your overusing habits of smartphone https://smarterday2day.blogspot.com/2020/02/top-10-secrets-to-stop-using-smartphone.html?m=1

  • Strong topic and one that needs a lot of awareness especially when it deals with mental health! Found a lot of inspiration here for my channel and videos!

  • hi can you tray to make test to helpe people how has mental illness to hear this vedio https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRrqF8T0_ic

  • why some people really enjoy putting themselves in the video for so long? seriously, you could include infographics, but you rather preferred having this guy talking for 95% of the whole video.