Bloodstream Tests May Predict Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Flare-Ups

 

COPD Treatment Follow-up

Video taken from the channel: Dr. Andras Fazakas


 

COPD Exacerbations Treatment with antibiotics

Video taken from the channel: Dr. Andras Fazakas


 

New blood tests may predict heart issues

Video taken from the channel: KCAU-TV Sioux City


 

Understanding COPD and the impact of disease flare-ups

Video taken from the channel: Novartis


 

COPD Exacerbations

Video taken from the channel: Strong Medicine


 

Diagnosis and Evaluation of COPD

Video taken from the channel: Animated COPD Patient


 

Asthma and COPD: Acute Exacerbations

Video taken from the channel: Strong Medicine


Blood Tests May Predict COPD Flare-Ups. Signs of chronic inflammation in the blood linked to faster deterioration of lung function. In a study of more than 61,000 people in Denmark, researchers found that COPD patients who had increased levels of certain proteins and cells in their blood were at greater risk for frequent flare-ups. These particular proteins and cells C-reactive protein, fibrinogen and leukocytes increase in response to infections, tissue damage and inflammation.

TUESDAY, June 11, 2013 (HealthDay News) People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who have signs of chronic inflammation in their blood are more likely to have flare-ups of the lung disease than those who do not, a large new study shows. In addition to the slow, steady deterioration in lung function caused by COPD, patients can have sudden, distressing flare-ups. In a study of more than 61,000 people in Denmark, researchers found that COPD patients who had increased levels of certain proteins and cells in their blood were at greater risk for frequent flare-ups. TUESDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who have signs of chronic inflammation in their blood are more likely to have flare-ups of the lung disease than those who do not, a large new study shows. People with COPD who have signs of chronic inflammation in their blood are more likely to have flare-ups of the lung disease than those who do not, a large new study shows.

In addition to the slow, steady deterioration in lung function caused by COPD, patients can have sudden, distressing flare-ups. In a study of more than 61,000 people in Denmark, researchers found that COPD patients. Blood tests may redict COPD flare-ups People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who have signs of chronic inflammation in their blood are more likely to have flare-ups of the lung.

Blood Tests May Predict COPD Flare Ups WebMD. June 19, 2013. People with COPD who have signs of chronic inflammation in their blood are more likely to have flare-ups of the lung disease than those who do not, a large new study shows. 2 days ago · Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) results in deterioration of lung function and mortality. Previous prediction models.

Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by acute deterioration in symptoms, may be due to bacterial or viral infections, environmental exposures, or unknown factors. Exacerbation frequency may be a stable trait in COPD patients, which could imply genetic susceptibility. Observing the genes, networks, and pathways that are upand down-regulated in COPD.

List of related literature:

In older patients with COPD and no previous smoking history, especially those with a strong family history, a blood test to determine the level of AAT should be considered.

“Brocklehurst's Textbook of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology E-Book” by Howard M. Fillit, Kenneth Rockwood, Kenneth Woodhouse
from Brocklehurst’s Textbook of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology E-Book
by Howard M. Fillit, Kenneth Rockwood, Kenneth Woodhouse
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2010

Per this definition, TRALI may also be diagnosed in a patient with worsening preexisting pulmonary insufficiency (unique to the NHLBI definition), such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis [64].

“Trauma Induced Coagulopathy” by Eduardo Gonzalez, Hunter B. Moore, Ernest E. Moore
from Trauma Induced Coagulopathy
by Eduardo Gonzalez, Hunter B. Moore, Ernest E. Moore
Springer International Publishing, 2016

In addition, high oxygen flow rates can cause an increase in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (Paco2) and suppression of respiratory drive in patients with COPD, so Ms. A should be seen as soon as possible.

“Prioritization, Delegation, and Assignment: Practice Exercises for the NCLEX Examination” by Linda A. LaCharity, Candice K. Kumagai, Barbara Bartz
from Prioritization, Delegation, and Assignment: Practice Exercises for the NCLEX Examination
by Linda A. LaCharity, Candice K. Kumagai, Barbara Bartz
Elsevier/Mosby, 2013

Recent trials have shown that eosinophilia in COPD patients predicts response to corticosteroids.

“Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016 E-Book: 5 Books in 1” by Fred F. Ferri
from Ferri’s Clinical Advisor 2016 E-Book: 5 Books in 1
by Fred F. Ferri
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2015

Any patient who develops COPD without a significant smoking history, any patient with a strong family history of COPD, and any patient developing clinically significant COPD before age 45 should be screened for counseling rier 274 α state 1-antitrypsin can of be patients found deficiency.

“Textbook of Family Medicine E-Book” by David Rakel, Robert E. Rakel
from Textbook of Family Medicine E-Book
by David Rakel, Robert E. Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2011

Any patient who develops COPD without a significant smoking history or any patient developing COPD before age 45 should be screened for α identify 1-antitrypsin granulomatous deficiency.

“Textbook of Family Medicine E-Book” by Robert E. Rakel
from Textbook of Family Medicine E-Book
by Robert E. Rakel
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2007

Another factor to consider, although unlikely with a diagnosis of COPD, is if the patient is pregnant.

“Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics E-Book” by Cate Whittlesea, Karen Hodson
from Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics E-Book
by Cate Whittlesea, Karen Hodson
Elsevier Health Sciences, 2018

He or she will also probably order various blood tests and other diagnostic procedures to confirm the diagnosis of COPD.

“Natural Therapies for Emphysema and COPD: Relief and Healing for Chronic Pulmonary Disorders” by Robert J. Green
from Natural Therapies for Emphysema and COPD: Relief and Healing for Chronic Pulmonary Disorders
by Robert J. Green
Inner Traditions/Bear, 2007

A multinational, cross-sectional, interview-based study of 125 moderate-to-very severe COPD patients with a history of two or more exacerbations in the prior year reported that over one-third of COPD patients said that there were no recognizable signs or symptoms of a pending flare up of their disease [29].

“Textbook of Pulmonary Rehabilitation” by Enrico Clini, Anne E. Holland, Fabio Pitta, Thierry Troosters
from Textbook of Pulmonary Rehabilitation
by Enrico Clini, Anne E. Holland, et. al.
Springer International Publishing, 2017

2004;363:731733.(Hypothesis that inpatientswith COPD, HDACis impairedbycigarette smoking and oxidative stress, leading to reduced responsiveness to corticosteroids; see also Ito et al., 2005,below)

“Rang & Dale's Pharmacology” by Humphrey P. Rang, Maureen M. Dale, James M. Ritter, Rod J. Flower, Graeme Henderson
from Rang & Dale’s Pharmacology
by Humphrey P. Rang, Maureen M. Dale, et. al.
Elsevier Health Sciences UK, 2011

Oktay Kutluk

Kutluk Oktay, MD, FACOG is one of the world's foremost experts in fertility preservation as well as ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization for infertility treatments. He developed and performed the world's first ovarian transplantation procedures as well as pioneered new ovarian stimulation protocols for embryo and oocyte freezing for breast and endometrial cancer patients.

Mail: [email protected]
Telephone: +1 (877) 492-3666

Biography: https://medicine.yale.edu/profile/kutluk_oktay/
Bibliography: oktay_bibliography

View all posts

25 comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • I very recenty got diagnost with copd, bronchial and emphysema. My doctor said it is mild in the beginning. I quit smoking a little over 1 month ago. Should I still see a specialist even though it’s “mild”?
    My doctor said that I don’t need to see a specialist. I think I should be seen by a specialist.
    After numerous tests and diagnostic imaging including mri and ultra sound I was told that they don’t see anything wrong with my heart.

  • thank to doctor Emmanuel,I am from USA, I was diagnosed of Emphysema
    (COPD) in 2015 and I have tried all possible means to get cured, i even
    visited phonologist but all to no avail, until i saw a post in a health
    forum about a herbal doctor from Africa who prepare herbal medicine to cure
    all kind of diseases including Emphysema, at first i doubted if it was real
    but decided to give it a try, when i contacted this herbal doctor via his
    email he sent me the Emphysema herbal medicine through courier service,
    when i received this herbal medicine, he gave me step by instructions on
    how to apply it, when i applied it as instructed i was totally cured of
    this deadly disease within 12-14 days of usage, if you are suffering of
    this diseases you can as well Contact this great herbal doctor via his
    email [email protected] or WhatsApp +2348140073965

    IG:@dremmanuel2

  • What about corticosteroids and exacerbation? Should we use them only once excluded an infection or are they in any case useful? If a patient with COPD has a glucocorticoid in his long term therapy should we suspend it in case of exacerbation with bacterial/viral superinfection?

  • I have being suffering from Parkinson Disease for many years, had try all medication and exercise to try cure myself but still yet nothing happened. I am really glad that Dr Madida from YouTube was able to cure me with his herbal supplement.

  • Four years ago I experienced a severe breathing problems. A year later, it worsened and I was diagnosed of COPD. I came across Herbal HealthPoint (ww w. herbalhealthpoint. c om) December, 2018 and learnt about their successful herbal therapy for COPD. I immediately started on the COPD treatment; i began to notice a reduction in symptoms till it all vanished. I feel better and breath better. I Just wanted to share for people suffering from this horrible lungs disease.

  • I have being suffering from Parkinson Disease for many years, had try all medication and exercise to try cure myself but still yet nothing happened. I am really glad that Dr Madida from YouTube was able to cure me with his herbal supplement.

  • Over diagnosed due to changes in medical insurance….COPD is a big money maker……for pharmaceutical companies and hospitals……make sure you get a second opinion……

  • Dr. Strong, as a 70 y/o with late onset, mild, persistent asthma, it’s been an debilitating ordeal to learn how to live with this strange, new diagnosis. Perhaps it began, when at 56, a persistent runny nose (vasomotor rhinitis) with “suspected asthma” (8% albuterol improvement), seem to have heralded what I have now?

    Breathlessness on exertion (not cough or wheezing) in ‘15 (PFT = 70%) with the telltale curve meant I, indeed, had finally developed asthma. Singulair did nothing, and Flovent made it so I couldn’t talk. A referral a year later to a pulmonologist started Symbicort was the first thing that helped. Only, curiously, I was still breathless.

    Some E/R visits got me both Duo-Neb and hydroxyzine. Stabilized, finally, the bad episodes (3 times), even standing, had my heart rate at 140 (once a fever elevated it). Thru trial-‘n-error I found the hydroxyzine held the spikes at bay. But I found myself living on the anti-histamine, and I didn’t have allergies — perhaps, they were only drying me up? And all the indicators (oximeter, peak flow charts, etc.) never warned of the bad spots. It’s very confusing…

    The past two years has meant appointments about 4 times a week, seeing every (10!) possible specialist (gastroenterologist, neurologist — I did have a stroke due to a PFO, when they also found an incidental PE — allergists, cardiologists, ENT, hematologist, speech pathologist, etc., etc. and all the resulting and sometimes very invasive tests) looking for a cause which had my PCP perplexed and the pulmonologist grasping at straws, I’m thinking. It had to, then, be things like anxiety, deconditiong, COPD? (A sleep study did show my O2 dipped to 88 during my sleep. I remain on bedtime oxygen.). At no point, during those years, did I have energy for anything resembling close to a normal life. A childless and windowed senior, everything else fell by the wayside.

    Finally, last visit, I was put on Spiriva which seemed to do the trick. My PCP says the pulmonologist was “thinking outside the box”? I can get out of the chair and hope to live my life, now. I’ve converted my loft into a gym which resembles a pulmonary rehab facility. Lastly, a new allergist started Atrovent, and my PCP, accordingly, started Azelastine which both seem to, then, finally take care of all the decade plus of never-ending sinus moisture. Why, oh why did it ever take so very long…?

    Dr. Strong, I can’t seem to find much at all on non-allergic asthma and the corresponding non-allergic rhinitis which seem so very connected in my case, starting 14 years ago and which seems really severe. It’s been totally crippling for the past three years, and asthma, supposedly is something with which one can live normally. Right? So, I’m hoping, sharing my story, will urge you to address this important “other” type of asthma in the future for clinicians if at all possible.

    Thanks for listening,
    Linda

  • Great video! However, with the growing antibiotics resistance, I don’t think every admissable patient should receive this treatment. An estimated half of all COPD exacerbations are caused by viral infections. You should give antibiotics if the patient is clinically affected, has increased purulence of sputum from baseline AND either dyspnea or increased sputum production.

  • what about using steroids in pt with co-morbidity like DM,HF-and COPD exacerbation
    what are the precautions for pt with COPD in case of air travel

  • Already such a difficult diagnosis, managing COPD now during the COVID-19 pandemic is even more challenging. This article shares some helpful resources and tips: https://www.careworkshealthservices.com/copd-at-home-during-covid-19/

  • I look healthy, can still exercise adequately for someone my age, get very short of breath just walking up a single flight of steps. My ling function testing hovers around 28-34. If I cheat and use my albuterol emergency inhaler just prior, I van get up to 40 maybe. I have had a catscan that reported my illness be severe. I look 40 and am 56 so it surprises doctors and some people dont believe it. I wonder if I will even have a future to look forward to bc I have no family and no real loved ones. I find it hard to desire a nice future and live only day to day. My dog is dying and it doesn’t help my feelings of hope. The Dr told me that if I have a bad exacerbation my life could drastically change for the worst. What is there to hope for really… cannot have a relationship bc I may not have much of a future. I have NEVER smoked and know others that have their whole life and ate healthier than me. I feel God is very unfair often.

  • YeS! COPD Which never even existed until BOG PHARMA coined the term as
    an all purpose blanket to do a “one size fits all” treatment blanket.
    ALL of the meds that worked have been removed from the market one by one
    for a myriad of different make believe reasons and only the crap that
    barely works remains.
    Take note that the inhaler market sales exploded when the horseshit
    eveironmental reason for removing Primatene mist from the market took
    place in 2012 thanks to O’Bomba.
    Tweet President Trump and ask him to help get Primatene BACK ON THE
    MARKET AND BACK IN STORES And put an end to this nonsense

  • I am an ID doc in NYC who has started volunteering in the hospital as a hospitalist. I haven’t done general inpatient medicine for 17 years since the end of my residency. So I’ve been binge watching over 40+ videos from your entire playlist, and they are a godsend! I feel like I’ve gone through a whole residency all over again and feel much more confident taking care of these really sick COVID patients. Thanks Dr. Strong!

  • My colds go right into bronchitis. This past winter I had it twice. And the first time my doctor put me on steroids. I’ve had COPD for over twenty years. I used to be a smoker. I was an idiotic fool. It took my doctor telling me, a week before Xmas and in front of my daughter, that if I didn’t stop smoking I was going to die. She at six years old, asked me to make that her Xmas present. What do you say to your kid? Right? Well if you love them you say Okay. Which is what I did. I tossed the last pack, got the patches, and never looked back. She, I believe, saved my life. I was on several inhalers at first, but as time went by I got off of them all, except for when I have the bronchitis. Then I have to use a Prednisone inhaler. Once the bronchitis is gone, though, I am off of them again.

  • Thank you so much for this series
    Hope you will continue it for acute emergency managment series for intern
    Heartly congratulation to u for your effort
    Thank u from bottom of my heart

  • This video is super useful for me. I have my practice in a rural comunity on northern mexico. Here we have a lot of elderly people with COPD due to the way they used to cook or their labor on the corn fields. I have seen a lot of new patients in carpenters that dont use their protection gear while cutting o painting due to extreme heat in the summer time. Thanks for your time and effort!

  • I want to be an EMT one day, and i enjoy your videos, they are a great way to absorb a good bit of helpful information. Thank you for making them.

  • As always, awesome videos Dr. Strong! More power! With regards to PE work up, would it be reasonable to just get D dimer first before looking into chest CT versus a VQ scan?

  • I have(had) really bad acute severe COPD, diagnosed since 2 years back many attacks led me to take ambulances to the A&E, 5/6/7 times, 4/5 days in there on drip amoxyciline, levofloxycina, later Prednisona uuurrrg at home, that was the only thing that would relieve the extreme exacerbations after an hour of almost dying,,. I tried everything medicinal, believe me. BUT, the ONE thing that has changed my life, really, is inhaling dry himalayan salt. It is a Godsend. 3 bucks a kilo, which will last me a years, please, if you have COPD, just do it. My mucus cleared up in a matter of days, now after a couple of months, along with heavy dosage daily of Vitamin D3 2000 i/u /day, plus Zinc daily, and a small Vit. B supplement to help absorb the D3 into the blood and not over create calcium in the blood, still use a Ventolin(Salbutemol) spray, but much much less, i used to use one a day!!! now one a week…I feel like I am being cured, it’s AMAAAAAAZING!!!Trust me,it’s natural, it’s real!!!

  • I have included this video for students to reference on my education channel. This is important for nursing students to understand.

  • My Mother and Grandmother died from this and I’ve got it. I smoke and it’s crazy that I am finding it almost impossible to stop. My COPD is much worse. It’s a very scary thing.

  • This video is so wrong, I had the test, I was told that I have asthma. I am not wheezing like other asthma suffers do, and I have known a lot in my time. I have smoked and drunk for 30 years plus of my life, I am literally out of breath in the mornings when I wake up, a walk to the shops is painful, I often have to see my toilet on return. COPD is often misdaiagnosed as asthma, so please do more research and do not settle for the asthma diagnosis.

  • Managing COPD can be so difficult. Some breathing exercises that may help bring relief from the symptoms of COPD can be found here: http://akhomehealth.com/home-care-library/breathing-exercises-relieve-copd-symptoms/

  • I watch every one of your videos I can find, because each time I learn something new or get reinforcement regarding information I already have learned well. Thank you!