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Now, a new study has concluded that the more hours a new mom works, the tougher it is for her to continue breastfeeding. Mothers working 19 or fewer hours a week were much more likely to maintain breastfeeding through their babies’ sixth month of life, compared to moms who had returned to full-time employment, said lead researcher Ning Xiang. Now, a new study has concluded that the more hours a new mom works, the tougher it is for her to continue breast-feeding. Mothers working 19 or fewer hours a week.

Now, a new study has concluded that the more hours a new mom works, the tougher it is for her to continue breast-feeding. Mothers working 19 or fewer hours a week were much more likely to maintain breast-feeding through their babies ‘ sixth month of life, compared to moms who had returned to full-time employment, said lead researcher Ning Xiang. On the other hand, women working between 20 hours and 34 hours a week had a 45 percent chance of stopping, and moms working 35 or more hours had a 60 percent chance that they’d drop breast-feeding.

hours and 34 hours a week had a 45 percent chance of stopping, and moms working 35 or more hours had a 60 percent chance that they’d drop breast-feeding. “Given the time-consuming nature of breast The federal Break Time for Nursing Mothers law requires employers covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to provide basic accommodations for breastfeeding mothers at work. These accommodations include time for women to express milk and a private space that is not a bathroom each time they need to pump.

At work, you should try pumping every three to four hours for around 15 minutes a session. This may sound like a lot, but it goes back to that concept of. By law breastfeeding employees are entitled to 60 minutes time off or a reduction in work hours in an eight hour working day without loss of pay for up to 26 weeks after birth. The legislation allows breastfeeding time to be increased or decreased pro-rata depending on your working hours.

As a general rule, in the first few months of life, babies need to breastfeed eight to 12 times in 24 hours. As the baby gets older, the number of feedings may go down. Pumping can take about 10 to 15 minutes once you are used to using your breast pump.

Sometimes it may take longer. Many women use their regular breaks and lunch break to pump. Breastfeeding on days 5 to 7 Once you’ve gotten over the hump of the first few days, you might be starting to find a groove with breastfeeding.

Your baby will still be nursing very frequently, about 10 times in 24 hours. Some will have a slightly longer stretch (though not always at night!), but most will need to nurse every two hours or so.

List of related literature:

Talk with women who have returned to work and breastfed successfully.

“Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide” by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, Ann Keppler, Janelle Durham, April Bolding
from Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn: The Complete Guide
by Janet Walley, Penny Simkin, et. al.
Meadowbrook, 2016

In some settings, mothers are able to breastfeed during the workday, either by going to an on-site daycare center or by having a friend or relative bring the baby to her for some feedings.

“Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book” by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, Kathryn Rhodes Alden, Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk, Mary Catherine Cashion, David Wilson
from Maternal Child Nursing Care E-Book
by Shannon E. Perry, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

However, direct suckling at the breast during the first 24 hours postpartum interacts with maternal obesity status to determine milk transfer at 60 hours postpartum.

“Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician” by Marsha Walker
from Breastfeeding Management for the Clinician
by Marsha Walker
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2016

Many mothers who work outside the home or attend school feel that breastfeeding offers emotional compensation for the hours that must be spent apart.

“The Nursing Mother's Companion” by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
from The Nursing Mother’s Companion
by Ruth A. Lawrence, Kathleen Huggins
Harvard Common Press, 2005

And then there are children who like to nurse either continuously, or at least every 45 minutes to an hour, and nurse less vigorously, but for longer stretches.

“Breastfeeding: Biocultural Perspectives” by Patricia Stuart Macadam, Katherine A. Dettwyler
from Breastfeeding: Biocultural Perspectives
by Patricia Stuart Macadam, Katherine A. Dettwyler
Transaction Publishers,

Counseling a breastfeeding family when the mother returns to work should also include attention to mothering the mother.

“Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession” by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
from Breastfeeding: A Guide for the Medical Profession
by Ruth A. Lawrence, MD, Robert M. Lawrence, MD
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Breastfeeding forces you to take regular breaks throughout the day—the very thing that a new mother should be doing.

“The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything In Between” by Ann Douglas
from The Mother of All Pregnancy Books: An All-Canadian Guide to Conception, Birth and Everything In Between
by Ann Douglas
Wiley, 2011

Unfortunately, returning to work or school is a major cause of discontinuation of breastfeeding.

“Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women's Health Nursing E-Book” by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
from Foundations of Maternal-Newborn and Women’s Health Nursing E-Book
by Sharon Smith Murray, Emily Slone McKinney
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2017

breastfeeding, it suddenly becomes far less work than bottlefeeding, which requires shopping, preparation, washing, and wide-awake nighttime feedings.

“Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers” by Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman
from Breastfeeding Made Simple: Seven Natural Laws for Nursing Mothers
by Nancy Mohrbacher, Kathleen Kendall-Tackett, Jack Newman
New Harbinger Publications, 2010

Many employed breastfeeding mothers who work during the day find that their babies’ sleep patterns change after their return to work.

“Breastfeeding and Human Lactation” by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
from Breastfeeding and Human Lactation
by Karen Wambach, Becky Spencer
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2019

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

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12 comments

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  • I am close to delivery on baby #2 and I did breastfeed my first for 22 months. With that said, I had SO much anxiety in the first few months of his life, thinking I wasn’t producing enough, because he wasn’t gaining weight as well as the doctors preferred. I am excited this time to let that anxiety go and really embrace my confidence in that my body knows what it’s doing, and really settle into my own intuition as a mama instead of listening to those around me (that maybe weren’t the most encouraging). Breastfeeding is incredible and I’m so excited to be beginning this journey again.

  • Thank you for another great, educational video! You make me feel so prepared (or as prepared as one can hope to be, lol) to be a mama!

  • I don’t want it to end… I can’t wait until Sunday’s ❣️ Watching babies come into the world is a beautiful way to spend your Sunday. It gives you hope��

  • For the first 5 years of my life I was cared for by a few people. Since my parents got divorced when I was nearly 1 my dad nearly never saw me and he had drug issues so he was away. I also spent a lot of time alone at a hella young age (2ish) sometimes. So from age 0 to 5: I spent 45% of my time under my Nana’s care, 15% with my mom, 10% with my dads parents with him there occasionally, 25% on the streets under care from either local moms or more often older cholo kids or even the senior cholo bangers in their late 30s to early 60s (I was one of the few white families at the time), and about 5% in a town out of state with my grandmother’s deceased older sister’s daughter who older than my mom and is my godmother in a different state.

  • My 84 year old Mom passed away 3 weeks ago, and the bottom of my heart has been ripped out of me. I wish I could have known what I know now. I would have cuddled her like a baby, or just kissed her more on her forehead firmly. I will never forgive myself for feeling annoyed. I was so stupid. I was so so ridiculously stupid, really.

  • When baby is low birth weight baby and doesn’t have energy to feed from the breasts, should we start pumping immediately after baby is born?

  • So happy I found this video. I failed breastfeeding with my first. I’m 30 weeks and nervous but determined and happy this video answered my questions.

  • Do you have a video about formula feeding and incorporating that as a supplement? My baby eats so much that he empties me out and is still hungry.. often eating for well over an hour both sides, usually only taking a break to burp, diaper, or take the occasional nap. He’s getting enough, but he is eating so often I’m raw.

  • Nice video with good tips! I’d also recommend this book ‘Easy Breastfeeding Diet’ by Sheila Watson…. great resource for young moms:) You’re welcome!

  • I just came across your channel…
    I m 32 weeks pregnant and a first time mom.
    All the videos you make are really really helping me to know everything abt taking all good care of baby before she arrives.
    I have one question like, how long after baby’s birth does milk flow will start?

  • Don’t put your parents in these death centers. They will be abused and neglected. There is no two ways about it. They look nice, clean and friendly here, but behind the scenes it is a totally different picture. I have given up a great deal to care for my father at home so he does not end up in such a place, there is no reason others can’t as well.

  • I never needed the Hoffman test with my severely inverted nipples, it was obvious. There was no chance with grade 3 inversion for me to feed my babies. Constricted milk ducts compounded the problem. If you have severely inverted nipples, don’t be pressured into thinking that you are a failure if you are unable to breastfeed. I was so thankful for formula and just…fed my babies.