Brain Damage Present in Greater Than 40 % of Ex-National football league Players

 

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Brain scans of 40 former NFL players, age 36 on average, found that nearly 43 percent had significantly more damage to the brain’s white matter. (HealthDay)—Two out of five retired National Football League players may suffer from traumatic brain injuries, a small study suggests. Brain scans of 40 former NFL players, age 36 on average, found.

Brain scans of 40 former NFL players, age 36 on average, found that nearly 43 percent had significantly more damage to the brain’s white matter than healthy adults the same age, researchers said. Also, testing showed about half had significant problems following through on goals, and more than two out of five had learning, memory or attention problems. It shows that “more than 40 percent of retired National Football League players had signs of traumatic brain injury based on sensitive MRI scans called diffusion tensor imaging,” according to. Study shows “definitive link.” More than 40 percent of retired National Football League players had signs of traumatic brain injuries, a new study.

Brain scans of 40 former NFL players, age 36 on average, found that nearly 43 percent had significantly more damage to the brain’s white matter than healthy adults the same age, researchers said. It shows 40 percent of former players had some form of brain damage. “We looked at 40 retired NFL players for signs of traumatic brain injury and we found approximately 43 percent. Amid mounting concerns over the health of pro football players, a new study has shown that as many as 40 percent of retired NFL superstars could be suffering from traumatic brain injury.

Study: More than 40 Percent of Retired NFL Players Had Brain Injury More than 40 percent of retired National Football League (NFL) players in a recent study had signs of traumatic brain injury. VANCOUVER, British Columbia, April 11, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ More than 40 percent of retired National Football League (NFL) players in a recent study had signs of traumatic brain injury.

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As you might imagine, we saw high levels of brain damage in players, but we also saw the possibility of recovery in 80 percent of them.[19] In addition, depression was very high in these players—four times the national average.

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from Feel Better Fast and Make It Last: Unlock Your Brain’s Healing Potential to Overcome Negativity, Anxiety, Anger, Stress, and Trauma
by Dr. Daniel G. Amen
Tyndale House Publishers, Incorporated, 2018

Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that of all reported brain injuries, 75 percent are due to mild concussions (mTBI), although the number of unreported concussions and patients not seeking medical help is likely high as well.

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from Peak: The New Science of Athletic Performance That is Revolutionizing Sports
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In our study, the number of concussions a player had was not associated with the level of brain damage.

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from Memory Rescue: Supercharge Your Brain, Reverse Memory Loss, and Remember What Matters Most
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Repeated sports-related TBI was reported as 19%, but that number, like all reports of sports-related head traumas, is probably an understatement.

“Concussion and Traumatic Encephalopathy: Causes, Diagnosis and Management” by Jeff Victoroff, Erin D. Bigler
from Concussion and Traumatic Encephalopathy: Causes, Diagnosis and Management
by Jeff Victoroff, Erin D. Bigler
Cambridge University Press, 2019

This was a significant finding; players who didn’t have any symptoms likely went on playing after hard impacts, not realizing they were risking further head trauma, and more serious neurologic injury and intellectual deterioration.

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In addition, postmortems have revealed that 87 of 91 deceased NFL players whose bodies were examined had chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a disease associated with repeated traumatic blows to the head.

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Since the 1920s, CTE has been known to affect boxers; in recent years, high rates of neuropathologically confirmed CTE have been reported in retired professional football players and other athletes with a history of repetitive brain trauma (Lehman et al. 2012).

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from Textbook of Medical Psychiatry
by Paul Summergrad, M.D., David A. Silbersweig, M.D., et. al.
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Twenty­one percent of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are attributed to sports.

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About 20% of high school and 40% of college football players sustain some kind of brain injury during their playing days; once they do, the chances that they will sustain another increase by two to four times.

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Approximately 50 percent of individuals who experience a mild traumatic brain injury report symptoms associated with a postconcussive syndrome 3 or more months after the injury (Rutherford, 1989).

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Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

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19 comments

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  • I had a concussion from a car accident I ended up have the worst migraine headaches u could ever imagine for a whole month I had them even after I healed I still suffered from headaches every now and then

  • Returning to RUGBY League or Union…the biggest mistake of football history was wear the helmets and pads. it is true…people overconfidence it. should prohibit forward pass and don’t stop at knee down!

  • I’m afraid that Brian is gonna lash out on the family. The guy is big and I hope he’s getting treatment. Keep your head up Big Brian.

  • If you allow your kids to play football then you’re literally causing them brain damage. I will never allow my kids to play football or hockey!

  • This is sad. You can hear the pain in his voice. Thank you for this speech. Please ban football and the NFL, they are modern day gladiator arenas.

  • Hearing the NFL only donated 1 million dollars to the research is a joke. The NFL makes anywhere from 11.5 billion dollars to 14.7 billion dollars depending on which team goes to the superbowl. The NFL makes 2.7 million dollars off a single 30 second commercial. The revenue off commercials alone is $275 million dollars a super bowl and steadily increases each year, not to mention they also make money off sports stuff and stadium revenue.I support Jacob Bell decision to retire. He seen the light

  • Terrible. So many players have CJD now. The nfl tried to hide the evidence. The effects of CJD are real and I think Antonio Brown got it after he got hit against the tigers

  • The NFL will not survive without the helmet. Not only is it a piece of equipment but that helmet is also a brand for each franchise.

  • He talks about Pituitary gland and with increased intracranial pressure from obstructions of the c spine, you can have pressure on the pit gland. this is also something Jim’s doctor talks about

  • Interesting. I heard a similar thing about boxing gloves and boxing helmets making the sport more dangerous because before those people hesitated to hit their opponents in the head for fear of breaking their fingers on the bony jaw or cranium. Now boxers’ heads get jostled, and it creates the same problem for them as for football players.

  • Football players in college and pros don’t even know how to tackle properly. This guy doesn’t understand that your brain shaking in your head is a concussion. Its not just getting knocked out. Mike Webster was a center. He wasn’t tackling people and he got hit in the head with hands, and elbows and helmets all the time. Probably never got knocked out. Yet he was messed up. No matter how safe you play the game you will still have concussions.

  • I dont know why these professional athletes think somebody owes them something for the choices they made. You didn’t seem to mind cashing all the paychecks you got.

  • I’m 12 and I’ve had 7 concussions and 5 of them are from playing afl and 2 from school sometimes when I get up I nearly fall over and lose my balance and I always forget stuff my 2 closest concussion are 2 weeks. I feel you Kevin and every one else suffering from Australia ����

  • Surely it’d just be rugby then? But I see the basis for this is similar to the point that less deaths occurred in bare-knuckle boxing due to extra care being taken.

  • Things have changed so much into understanding the damage concussions can do.
    The first concussion I had was the worst and permanately damaged my neck as I went head over heels on a crosscheck I didnt see coming ( then again that’s how they all are anyways..lol)
    This is back in 1975 but when I got to the hospital the drs advice was for my mom to check on me every couple hours to see I’m breathing still.
    That was how a concussion was treated then and if I was conscious I’m sure the coach would have put me back in the game.
    I’m already showing neurological problems that they think are related to years of head trauma and I only wish I knew then what I know now..
    The only reason cte, etc seems to be growing it’s because people around my age suffered repeated concussions not knowing the risks.
    One thing I decided to do is found a hospital in Boston that specializes in concussions and I decided to donate my brain for research on concussions.
    Cant think of a better way to make lemonade out of lemons.

  • I’ve had 13 serious concussions that I can remember, spanning from 4 years old to 30 something. Most occurred in my teens. Most of these were extreme blows to the head. I’m 47 now and noticing many effects which I assume stem from them. I’m very anti social and prefer isolation. I have what I call brain lock constantly. Just going blank. My coordination is jittery and I get tremors all over. I have a much harder time focusing on thoughts and memories. My memory is sporadic and vague, even from the day before. Not looking forward to getting older.

  • This breaks my heart to see. My son is 26. Like come on. They are in denial and it makes me sick. Our kids are not rams. They are not animals and the sport is prehistoric.

  • I think I’m one of a thousand living examples of this scary stuff. I was born prematurely and suffered brain damage as a result, due to that I have cerebral palsy. Around age 10 or 11 I was diagnosed with epilepsy. I’ve suffered a handful of concussions so far and all I can say is that they’re no joke. I’m very lucky to be where I am considering my health but I know this stuff will continue in the game of football, a sport I love. Do I want it banned? No. Do I believe it could be played in a safer way? Yes. Football is no joke people.

  • This scares me about my dad cause he’s a College baseball umpire but he’s got 10+ concussions and he already forgets lots of things and a couple times he’ll even even ask me the same question twice in an hour and not even know that he it said before, and he also forgets a lot of things. idk if he really does have it but he also gets mad and kinda does have mood swings. But I hope it’s just cause he’s getting old.